How to Clean a Guinea Pig Cage?

C&C cages are meant to be cleaned in place. There’s no need to lift the base out of the grid perimeter to take it outside to hose it down. That’s unnecessary and impractical. After removing the bedding, spray the inside of the coroplast base with a mixture of half water/half white vinegar and wipe clean with a rag, paper towels, or a soft brush. Rinse with a clean, damp rag and replace the bedding.

It depends on a lot of factors with your bedding system, your cage setup and your guinea pigs. Empty the Kitchen or litter pan area, remove it and clean it thoroughly with the vinegar solution.

Add a half to a full cup of vinegar for odor control and help disinfecting. You almost always want to do a full cage cleaning at least once a week, typically on your weekend when you’ve got more time and attention to devote to being thorough. Not to mention they become a breeding ground for bug infestations, bacteria, molds, and fungal infections like ringworm.

This is why we recommend replacing the canvas bottom of the Midwest cage with a walled, Coroplast insert . Or use our Fleece Flippers as bedding which contain a Coroplast insert to help prevent urine from seeping into the fabric of the canvas. All of our Kitchens can be slid forward from the end of the cage for better access for refreshes and full cleanings.

Our Cavy Cafe can pretty easily be lifted out of the cage, and the used bedding can be dumped into a wide-mouth garbage bag/bin in front of you or outdoors. The point of putting disposable bedding in the kitchen area is that a) that should be the area where the majority of guinea pig excrement ends up and b) the poos can be mixed into the loose bedding and dried out better, so that the guinea pigs aren’t walking around in mushy poos.

How many times do you clean a guinea pig cage?

You almost always want to do a full cage cleaning at least once a week, typically on your weekend when you’ve got more time and attention to devote to being thorough. That makes refreshing the cage every 2, 3 or 4 days somewhat of a challenge.

Do guinea pigs care if their cage is dirty?

Guinea pigs won’t die directly from a dirty cage but they can die from the unclean conditions that it creates. If left dirty for too long, those unclean cage conditions can create mental and physical health problems for guinea pigs that can lead to them dying.

How often should a guinea pig be cleaned out?

A good rule of thumb is that you should give your guinea pigs’ hutch a clean out on a twice-weekly basis. This involves taking all of their bedding out of their sleeping area, emptying and cleaning their food bowl, cleaning their feeding area, replacing all the bedding and replenishing the food.

This article was co-authored by Pippa Elliott, MRCVS. Dr. Elliott, BVMS, MRCVS is a veterinarian with over 30 years of experience in veterinary surgery and companion animal practice. She graduated from the University of Glasgow in 1987 with a degree in veterinary medicine and surgery. She has worked at the same animal clinic in her hometown for over 20 years.

Once you set up a guinea pig cage (or build one yourself), you will need to clean it every day to prevent bacteria buildup from their feces or urine, which can ultimately lead to infection. Here, I would like to show you how easily and quickly you can get it done.

Once you set up a guinea pig cage (or build one yourself ), you will need to clean it every day to prevent bacteria buildup from their feces or urine, which can ultimately lead to infection. All the little black dots in the picture above are their poop, and the urine was pretty full as well on this day when I had changed their litter box.

Before starting the cleaning procedure, I take both of my guinea pigs from the cage and put them in a bucket. It can be any bucket or their traveling cage, as long as they can be comfortable while waiting for you to finish cleaning up their home. However, I don’t always have to move them, because they run up to the top level when I decide to clean, which makes my life even easier.

I think they realize I’m about to clean and prefer the top level rather than the bucket or travel cage. Next, I take their toys, food bowl, water bottle, and pigloo out of the cage, then wipe them down with my 50/50 water-and-vinegar solution. Then, to take out the vinegar smell, I spray a very little amount of rubbing alcohol and let it dry.

It will be changed today, so I will dust it off instead of using the lint roller to clean their fur off of the towel. But to make sure any hair on the towel does not cause any problems, it is best to dust it off or vacuum it before it goes into the washing machine. The fourth thing I do is take out the coroplast and litter box I provided my piggies for their bathroom/dining room and dump all the wood-chip bedding in a big trash bin.

Its pretty much the same process, except I need to be thorough with the coroplast because this is where my piggies stay and eat most of the time. For the next step, I cover the coroplast with old newspaper for more absorption, top it off with wood-chip bedding, and return it to the cage. After that, I refill the food bowl with the guinea pigs’ pellets and change the water in their bottles in order to keep it fresh at all times.

Lastly, I put their toys, food bowl, and water bottle back to their cage. The process is fairly quick and painless, providing that your pets are potty trained to use a litter box. It is not meant to substitute for diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, prescription, or formal and individualized advice from a veterinary medical professional.

Animals exhibiting signs and symptoms of distress should be seen by a veterinarian immediately. Super late reply sorry, but took me a few weeks but i find it differs from one pig to another They popcorn a lot in there so I have a few layers, there is a soft foam padding wrapped in a bed sheet and then the towel over on top.

The wood chip is fully changed once every three days, I pour in a lot and scoop out little at a time as they poop or pee. It’s just a regular bathroom towel, inever had the piggies get tangled up in the fabric before.

Sharing all of the tools you need to keep your guinea pig cage clean and keep it smelling fresh, tips on fleece bedding, and setting up a guinea pig cage.

After researching a bit more, I learned that guinea pigs need a much bigger cage and that 7 square feet is the minimum requirement. I didnt mind purchasing said guinea pigs, or the fact that Id be responsible for feeding and keeping two more creatures alive in our house, but the thing that did worry me was the potential smell.

(Note: guinea pigs like to hide since theyre prey animals, so definitely have a few hidey huts for them. The thought of using the fluffy cotton things all over the cage grossed me out, especially since it would feel wasteful to change it out as much as I would like. I just clean the cage every 2-3 days and the entire thing once a week with fresh bedding (which takes maybe 10 minutes).

Daily vs. Weekly Cleaning

Once you set up a guinea pig cage (or build one yourself), you will need to clean it every day to prevent bacteria buildup from their feces or urine, which can ultimately lead to infection. Here, I would like to show you how easily and quickly you can get it done.To make it simple for everyone to understand my instructions, I will divide the cage into three parts:

Potty Training Provides a Huge Benefit

See? It is really not bad if the guinea pigs are potty trained.All the little black dots in the picture above are their poop, and the urine was pretty full as well on this day when I had changed their litter box. I had missed a day of cleaning because of work and errands, and when I got home I was too tired to do any more work.From the picture above, you can see that they kept their little carpet area clean and did most of their business inside the tray.

How to Clean the Cage

This is the process I use when cleaning out my pets’ cage. Expect it to take about 10 minutes.Before starting the cleaning procedure, I take both of my guinea pigs from the cage and put them in a bucket. It can be any bucket or their traveling cage, as long as they can be comfortable while waiting for you to finish cleaning up their home. However, I don’t always have to move them, because they run up to the top level when I decide to clean, which makes my life even easier. I think they realize I’m about to clean and prefer the top level rather than the bucket or travel cage.Next, I take their toys, food bowl, water bottle, and pigloo out of the cage, then wipe them down with my 50/50 water-and-vinegar solution. Then, to take out the vinegar smell, I spray a very little amount of rubbing alcohol and let it dry. Some of the toys I don’t always use.The next thing I do is take my lint roller and roll it on the towel. Twice a week, when I change the towel, I will skip this step and instead take the towel out of the cage, dust it off outside, and put it in the laundry machine.Their towel is usually clean, but over time, it will start to have an odor no matter how clean it is because their little paws track in urine. But to make sure any hair on the towel does not cause any problems, it is best to dust it off or vacuum it before it goes into the washing machine.

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The fourth thing I do is take out the coroplast and litter box I provided my piggies for their bathroom/dining room and dump all the wood-chip bedding in a big trash bin. Dumping it into a big trash bin rather than a small one lessens the likelihood of spilling any of the chips, but if there are spills, I just take the broom and dustpan and clean them.After dumping everything out from the coroplast, I spray with my solution again and then wipe it off. And just like how I clean the toys and everything else, I spray a little rubbing alcohol, then let it dry. It’s pretty much the same process, except I need to be thorough with the coroplast because this is where my piggies stay and eat most of the time.For the next step, I cover the coroplast with old newspaper for more absorption, top it off with wood-chip bedding, and return it to the cage.After that, I refill the food bowl with the guinea pigs’ pellets and change the water in their bottles in order to keep it fresh at all times.Lastly, I put their toys, food bowl, and water bottle back to their cage. And that’s about it; I return my piggies to their cage, and all is well.

And We’re Done!

As mentioned earlier, all of this will take about 10 minutes. The process is fairly quick and painless, providing that your pets are potty trained to use a litter box.