How Often Do You Take a Cat to the Vet?

Kittens should be seen by their veterinarian once every 3-4 weeks for the first 16 weeks of life. At these visits, your kitten will get a series of vaccinations to help protect them against a number of infectious and life-threatening diseases. Your veterinarian will help you determine the best vaccine schedule and selection for your kitten based on their lifestyle.

During each visit your veterinarian will do a complete head to tail physical examination: listen to your kittens heart and lungs, look at their eyes, ears, mouth and skin, palpate the abdomen and look for any congenital abnormalities or signs of ill health. Prior to each visit, we find it helpful to make a list of any health or behavior questions you may have for your veterinarian so you dont forget to ask it.

Dont forget to write down the name of your pets food, so we can assess its quality and caloric content. These initial examinations may seem a bit overwhelming (emotionally, financially and timewise), butthey set the stage for your cats long-term good health and well-being. Please be sure to bring a list of questions you may have for your veterinarian, and the names anddosages of medications or nutritional supplements that you are giving your cat.

This information will help the veterinarian better navigateyour pets health and formulate a treatment plan. We highly recommend yearly Wellness bloodwork to be performed on all adult cats at their annualhealth visit. A future professional dentalcleaning and assessment under anesthesia may be recommended by your veterinarian based on their discovery.

Cats are very secretive about their pain and discomfort, so dont be misled by their apparent well-being and forgo scheduling this very important visit. In senior pets, we perform yearly CBC, Chemistry and Thyroid bloodwork and a urinalysis regardless of their outward healthy appearance. Before coming to this biannual visit , carefully observe your pets movement while walking, after rising from a nap, jumping or climbing in and out of litterbox.

Bleeding, vomiting, uncontrollable diarrhea, loss of appetite, lethargic, depression, dietaryindiscretion (eating something they shouldnt have), limping, increased water intake and weight loss are some examples of reasons to schedule examination appointments outside of your pets annual visit.

Do cats need to see a vet every year?

Adult Cats and Wellness Checks. Just like humans, cats should see the vet once a year even if they seem perfectly healthy. … Annual vet appointments – wellness checks, as they’re called – can help head off potentially serious diseases. Some vaccines also require “boosters” every few years to remain effective.

When should you take your cat to the vet?

Signs Of Obvious Distress. ….Abnormal Litter Box Behavior. ….Repeated Vomiting. ….Overwhelming Fatigue. ….Sudden Change In Appetite. ….Dragging Back Legs. ….A Lump Or Unusual Growth. ….Coughing Or Other Breathing Changes.

How often do cats need to be checked on?

Adult (3 to 6 years) and Mature (7 to 10 years) cats. For otherwise healthy cats, during the Adult and Mature life stages, veterinary checks once a year are recommended. Again, the focus of these visits will generally be on prevention of disease and maintaining the optimum wellbeing for your cat.

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Horses can safely eat a wide variety of household foods which can make great supplements to a traditional diet. As a responsible horse owner, its key to understand the common vital signs of your equine companion, especially throughout the taxing summer months.

Theres a popular myth that cats dont require the same amount of veterinary care as dogs. Some owners assume these self-sufficient creatures are fine unless they show obvious signs of sickness, and they fail to keep up with regular vet appointments. If you have a feline friend in your home, its important to look past these misconceptions and get your cat the care he or she needs.

Theres a common misconception that indoor cats arent exposed to any dangers and dont need these shots. In this case, your vet can simply test your cats immunity level to make sure he or she is protected.

After the age of ten, cats often see the vet as many as three times a year, particularly if they suffer from obesity, arthritis, liver problems, or kidney issues.

As a loving pet parent, you probably know that one of the most important things you can do for your cat is to get regular veterinary care. But what does “regular” mean? How often should you take your cat to the vet?

The bottom line, Wheeler says: Form a good working relationship with your veterinarian because he or she will best advise you on how often your specific pet needs checkups. This kicks off your relationship with your chosen veterinarian and provides an opportunity for the vet to start observing and tracking your kitten’s health from very early in his life.

Vaccines will begin when your kitten is 68 weeks old, depending on their lifestyle, family history, and common diseases where you live, Wheeler says. Those initial trips to the vet will also include physical exams and a discussion about flea and tick prevention , Wheeler says. Vaccine boosters will continue as your pet eases out of its kitten stage (1 year old and onward, Wheeler says).

Kitten Vet Visits

New cat owners are usually bound by an agreement with a shelter or breeder to take their kitten to see a vet soon after adoption. This kicks off your relationship with your chosen veterinarian and provides an opportunity for the vet to start observing and tracking your kitten’s health from very early in his life.Vaccines will begin when your kitten is 6–8 weeks old, depending on their lifestyle, family history, and common diseases where you live, Wheeler says. This first round will include shots for rhinotracheitis, calicivirus, and panleukopenia.About three or four weeks later, your kitten will get the second round of those vaccines, recurring every three or four more weeks until the kitten is roughly 4 months old.Around the three-month mark is when the rabies vaccines start, Wheeler says, with boosters at the one-year mark and then every three years (or whatever the manufacturer recommends).Those initial trips to the vet will also include physical exams and a discussion about flea and tick prevention, Wheeler says. This is also a good time for you to ask for your vet‘s advice about any behavior or training questions you might have.Soon after, around the six-month mark, your cats will be ready to be spayed or neutered.

Adult Cat Vet Visits

Vaccine boosters will continue as your pet eases out of its kitten stage (1 year old and onward, Wheeler says).Your vet will inquire about your cat‘s lifestyle, especially whether he’s an indoor-only cat or a cat that sometimes ventures into the outdoors. Outdoor or indoor-outdoor cats face more risks outside: parasites, predators, and maybe even becoming separated from your best friend Otis and having a heckofa time finding the way back to the farm.Another risk that increases for cats who venture outdoors: Diseases like feline leukemia, which spreads from cat to cat (although it doesn’t affect humans or other pets). That vaccine will also be offered to your cat as a kitten and recur throughout your cat‘s life.Recurring visits will also give your vet a chance to inspect your cat‘s teeth, along with giving general physical exams and advice about preventative care. “[I] can’t say enough about dental care,” Wheeler says. Teeth cleanings will help prevent bad breath, and you‘ll want to make sure your pet’s teeth and gums are healthy so your cat doesn’t have trouble eating or isn’t in any pain.Vaccines, like the one for rabies, will continue, too. Your vet is likely to recommend them for every one to three three years, Wheeler says.