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This article was co-authored by Natalie Punt, DVM. Dr. Natalie Punt is a Veterinarian and the Founder and CEO of mPet. She specializes in small animal emergency and general medicine and veterinary practice economics. Dr. Punt holds a BS in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from The University of California, Davis, an MS in Biochemistry from The University at Buffalo, and a DVM from Western University of Health Sciences.

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How can I tell how old my kitten is?

A kitten’s weight in pounds roughly corresponds to his age in months, and he will gain weight at a relatively predictable rate until about 5 months of age. As long as a kitten is in good body condition, you can safely guess that a 1-pound kitten is about 4 weeks old and a 3-pound kitten is about 12 weeks old.

How old is a kitten when it purrs?

Usually, a kitten begins to purr at 3 weeks of age.. His first purrs are intended for his mother to communicate her feeling of well being. Growing up, a kitten will also purr along with its siblings to communicate its peaceful intentions or to calm a situation in a conflict.

Kittens are adorable at any age, but did you know that figuring out how old a kitten is can help determine what sort of care they need? It can be tricky to tell, but our at-a-glance kitten progression guide, featuring Darling the kitten and his siblings, is here to help you out.

When kittens are first born they are completely helpless— their eyes are closed, their ears are folded , and they can’t stand, keep themselves warm or eat on their own. Notice that the kittens’ ears are just beginning to unfold, though their eyes remain closed. After almost a week, the kittens begin to wiggle around on their own a little bit and their eyes start to open. One week in this world, Darling, Denby, Corduroy, Tweed, and Wembley are becoming more aware of their surroundings. During their second week, Darling, Denby, Corduroy, Tweed, and Wembley continue to grow by leaps and bounds. Now that Darling, Denby, Corduroy, Tweed, and Wembley are more aware of their surroundings, they are beginning to interact with each other, but still need mom. Their sense of smell is developing, and they will hiss at unfamiliar scents or sounds—though the tiny sounds that come out are most likely not as ferocious as they think! Kittens this age can start to eliminate waste on their own, without the help of mom or a caregiver. Now that the kittens have reached this milestone, it’s time to start litter box training. At this age you can start introducing solid food—use wet food at first, and try mixing it with kitten formula. By now, Darling, Denby, Corduroy, Tweed, and Wembley look like fluffy, miniature versions of their mother. Darling, Denby, Corduroy, Tweed, and Wembley are thriving babies, starting to explore the world around them and play frequently with friends and toys. Now that the kittens’ sight is fully developed, they are engaging in vigorous and exhaustive play, running around and exploring until they quite literally fall asleep right where they are. While they are experimenting with solid food, kittens like Darling, Denby, Corduroy, Tweed, and Wembley are still nursing from their mother (or being bottle fed by you) a few times a day. Play—with each other and with you—is an important part of kitten socialization because it helps them bond with each other and build confidence around people. Showing their independence, Darling, Denby, Corduroy, Tweed, and Wembley are beginning to demonstrate their individual personalities: Darling is a talker; Denby is always up for adventure and a good wrestle; Corduroy is brave and confident; Tweed is sweet and loves belly rubs; and Wembley is a cuddle bug and full of silly mischief. He’s using the litter box and eating cat food – though he still visits mom for snacks and comfort. This is the age when the people caring for Darling, Denby, Corduroy, Tweed, and Wembley and the rest of their cat family begin teaching the kittens how to play, letting them know that human hands are not for biting or scratching. No longer wobbly on their feet, the kittens have found stability using their tails to help balance. The kittens are stalking, hiding and pouncing, and digging—instinctual behaviors ingrained in all cats, whether they grow up indoors or outdoors. Incorporate grooming into your interactions with the kittens—especially if you have a single kitten, or you are raising a litter without the mother cat. They are pretty self-sufficient at this point, though Darling, Denby, Corduroy, Tweed, and Wembley still get comfort from mom. The kittens are fully weaned from their mother, but their continued development and growth together is important enough to put off adoption for another couple of weeks. This is the height of the kittens’ eye-paw coordination and play activity, leading them to try more daring and complex feats. It’s a good idea to keep a close eye on them during this time and ensure their play area is safe for budding daredevils. By nine weeks, the kittens are clearly showing an attachment to their caregivers, cuddling on laps and seeking out attention. As they start to look more and more like adult cats, the kittens’ growth rate is finally beginning to slow. Though they will continue to develop muscle tone and stealth, they won’t be doubling their weight in a matter of days or weeks anymore. They eat mostly solid food, and mom is close to being done with the occasional nursing that may still be going on—if you were bottle feeding, you’re probably done by now. The kittens are exhibiting all of the behaviors of adult cats, using their body language to communicate with their caregivers. Darling is fully weaned, neutered, and—because he was socialized to people— ready for his loving adoptive home . It’s so hard to say goodbye to these adorable kittens, but Darling, Denby, Corduroy, Tweed, and Wembley are fully weaned, socialized, spayed or neutered, and have found loving adoptive homes.

Have you ever had a cat suckle on your shirt, lick your hair, or drool while they kneed your belly? These can be signs that your furry friend was taken away from her mother too early. While those suckling behaviors might be cute, cats that are separated from their litters too young can also have real problems with aggressive and fearful behaviors.

Some shelters offer “pre-adoption” programs , which invite pet parents to meet and adopt young kittens before they are ready to leave their mother cat, then wait a few weeks until their new kitten is old enough to come home. As cat advocate Hannah Shaw, The Kitten Lady, explains, the benefits include improved immune health, good manners, and resilience. This can result from missing out on maternal antibodies and nutrition that come from mother cat’s milk. Dr. Morgan writes, “Maternal immunity is passed from the mother to the newborns through colostrum, which is the first milk on which they feed. If a mother cat is fond of her human caregivers, the kitten will learn that people are safe and loving. Without the examples of friendliness, and a safe environment to explore and develop confidence, a kitten can grow up untrusting and fearful of people. Life skills like grooming and litter box use aren’t innate behaviors in cats—they have to be learned from a kitten’s mother. Weight can vary, of course, based on breed, size of the parents, and other factors. Vets look for a specific groove present on the surface of adult canine teeth. At 4 weeks, kittens have a nearly full set of baby teeth that they can use to eat small amounts of solid food. The furry scoundrels can also use their tiny teeth to bite their mother while nursing. The mother cat might choose to begin the weaning process when those teeth come in—you know that’s gotta hurt! Over time, the mother cat (also known as the “queen”) gradually discourages her kittens from nursing, until they are eating solid or canned food exclusively around 8-10 weeks of age. Six Weeks: Kitty is using the litter box and eating cat food, but still nurses and snuggles up with mom. Eight Weeks: Kitty is on her way to weaning herself and might begin to get most of her nutrition from dry or wet cat food, with only occasional nursing. Nine Weeks: Kitty is eating solid food and acting more like an adult cat in body language. 10 Weeks: If Kitty and her littermates are in your living room, you will probably find them climbing the curtains, under the sofa, and inside the flower vases. 11 Weeks: Kitty loves to sleep in a pile with her siblings and play rough together.

If you’ve helped rescue a few kittens or found a stray litter that you want to support, it’s a good idea to find out how old the kittens are. This can help you work out what specific care they need.

It’s worth noting that stray kittens should never be separated from their mothe r or removed from their nest before you establish if the mother is coming back. If you’re looking for a quick summary of key milestones of kitten growth, we’ve included a checklist at the bottom of the article! Image Credit: Azami Adiputera, ShutterstockNewborn kittens will still have their umbilical cords attached. They’ll also search for the warmth and comfort of their mother cat or a similar heat source. Newborn kittens can’t yet regulate their own body temperature, and it’s vital that they’re kept warm with a constant heat source. Image Credit: NataVilman, ShutterstockAt this age, kittens will still have their eyes closed, but their ears will start to unfold. Don’t try to speed along this process; some kitten’s eyes will open faster than their littermates, but they’ll all get there eventually! They can already purr and make kitten distress calls to attract the attention of their mother cat or you, as the case may be. Image Credit: Azami Adiputera, ShutterstockBy now, a kitten’s eyes are fully open, but their vision is still improving. Image Credit: tanewpix168, ShutterstockAt this age, a kitten’s incisors will start to come through their gums. Kittens at this age still need a heat source, but the ambient temperature can be dropped to 75 degrees. Image Credit: Gosha Georgiev, ShutterstockBy now, a kitten’s canine teeth will start to erupt. Now is a good time to interact with your kittens, to help build their confidence and become happy around people. While kittens are being weaned, keep a close eye on their weight to make sure they’re still gradually gaining a healthy amount. You can start to introduce them to a few new experiences, including exploring other cat-safe areas of the house, meeting other pets and people in controlled environments, and trimming their claws. Image Credit: Linn Currie, ShutterstockBy 7 weeks old, most kittens will be eating solely wet food, offered freely throughout the day. Image Credit: Dyadya_Lyosha, PixabayOnce a kitten is 8 weeks old, they’re ready to move to their new forever homes! By this stage, kittens will start forming strong bonds with their human caretakers, seeking you out for reassurance, cuddles, and playtime. Umbilical cord still attached Folded ears Closed eyes Needs to be kept warm because they can’t regulate body temperature Should weigh 50-150 grams Umbilical cord now absent Folded ears Eyes start to open at 8-12 days (always colored blue) Cannot control own body temperature Should weigh 150-250 grams Ears fully upright Discovering objects like litter trays Incisors starting to emerge Should weigh 350-450 grams Image Credit: Ashley Swanson, Shutterstock Canine teeth emerging Steady when walking Able to see more clearly Should weigh 350-450 grams Premolar teeth starting to emerge Discovering and trying wet kitten food Should weigh 550-650 grams All milk teeth now emerged Eating kitten food Confident and steady on feet Should weigh 650-750 grams

About This Article

Newborn Kitten

When kittens are first born they are completely helpless—Learn more about newborn kittens in our Kitten Guide

The First Week

When kittens are first born, they are helpless—they cannot see, hear, keep themselves warm, or eliminate waste on their own. They fit in the palm of your hand and weigh 3-5 ounces. Kittens like Darling, and his siblings, are completely dependent on their mother (or you!) for protection, warmth, and nutrition. Even so, these kittens can purr and make distress calls. They spend 90 percent of their time sleeping and the other 10 percent eating.

One Day Old Kitten

At one day old, the kittens cannot stand. Their eyes are closed and their ears are folded. Kittens this young require round-the-clock care and bottle feeding every two hours.

Three Days Old Kitten

Notice that the kittens’ ears are just beginning to unfold, though their eyes remain closed. Their sense of smell, hearing, and taste are slowly starting to develop.

Six Days Old Kitten

After almost a week, the kittens begin to wiggle around on their own a little bit and their eyes start to open.

One Week Old Kitten

One week in this world, Darling, Denby, Corduroy, Tweed, and Wembley are becoming more aware of their surroundings. Their eyes are almost completely open, though their eyesight is still unfocused. They have doubled their birth weight to around eight ounces. At about seven days old, a kitten’s ears will unfold.

The Second Week

During their second week, Darling, Denby, Corduroy, Tweed, and Wembley continue to grow by leaps and bounds. By the end of the week, their ears will be almost completely uncurled and they will begin to crawl. They still depend completely on a caregiver—either mom or you—for food and waste elimination.

Eight Days Old Kitten

The kittens snuggle together for warmth and comfort and rarely venture far from mom, their nest, or each other.

Nine Days Old Kitten

The kitten’s eyes are all blue—and they will stay that way for the first couple of weeks. Their true eye color may not become completely apparent until they are two months old

Twelve Days Old Kitten

The kittens are becoming more comfortable venturing away from mom, though they are wobbly on their feet.

Two Weeks Old Kitten

Now that Darling, Denby, Corduroy, Tweed, and Wembley are more aware of their surroundings, they are beginning to interact with each other, but still need mom. Their sense of smell is developing, and they will hiss at unfamiliar scents or sounds—though the tiny sounds that come out are most likely not as ferocious as they think! They are also kneading, though they cannot yet retract their claws.

The Third Week

By the third week, you can tell if the kittens are boys or girls. (Darling, Denby, Corduroy, and Tweed are all boys; Wembley is the only girl). Their teeth are coming in and their walking is becoming more confident. You can start providing aAt the end of his third week, Darling’s now playing with his siblings and getting more mobile.

Fifteen Days Old Kitten

Even at this age, the kittens still spend a substantial part of their day sleeping.

Sixteen Days Old Kitten

The kittens are just beginning to play and develop their fine motor skills.

Twenty Days Old Kitten

Kittens this age can start to eliminate waste on their own, without the help of mom or a caregiver. Now that the kittens have reached this milestone, it’s time to start litter box training.

Three Weeks Old Kitten

If you are bottle feeding, you’ll notice the kittens are drinking much more at each feeding, but at fewer feedings, probably four to five times a day. At this age you can start introducing solid food—use wet food at first, and try mixing it with kitten formula. By the end of the week, their weight will have increased to close to 15 ounces. They are walking steadily, without too much wobbling.

The Fourth Week

Look how much Darling has grown! At four weeks kittens are sturdy on their feet and playing with each other, toys, and people.By now, Darling, Denby, Corduroy, Tweed, and Wembley look like fluffy, miniature versions of their mother. They are showing interest in the outside world, interacting with their littermates more and also beginning to interact with people and toys. That means it’s time to begin socializing these kittens!

Twenty Two Days Old Kitten

Notice that their ears are fully extended and they are holding themselves up well. They are sturdy! Their fur is beginning to fill out and you may be able to tell who will have short, medium or long fur. These kittens all have short fur.

Twenty Three Days Old Kitten

Who wants to play? Playing is a great way to socialize kittens and teach them fun and positive ways to interact with people.Get tips on how to socialize kittens at alleycat.org/Socialization.

Four Weeks Old Kitten

It’s been one whole month! It’s amazing how quickly these helpless kittens have grown up over a four-week period. Darling, Denby, Corduroy, Tweed, and Wembley are thriving babies, starting to explore the world around them and play frequently with friends and toys.

The Fifth Week

Get ready for a lot of fun! Darling is now full of energy and plays exuberantly. He developing lots of personality!This is when the fun begins. Now that the kittens’ sight is fully developed, they are engaging in vigorous and exhaustive play, running around and exploring until they quite literally fall asleep right where they are. While they are experimenting with solid food, kittens like Darling, Denby, Corduroy, Tweed, and Wembley are still nursing from their mother (or being bottle fed by you) a few times a day. Interacting with people is important for kittens at this age.

Thirty One Days Old Kitten

Exuberant play means tired kittens! Play—with each other and with you—is an important part of kitten socialization because it helps them bond with each other and build confidence around people.

Thirty Two Days Old Kitten

The kittens are being handled by people early and often to encourage their social development. Getting love and play from humans helps them connect positive experiences with people—something that will help when they are adopted into new homes.

Five Weeks Old Kitten

Showing their independence, Darling, Denby, Corduroy, Tweed, and Wembley are beginning to demonstrate their individual personalities: Darling is a talker; Denby is always up for adventure and a good wrestle; Corduroy is brave and confident; Tweed is sweet and loves belly rubs; and Wembley is a cuddle bug and full of silly mischief.

The Sixth Week

Every day Darling is getting more sure of himself through socialization and play. He’s using the litter box and eating cat food – though he still visits mom for snacks and comfort.Continuing to socialize the kittens only gets more important as they grow. This is the age when the people caring for Darling, Denby, Corduroy, Tweed, and Wembley and the rest of their cat family begin teaching the kittens how to play, letting them know that human hands are not for biting or scratching.

Want to learn more about kittens and how to care about them in the sixth week?

Thirty Seven Days Old Kitten

No longer wobbly on their feet, the kittens have found stability using their tails to help balance.

Forty Days Old Kitten

The kittens are stalking, hiding and pouncing, and digging—instinctual behaviors ingrained in all cats, whether they grow up indoors or outdoors.

Six Weeks Old Kitten

The kittens are now proficient at cleaning themselves, having learned it from birth from their mother. They are also grooming each other, reinforcing the bond between siblings. Incorporate grooming into your interactions with the kittens—especially if you have a single kitten, or you are raising a litter without the mother cat.

The Seventh Week

Darling isThe kittens are

45 Days Old Kitten

As part of socialization, the kittens are being introduced to different parts of the house, different objects, different pets and people, and different experiences—all to help them adjust to new situations.

47 Days Old Kitten

The kittens have been introduced to scratching posts and had their claws trimmed for the first time. Training the kittens to understand these routines helps prepare them for their new homes.

Seven Week Old Kitten

Almost fully weaned from mom, the kittens are growing up! These little kittens are hitting their stride and becoming independent.

The Eighth Week

Two pounds! Darling nowAt this point, the kittens’ caregivers started looking for their adoptive homes. The kittens are fully weaned from their mother, but their continued development and growth together is important enough to put off adoption for another couple of weeks.

Fifty Four Days Old Kitten

This is the height of the kittens’ eye-paw coordination and play activity, leading them to try more daring and complex feats. It’s a good idea to keep a close eye on them during this time and ensure their play area is safe for budding daredevils.

Eight Weeks Old Kitten

At two months the kittens weigh about 2 pounds and can be spayed or neutered.

The Ninth Week

Looking pretty grown-up, Darling! At this age kittens are behaving and using their body language like adult cats. Darling isBy nine weeks, the kittens are clearly showing an attachment to their caregivers, cuddling on laps and seeking out attention.

Fifty Seven Days Old Kitten

Their adult eye color is clear now: Darling, Denby, Corduroy, Tweed, and Wembley all have yellow eyes.

Sixty Days Old Kitten

As they start to look more and more like adult cats, the kittens’ growth rate is finally beginning to slow. Though they will continue to develop muscle tone and stealth, they won’t be doubling their weight in a matter of days or weeks anymore.

Sixty Two Days Old Kitten

The kittens are on more of a schedule now, sleeping and eating at regular intervals. They eat mostly solid food, and mom is close to being done with the occasional nursing that may still be going on—if you were bottle feeding, you’re probably done by now.

Nine Weeks Old Kitten

The kittens are exhibiting all of the behaviors of adult cats, using their body language to communicate with their caregivers.

What is the ideal age to adopt a kitten?

According to New Jersey Holistic Veterinarian Dr. Judy Morgan, kittens should remain with their mother and litter mates until 10-12 weeks of age. Other sources, such as the Australian RSPCA recommend 8 weeks, or use a weight limit of two pounds. This seems to be a common guideline for US shelters, which list adoptable cats as young as 2 months of age.Some shelters offer “pre-adoption” programs, which invite pet parents to meet and adopt young kittens before they are ready to leave their mother cat, then wait a few weeks until their new kitten is old enough to come home.

The benefits of keeping a kitten with her litter

There are many benefits to leaving a kitten with her mother and littermates until 8-12 weeks. As cat advocate Hannah Shaw, The Kitten Lady, explains, the benefits include improved immune health, good manners, and resilience.
Cats that were taken away from their mothers too early can be prone to illness. This can result from missing out on maternal antibodies and nutrition that come from mother cat’s milk. Dr. Morgan writes, “Maternal immunity is passed from the mother to the newborns through colostrum, which is the first milk on which they feed. The colostrum contains a lot of antibodies… If the kitten misses out on the colostrum during the first 24 hours, they will not be able to absorb the antibodies later and will be left unprotected from disease.”
Kittens learn a lot about manners from their mothers and their littermates. Gentle play is good manners, and it’s a very important skill for a well-mannered cat to have. A kitten’s mother and siblings let them know when they are playing too rough. Most cat lovers have met cats that don’t have this skill, and we have the bite marks to prove it!
Likewise, a kitten learns friendliness and fearfulness from her mother and littermates. If a mother cat is fond of her human caregivers, the kitten will learn that people are safe and loving. Without the examples of friendliness, and a safe environment to explore and develop confidence, a kitten can grow up untrusting and fearful of people.
Life skills like grooming and litter box use aren’t innate behaviors in cats—they have to be learned from a kitten’s mother. I’ve lived with a gorgeous long-hair cat with poor grooming skills. It ain’t pretty, and it is smelly!

How to Tell the Age of a Kitten

According to PetMD, veterinarians often use a combination of weight and tooth status to estimate the age of kittens. The ASPCA agrees and outlines four ways to tell the age of a kitten.If a kitten is healthy and well-fed, weight can be used as a good estimate of age. A kitten’s age in pounds is roughly equal to her age in months, up to about 6 months of age. A one-month old kitten should weigh about one pound, and a six-week-old kitten should weigh about a pound and a half. Kittens ready for adoption at 10-12 weeks should weigh 3.5-4 pounds. Another way to calculate age is by adding 100 grams per week, so a 10-week-old kitten should weigh around 1000 grams (1 kg, or 2.2 pounds).Weight can vary, of course, based on breed, size of the parents, and other factors. Interestingly, many large domestic cats, such as Maine Coons, reach their adult weight at a later age than smaller cats. They might not be a lot larger as kittens, but they keep growing (and gaining weight) until they are as old as four years, whereas most cats reach their full adult weight around one year.Teeth can give more useful clues in determining age. Kittens get their first teeth at 2-3 weeks. These baby teeth are extremely tiny! Baby teeth keep coming in until 8 weeks. Around 8 weeks, a kitten will get her adult canine teeth.Telling these first adult teeth from baby teeth can be tricky. Vets look for a specific groove present on the surface of adult canine teeth.

How Kittens Naturally Separate from their Mother Cat

Weaning is the process of transitioning from mother’s milk to solid food. Weaning begins naturally around 4 weeks of age and continues until the kitten is 8-10 weeks old.At 4 weeks, kittens have a nearly full set of baby teeth that they can use to eat small amounts of solid food. The furry scoundrels can also use their tiny teeth to bite their mother while nursing. The mother cat might choose to begin the weaning process when those teeth come in—you know that’s gotta hurt!Over time, the mother cat (also known as the “queen”) gradually discourages her kittens from nursing, until they are eating solid or canned food exclusively around 8-10 weeks of age.

Newborn

Newborn kittens will still have their umbilical cords attached. Their eyes will be closed and their ears folded over. Their paw pads and nose leather will often be pink at this stage, before they darken. Newborn kittens can’t yet see or hear, so they rely on their sense of smell. They’ll also search for the warmth and comfort of their mother cat or a similar heat source.Newborn kittens can’t yet regulate their own body temperature, and it’s vital that they’re kept warm with a constant heat source. Their body temperature will gradually increase from a newborn temperature of around 95-97 degrees Fahrenheit to 100 degrees Fahrenheit. The optimal temperature of their environment will be 85-90 degrees.By day 1, a kitten’s umbilical cord should be dried out, and at around 5 days of age, this will fall off naturally. Don’t be tempted to remove it yourself; just wait for nature to do its job!At this age, kittens have no gag reflex, so take great care if you’re bottle-feeding orphan kittens. They will need feeding every 2 hours and need help to poo.

1 week old

At this age, kittens will still have their eyes closed, but their ears will start to unfold. Their eyes will slowly open from days 8-12. Don’t try to speed along this process; some kitten’s eyes will open faster than their littermates, but they’ll all get there eventually! Kittens will all have blue eyes.They can already purr and make kitten distress calls to attract the attention of their mother cat or you, as the case may be.By now, kittens should have doubled their weight at birth. They still can’t regulate their own body temperature, so they are in danger of becoming too cold if their environment isn’t kept warm enough. Week-old kittens will spend 90% of their time snoozing and the other 10% eating!If you’re bottle-feeding orphan kittens, feedings can now be spread out to once every 3 hours. They will still need help being encouraged to poo.

2 weeks old

By now, a kitten’s eyes are fully open, but their vision is still improving. Their ears will start to unfold more but are still somewhat rounded. These little cuties will start moving around but will be unsteady as they work out how to coordinate those paws.At this age, kittens will start to interact with each other in addition to sleeping and eating. They may start kneading with their front paws, although they can’t yet retract their claws.Their environment needs to be kept at a steady 80 degrees. You can deworm kittens at this age, using a wormer product designed for kittens.Bottle-fed kittens can now be fed every 3-4 hours. They will still need help pooing.

3 weeks old

At this age, a kitten’s incisors will start to come through their gums. Their ears are now fully unfolded and pointed.By now, most kittens will be confidently walking around, albeit being a little wobbly at times! They will also be starting to explore things outside of their bed, including the litter box!Kittens at this age still need a heat source, but the ambient temperature can be dropped to 75 degrees.By this age, it’s possible for an experienced handler to tell if kittens are male or female.Bottle-fed kittens will now need to be fed every 4-5 hours. They’ll start making the transition from needing help to go to the bathroom to using the litter box on their own.

4 weeks old

By now, a kitten’s canine teeth will start to erupt. They will be steadier on their feet, as well as experimenting with running and playing. Their coordination will be gradually improving.They will be spending more time playing, running, and interacting with each other — until they fall asleep from sheer exhaustion, that is! Now is a good time to interact with your kittens, to help build their confidence and become happy around people.Kittens will now be able to regulate their body temperature to a certain degree, but you should still provide a source of heat and keep the ambient temperature at around 70-75 degrees.Bottle-fed kittens will need bottle feeding every 5 hours, but they should now be able to use the litter box independently.

5 weeks old

A kitten’s premolars will be starting to come through, and this is an indication that they can start being introduced to wet kitten food alongside their mother’s milk or kitten milk replacement powder. While kittens are being weaned, keep a close eye on their weight to make sure they’re still gradually gaining a healthy amount.Bottle-fed kittens can now be fed every 5-6 hours. By this age, all kittens should have food and water freely available at all times.

6 weeks old

At 6 weeks old, all of a kitten’s milk teeth should now be present. Kittens this age can continue being weaned onto wet kitten food, and by the end of this week, they should be almost entirely eating wet food rather than their mother’s milk or bottle formula. Food and water should be available at all times.Kittens will now be grooming themselves and each other! You can start to introduce them to a few new experiences, including exploring other cat-safe areas of the house, meeting other pets and people in controlled environments, and trimming their claws.At this age, you can book an appointment for your kittens to receive their FVRCP vaccine. This is a combination vaccine designed to protect against feline viral rhinotracheitis, feline calicivirus, and feline panleukopenia.

7 weeks old

By 7 weeks old, most kittens will be eating solely wet food, offered freely throughout the day. Their eyes may change color from blue, as their adult eye color starts to emerge.

8 weeks old

Once a kitten is 8 weeks old, they’re ready to move to their new forever homes!Kittens over 2 pounds in weight can also be booked for their spaying and neutering procedures.By this stage, kittens will start forming strong bonds with their human caretakers, seeking you out for reassurance, cuddles, and playtime.