How to Bathe a Rabbit?

If youre new to keeping rabbits as house pets, you may be wondering: How can I help to keep my bunny clean? Thankfully, a rabbits general cleanliness is a very attractive part of keeping one as a pet: They do a great job of keeping themselves clean, and rarely need to be given baths. Rabbits are not big fans of water, and their coats can take a very long time to dry completely.

This guide will show take you step-by-step through the process of choosing a method of cleaning and give helpful tutorials for each type of bath. When your rabbit is only mildly dirty perhaps with some excess dust or hay on their coat a dry bath is the perfect solution.

Spot cleaning should be your next bathing method: Dip a towel into warm water, and lightly dab it onto your rabbits dirty areas. Instead, keep the dampness as close to the surface of their coat as possible, and use a blow dryer to finish helping them dry out. Whereas this sort of bath may be the norm for messy dogs or cats, it should be your last resort to help clean your rabbit.

Rabbits keep an average body temperature of 101-103 degrees Fahrenheit and can be easily affected by hypothermia if submerged in water. Be absolutely sure to use the lowest heat and airflow settings, and keep the blow dryer well away from your rabbits face.

Is it OK to bathe a rabbit?

Rabbits are meticulously clean and almost never need a bath. Bathing them can even be harmful, since they tend to panic in water and may fracture a limb or their spine if they thrash around. … But it’s usually not safe or beneficial to wet down the bunny’s whole body.

How do you clean a dirty rabbit?

Luckily you can spot clean your rabbit without using water. This is highly advisable, since many rabbits go into shock when they get wet. Sprinkle some cornstarch over the dirty spot and use a fur comb to work out the dirt. Keep going until the fur is clean.

How do you dry a rabbit after a bath?

Remove your rabbit from the water and place them onto a towel. ….Gently pat the wet areas of your rabbit with the towel. ….With a hair dryer on the lowest heat setting, start to dry and fluff up the fur on your rabbit’s butt. ….Keep going until your rabbit is completely dry.

Why You Should Never bathe a rabbit?

Bathing is unnecessary, and can cause health problems. Panicked rabbits may thrash around in water, injuring their limbs or spine (especially if they find themselves in water unsupervised). … Water in the ears can cause an ear infection. Like other small animals, rabbits can catch a chill and become sick from being wet.

This article was co-authored by Pippa Elliott, MRCVS. Dr. Elliott, BVMS, MRCVS is a veterinarian with over 30 years of experience in veterinary surgery and companion animal practice. She graduated from the University of Glasgow in 1987 with a degree in veterinary medicine and surgery. She has worked at the same animal clinic in her hometown for over 20 years.

Rabbits are interesting pets, but many proud owners are initially confused about their grooming, bathing, and cleaning habits. These cuddly creatures display some strange behaviors, so naturally, their grooming methods are a little different than cats or dogs. Well dive into the details of how to properly clean your pet rabbit from bathing their bodies and brushing their fur to keeping them spotless overall.

Additionally, their fur is notoriously hard to dry, so your pet may be vulnerable to hypothermia or respiratory illnesses if left wet, or even damp. If the smell hasnt gone away by applying baby cornstarch powder (scented or not), use some pet towelettes to refresh areas.

If the smell isnt letting up, you might need to clean their cage to remove any yucky odors that are sticking to your pet rabbit. If youre nervous about trimming your rabbits nails, ask a professional groomer or your vet to demonstrate it a few times until you feel comfortable. Luckily, weve reviewed some essential grooming routines like brushing their fur, giving them dry baths, and trimming their nails to keep them properly clean.

Rabbits are meticulous self-groomers, but this doesnt mean that their people dont need to groom them as well. Grooming time is a good time to get to know your rabbits body. Check/feel bunny from head to toe (including the private area, feet, nails and teeth) checking for lumps, bumps, cuts, fleas, overgrown nails or teeth, and any other changes or possible trouble spots. Your lap or a table with a big towel on it are good places to groom your friend. NEVER leave her unattended on anything h high.

Brushing your bunnys coat can be a very pleasant experience for the both of you, plus it reduces the amount of loose hair which will help prevent hairball impactions (see Zooh Pamphlet). A bit of saline solution (for contact lenses) can be used on bunny cheeks to crystallize tears, which can then be brushed out with a clean flea comb.

A cotton swab can be used to remove wax from the outer canal and ear tip (the long part). Take care not the put swap in too deep, as it could push wax in deeper, or cause other problems.

Dry Bath

When your rabbit is only mildly dirty – perhaps with some excess dust or hay on their coat – a dry bath is the perfect solution. Something as simple as giving them a thorough brushing is a reliable method to clean your bunny on a regular basis. Be sure to get a comb or brush that is specifically made for rabbits, as they have finer teeth than most brushes made for dogs or cats.If your rabbit has a dirty wet spot, the dry bath is a perfect solution. Just sprinkle a little bit of cornstarch on the wet area, then use your rabbit comb to brush it out. Even if they are nearly covered in mud, it’s a better idea to use a dry bath section by section than to get them wet, as this poses a risk of sending them into shock.

Spot Cleaning

At times when your rabbit is particularly dirty or smelly, it may be necessary to use a little bit of water to help groom them. Spot cleaning should be your next bathing method: Dip a towel into warm water, and lightly dab it onto your rabbit’s dirty areas.Rabbit skin is very delicate, and their fur takes a very long time to dry completely – so try to avoid soaking all the way through to the skin. Instead, keep the dampness as close to the surface of their coat as possible, and use a blow dryer to finish helping them dry out.

Blow Dry

If the previous two methods have not been effective in getting your rabbit clean, it’s time to move onto the last method of bathing: the sink bath. Whereas this sort of bath may be the norm for messy dogs or cats, it should be your last resort to help clean your rabbit.Why is this? Rabbits keep an average body temperature of 101-103 degrees Fahrenheit and can be easily affected by hypothermia if submerged in water. What’s more, being in even a small amount of water can be anxiety-inducing for many rabbits, leading them to thrash and possibly injure themselves.To make a sink or tub bath as safe as possible:After its bath, first towel-dry your rabbit as much as possible, and then blow-dry its coat to finish the drying process.

Do rabbits clean themselves?

Like feline pets, rabbits groom themselves with their tongues. They’ll first lick their paws and use these spit-slick “brushes” to clean other body parts. This helps get rid of shedding fur, dirt, and other surface-level messes. Sounds inefficient? Don’t worry — rabbits have been using this method since the dawn of time, and frankly, it’s simple but it works.Moreover, rabbits clean themselves constantly. Like, all day

Spot cleaning your bunny: A safer option

Spot cleaning lets you clean your rabbit without exposing him to the dangers of a bath. When you do this, you’re cleaning only part of his body, eliminating the risk for both hypothermia and shock-related symptoms. To spot-clean your rabbit’s leg, for example, you could dunk just his leg into room-temperature water, rub in vet-approved shampoo, then rinse the leg with the aid of a small dish (via Omlet). No running water, please! It could be too loud and powerful for a lot of rabbits.For a messy bottom, a damp towel should do the trick. You can sit your bunny in a small tub for washing, but remember to empty the water regularly, as rabbits may panic if sitting in too much water. This may also make his bum even harder to dry later on, so think ahead before “bath” time. Perhaps you can use the bathtub to avoid this, or even improvise! Drilling a few holes into the bottom of that small plastic tub should allow enough drainage for your bunny to stay comfy.

How do I groom my pet rabbit?

The average pet rabbit molts two to three times a year. During this phase, they’ll shed tons of fur. In an attempt to speed up the process and to keep themselves clean, rabbits might groom themselves even more during this molting. Brush their fur at least once a week even if they’re not molting. Even on a regular day, your rabbit will lose significant amounts of hair.Brushing will prevent any dangerously large hairballs from forming in their stomachs, and it will help the molting process go more smoothly. On the other hand, long-haired rabbits need haircuts and trims to keep their beautiful coat healthy. Again, this also reduces hairballs in their stomachs.

GENERAL

Grooming supplies to have on hand:Rabbits are meticulous self-groomers, but this doesn’t mean that their people don’t need to groom them as well. Grooming time is a good time to get to know your rabbit’s body. Check/feel bunny from head to toe (including the private area, feet, nails and teeth) checking for lumps, bumps, cuts, fleas, overgrown nails or teeth, and any other changes or possible trouble spots. Your lap or a table with a big towel on it are good places to groom your friend. NEVER leave her unattended on anything h high.

BATHING

We do not advise flea baths or baths of any sort for rabbits. Bathing a bunny can often cause her to become quite upset, sometimes causing her to go into shock; plus it is the nature of bunny fur to take a long time to get wet, and an even longer time to get dry. Spot bathing extremely dirty areas (feet, scut, etc.) is the way to go. If you use a hair dryer, us it on low to medium heat so you don’t overheat the bunny, and keep it at least 12 inches from her body. Don’t use it on her head, ears or privates. Sometimes bathing is necessary. In these cases, do it in a small sink in warm water. DO NOT EVER immerse entire bunny (water level should never be higher than belly level); instead, let bunny stand on hind feet while you support her upper body from the front. Slowly let her put all four paws into water. Use a cup to soak and rinse body. Rinse thoroughly.Brushing your bunny’s coat can be a very pleasant experience for the both of you, plus it reduces the amount of loose hair which will help prevent hairball impactions (see Zooh Pamphlet). Do not brush too aggressively. Bunny skin is delicate and can tear, and unless your bunny likes it (some of ours do) do not brush fur in the wrong direction.

FEET

Like dogs and cats, bunnies sometimes need to get their toenails trimmed. While it is easy to see the ‘quick’ inside of light toenails, darker ones sometimes obscure it. Using a flashlight underneath dark nails can help prevent cutting them too short. Have a styptic pencil and antiseptic ointment on hand in case of bleeding. Use the styptic pencil to stop the bleeding, then use the ointment to prevent infection. Make sure that the padding (fur) on feet is not worn down or matted. Make sure bunny has soft mats to rest on (in her house) and clean litter.

EYES

Eyes should be clear. Eye discharge needs to be checked out by a vet. Runny eyes can make cheeks sticky and matted. Use a tissue to absorb the liquid. A bit of saline solution (for contact lenses) can be used on bunny cheeks to crystallize tears, which can then be brushed out with a clean flea comb.

TEETH

Bunny teeth grow continuously throughout their lives. For this reason they MUST have safe woods * available for them to chew on to help file teeth down. For most bunnies this is all that is needed, but some bunnies’ teeth grow crooked or “maloccluded” and they will have to be clipped or removed by a GOOD bunny vet. Maloccluded, overgrown teeth keep bunny from eating properly or at all— and bunny can become anemic or starve to death.