This is a question that more than 5754 of our readers have been asking us! Luckily, we have found the most appropriate information for you!

Welcome to our betta fish feeding guide. In this in-depth article, we’ll try to answer all your questions about betta food. If we don’t, ask away in the comments.

However, if you are unsure of the amount to feed your betta, you may like to weigh out 1.8 grams of your chosen food the first time you use it so that you get a rough approximation of what the portion size should be. Some bettas will happily consume more than 1.8 grams, and you do not need to strictly adhere to this number, but it’s a good amount (as a rule of thumb) to aim for in order to maintain the health of the fish. Bettas are very intelligent compared to other fish, so if you stick to a feeding time, chances are they’ll remember it. Bettas don’t tend to like flaked food because when it sits on the surface of the water it’s similar in appearance to debris. Giving your betta living food is a very natural, healthy option for your fish, but it can also pose a risk. Even so, there’s no 100% guarantee that it won’t be carrying anything, so bear this in mind if you do decide to feed your betta living food. Cubes will vary in size depending on manufacturer, but again, stick to the rule of thumb of feeding the betta 1.8grams. Because the food lacks moisture, it can absorb and expand, causing the fish to have constipation once it enters the digestive system. If you do decide to feed your betta freeze-dried food, you should first soak it in some aquarium water with an aquatics multivitamin (or any vitamin solution for fish). As mentioned before, freeze-dried food isn’t a good regular diet for bettas as it absorbs moisture in their stomachs and expands. If your betta is a fussy eater, try soaking the freeze-dried food in a flavour enhancer too (for example Seachem’s “Garlic Guard” ). Daphnia are tiny planktonic crustaceans that live in ponds and filter feed on microscopic algae and organic matter. This isn’t necessarily problematic if it happens rarely, but it you constantly overfeed your betta it will likely make it ill. If you feel you have overfed you betta, simply leave it to fast for a few days and allow it to digest all the food in its system. Simply grab a fresh pea (make sure it hasn’t been exposed to pesticides), boil it, peel the skin off, then chop it into small pieces so that they are bitesize for your betta. Living food is great for rearing hatchlings as it’s nutritious and it moves around, so it grabs the attention of the fry, making it easy for them to hunt.

How much do you feed a betta fish daily?

In the wild, bettas sometimes eat small insects that land on the water, so naturally, pellets are more effective. Anything between 4 to 6 pellets a day is a good amount to feed a betta. This measurement can vary as manufactures produce differently-sized pellets, so take this measurement as a rule of thumb.

How many days can a betta fish go without food?

As we’ve just mentioned, betta fish can survive between 10-14 days without food. However, there are some major factors you should consider before leaving your betta fish unattended for such a long period of time.

How many flakes should I feed my betta fish?

Additionally, if there are enough flakes being placed in the tank that the filter can become clogged, there are too many being fed to him, so he may simply not be able to eat them all. Bettas only require one to two pellets or flakes per meal, twice a day.

How do you know if your betta fish is hungry?

Floating in one place is not on the agenda, except when they’re tired. If you notice your betta lethargic most of the time, and especially when you stand in front of his tank, he’s either sick or hungry.

A common question we are asked, is “how often do you feed a betta fish?” Given their tropical nature, like most other warmer tanks, bettas need to be fed at least twice a day. This is especially important considering that many betta fish tend to be overfed, receiving large meals infrequently. Along with inappropriate water temperatures, overfeeding can lead to a very dangerous gastrointestinal condition that can kill your betta.

Once you have selected a diet for your betta , it is critical that the container is stored properly and replaced every 6 months.

“How often should I feed my betta fish?” is a question that’s often asked by amateur aquarists who are thinking of taking on one of these breathtakingly beautiful fish as a pet.

Overfeeding your fish can cause serious health problems for your pet, as well as polluting the aquarium water, and increasing the bioload on your filtration system. For example, a single mosquito landing on the water could be the only food a betta gets for a couple of days, so these fish tend to make the most of every feeding opportunity. Unfortunately, overfeeding leads to serious health conditions for the fish , including bloating, obesity, constipation, and swim bladder problems . Also, overfeeding can make more work for your filtration system, as uneaten food drifts down to the substrate, where it gradually breaks down, polluting the water and harboring bacteria. Once your betta has eaten, it takes time for the food to be processed by his digestive system before the waste matter passes through him. Live and frozen food contain virtually zero dry matter, and so it passes relatively quickly and smoothly through the betta’s gastrointestinal tract. However, dried pellets and flakes swell markedly when exposed to water, which means that they pass slowly through the fish, sometimes accumulating and causing blockages. A vacation fish feeder is an automated, programmable food dispensing system that you can set to feed your betta at pre-set times throughout each day. Take a look at your betta fish, and you’ll see that he has an upturned mouth filled with tiny white teeth. That makes it difficult for the fish to digest “fillers,” including cereals that are used in many pellet and flake foods. The pellets are packed with all the protein and nutritional ingredients that your fish needs for good health, and they also have an all-natural, color-enhancing additive to make your betta’s colors really pop. Crucially, baby pellets are just the right size for a betta’s tiny mouth, and they float too, reducing waste and allowing your fish plenty of time to eat his meal. Freeze-dried bloodworms and brine shrimp are a perfect addition to your fish’s diet, being packed with protein and guaranteed not to contain the parasites that sometimes come with live foods. Freeze-dried foods make an ideal treat, but they shouldn’t form the mainstay of your fish’s diet, as they don’t have a sufficient nutritional balance and can cause bloating if fed in large quantities. You can buy a wide variety of frozen foods, including bloodworms, daphnia, brine shrimp, mosquito larvae, and tubifex worms, all of which will be greatly appreciated by your betta. These wriggling little creatures live in pools of stagnant water and ponds and form much of a wild betta’s diet. Feeding live and frozen foods are a good idea, as these closely mimic what your fish would eat in the wild and are what his digestive system has evolved to process. Therefore, adding small amounts of these foods as a regular component of your pet’s diet can help to keep your betta’s gastrointestinal tract in good working order. Without a good diet, your fish won’t thrive, so, if your betta refuses to eat or his appetite seems to be dwindling, you must investigate. Many new owners get their betta home and install him in a perfectly decorated and equipped tank only to find that their new pet won’t eat. With bettas, a loss of appetite or a lack of interest in food is not uncommon and is generally caused by stress. If the water in the tank cools to below 76° Fahrenheit, your betta fish’s metabolism slows down, leaving him lazy and not interested in food. Dirty tank water that has high levels of ammonia and nitrites will make a betta fish sick , and, therefore, he won’t eat. When a previously healthy fish stops eating, and you’ve ruled out the aforementioned problems, it’s likely he has a health issue.

Owning a betta fish (Betta splendens), aka Siamese fighting fish, is quite popular as they’re some of the most beautiful fish to have in aquariums. However, many betta fish owners struggle to find the best and definitive answer to this question “how often do you feed a betta fish?”

Even though every betta fish food container shows the recommended feeding amounts, the quantities presented are often quite misleading. If your betta looks normal, you can continue with the same feeding routine, and if it’s bloated, you should take care of it so cut down on quantity. It’s essential to know that bettas’ feeding time lasts for about two minutes since their digestive tracts are very small. Because of their small digestive tracts, bettas can’t process fillers like corn and wheat and may not react very well to these. Taking good care of your fish is crucial, and you should help your betta get rid of the piled-up toxins in its body. In addition, you need to provide your betta with moisture and fiber as it takes care of its digestion. All betta keepers need to ensure that their pets get food rich in protein, fiber, fat, calcium, vitamins, carbohydrates, and phosphorous. Many pellets and flake foods meant for different types of fish contain fillers that may cause constipation and other digestive issues to your betta. Besides you’d need to store them in your home, bloodworms are a great source of energy, unlike any other food, and they’ll help your pet grow and live a healthy life. Even though frozen bloodworms aren’t as cheap as some other food types, you can easily store them for a long time. They come with different high-quality ingredients that will help take good care of your fish and give it a healthy diet so it could live longer. Therefore, be careful when feeding your betta with pellets as you don’t want them to grow in your pet’s digestive tract. Like humans and most animals, taking good care of betta fish requires them to have a diverse diet. As a responsible betta fish keeper, you’d want to ensure you feed your pet with best and most appropriate foods like something they’d get outside their tank and in their home habitat. Moreover, the human food you feed your betta has to provide your fish with nutrients their diet recommends so they’d live longer in your tank. Boil the cucumber until it becomes soft, and make sure to slice lettuce and spinach to tiny bits so your betta can easily nibble and digest them. Peas are full of fiber, making them excellent for relieving your fish from constipation and bloating. In addition, it’s essential to scoop out and remove any leftover human food pieces from the aquarium within 30 minutes. Therefore, cow, chicken, and pork meat won’t do any good to your fish and they’ll live a shorter life. Nonliving foods you can feed fry bettas include frozen brine shrimp, crushed pellets, freeze-dried tubifex worms, etc. In addition, you can provide fry bettas with food for any baby fish up until they reach four to six months of age. Additionally, you can put a food block into the tank that will dissolve in water over time, or you can ask someone to keep your betta fed on your behalf. Both types will dissolve when they come into contact with tank water while slowly releasing food particles to your fish. A betta’s stomach is no bigger than its eye, and if you give your fish too much food, it may struggle to eat it all. Ultimately, it comes down to knowing how frequently you should feed a betta fish and the right amounts of food it needs. A weekend trip should be fine, but you should find someone to keep your fish fed and manage your tank if you’re planning a more extended vacation. Fry bettas require various foods in their diet and more frequent feeding than their adult counterparts do.

How much to feed a betta fish

A good daily portion of food for an adult betta is about 1.8 grams, but it doesn’t have to be exact. This applies regardless of the type of food you are feeding your betta. A betta keeper is not expected to meticulously weigh out 1.8 grams of food everyday, especially when a betta is on a diet of different types of food. However, if you are unsure of the amount to feed your betta, you may like to weigh out 1.8 grams of your chosen food the first time you use it so that you get a rough approximation of what the portion size should be. Some bettas will happily consume more than 1.8 grams, and you do not need to strictly adhere to this number, but it’s a good amount (as a rule of thumb) to aim for in order to maintain the health of the fish.

When to feed a betta fish

It’s a good practice to feed a betta one whole portion once a day, or two half portions twice a day. We recommend the twice-a-day feed as it’ll keep your betta that little bit more happy and stimulated. Bettas are very intelligent compared to other fish, so if you stick to a feeding time, chances are they’ll remember it.

What to feed a betta

It’s very important to give your betta a varied diet in order to keep it happy. Bettas love live food. If it isn’t of that much inconvenience, consider substituting the pellets for live food on a daily basis. A betta can live purely on live foods but not purely on pellets. Move your betta onto live food as soon as possible — no transition phase is needed.

Pellets or flaked food?

As a beginner, it’s not a bad idea to feed bettas pellets, but most bettas tend to be fussy when it comes to flaked food. Bettas don’t tend to like flaked food because when it sits on the surface of the water it’s similar in appearance to debris. Pellets also sit on the surface of the water, but they look more like insects. In the wild, bettas sometimes eat small insects that land on the water, so naturally, pellets are more effective.Anything between 4 to 6 pellets a day is a good amount to feed a betta. This measurement can vary as manufactures produce differently-sized pellets, so take this measurement as a rule of thumb. Aim for about 1.8 grams worth (for an adult betta) if you are unsure.Another variable to consider is the size and age of the betta. Younger bettas will need less pellets, older bigger bettas more. When reaching the end of their life span, some bettas will start eating less as they lose their appetite, so don’t put too many pellets in the aquarium if they’re not going to eat them. The fish will either overfeed or the pellets will sink to the bottom, decompose and then cause excess waste.Something else to take into account is your brand of fish food. Some pellets instantly sink to the bottom of the aquarium as soon as they hit the water. Most manufactures that produce specifically for bettas will create pellets that float – this will be specified on the pellet packaging. Aqua One Betta Pellets are a brand that we have been impressed with and used for our bettas.When deciding which pellets to give your fish, it’s a good idea to look at the ingredients. They’re usually written somewhere on the food packaging. You want to make sure your betta is getting the right nutrients. Pellets manufactured specifically for bettas usually contain the right ingredients, but some pellets are known to be better than others. Look for the level of protein given in the pellets; bettas are carnivores so protein is one of the most important vitamins for them. Good pellets will actually contain dried meats like brine shrimp, krill or fish. A minimum of 30% protein is what you should aim for.

Live Food

Live food usually consists of aquatic insects like bloodworm, brine shrimp and daphnia; similar to what bettas would eat in the wild, thus making live food one of the best options for your betta. Live food can be bought in three different forms: living, frozen or freeze-dried. Living or frozen foods are the best option for your fish — at least one of these will usually be sold in any good fish/pet store.Dried or freeze-dried versions (for example, freeze-dried bloodworm) is good, but shouldn’t be used to regularly feed your betta. It lacks nutrients compared to other live foods and can cause constipation. When feeding live food to a betta, aim to give it about 1.8 grams on a daily basis.Just to clear up any confusion about terminology: ‘Live food’ refers to the type of food, i.e. insects. This ‘live food’ is available in three different forms: living, frozen, or freeze-dried. It may seem a bit redundant referring to live food as being living, but it’s so we can easily distinguish between the three different forms, which we’ll now look at in more detail.

Living Foods

Giving your betta living food is a very natural, healthy option for your fish, but it can also pose a risk. Living food has a very high nutritional value and will please a betta, but some living food can carry disease. Bettas have been known to catch all kinds of diseases from it, the worst being tuberculosis (although this is a rare occurrence). Once contracted, tuberculosis is fatal for a betta.In the same way that if you put an infected fish into an aquarium, the infection can spread to all the other fish, the same can happen with living food. Because it’s ‘living’ it can harbour disease or parasites. Living food should therefore only be purchased from a reliable source/farm. Even so, there’s no 100% guarantee that it won’t be carrying anything, so bear this in mind if you do decide to feed your betta living food.Any professional, reliable fish store will stock their living food from a reliable farm. These aquatic insects are alive and are usually kept in watertight packaging. The insects available are usually bloodworm, brine shrimp, daphnia, etc. The alternative option is buying eggs and hatching the living food yourself. This gives you more control, but it still doesn’t guarantee that it won’t be carrying disease.

Frozen Foods

Most live food that has been frozen comes in cube form. Cubes will vary in size depending on manufacturer, but again, stick to the rule of thumb of feeding the betta 1.8grams.Regardless of manufacturer, cubes will always be big enough that giving a whole cube to one betta is a bad idea; most cubes are way too big to be used in one go.Instead, cut the cube into quarters. Then take one of the quarters and divide it in four — generally speaking these four parts will be small enough to be fed to the betta in one sitting. Defrost them, leave them out on a plate for about 20 minutes, then give to the betta. Sometimes it doesn’t seem like a lot, but it’s appropriate for a betta fish. A betta’s stomach is only about the size of its eyeball, so it gets full up rather quickly!

Freeze-Dried Food

Freeze-dried food is not the same as frozen food. Frozen food is great to give to your betta, if not on a regular basis. Freeze-dried food, not so much. This is because freeze-dried food lacks important vitamins which are lost in the drying process. Because the food lacks moisture, it can absorb and expand, causing the fish to have constipation once it enters the digestive system.If you do decide to feed your betta freeze-dried food, you should first soak it in some aquarium water with an aquatics multivitamin (or any vitamin solution for fish). An example brand is Boyd Enterprises “Vita Chem” for freshwater. As mentioned before, freeze-dried food isn’t a good regular diet for bettas as it absorbs moisture in their stomachs and expands. Also, it doesn’t tend to contain enough nutrients. By simply soaking it in this solution for about 15 minutes before feeding it to your betta it will a) pre-expand the food and b) allow it to soak in beneficial nutrients. This is a good way to feed your betta.If your betta is a fussy eater, try soaking the freeze-dried food in a flavour enhancer too (for example Seachem’s “Garlic Guard”). This way your betta will be more likely to take the food.

Growing your Own Live Food

If you really want to give your betta a treat, you could grow your own live food. Below are instructions on how to grow bloodworm, daphnia and brine shrimp for your betta.

Bloodworm

Bloodworm isn’t actually a worm. It sure does look like one, but it’s actually the larval form of a species of fly known as a midge. In the wild, bloodworm grow in ponds, puddles, pools or any stagnant, shaded bodies of water. The flies lay their eggs in the water, which hatch into bloodworm (the stage they are used to feed fish). Then they pupate and hatch into flies. Bloodworms are usually cultivated in netted troughs on a farm. These troughs are shaded, and contain stagnant water and natural debris to help stimulate the worm growth.A good way of mimicking this at home is by simply filling a bucket up with natural / de-chlorinated water, then adding dead leaves / soil so it sits at the bottom of the water in the bucket. Leave the bucket in a shaded area and simply wait. Over time, midge flies should lay their eggs in the water. These eggs will then hatch into bloodworm and grow. Two to three weeks after setting up the bucket, check for the bloodworm. They’ll be ready to feed to your fish when they’re about 2 cm in length and a bright red colour. You can try picking them out by hand (bloodworm are harmless) or netting them. You can also tip the content of the bucket out into a net or sieve to try sieving them out.

Daphnia

Daphnia are tiny planktonic crustaceans that live in ponds and filter feed on microscopic algae and organic matter. On a farm, daphnia are usually cultivated in large, slightly-filtered troughs. To grow your own, first you’ll need to acquire some daphnia / water-flea eggs. You can usually obtain these online, or at a fish store. They’ll need to go into some sort of container, such as a bucket. Simply fill the bucket with de-chlorinated water or rainwater and leave to stand for 2 days before adding the eggs.It shouldn’t take that long for the daphnia to grow (2 weeks, max). They’ll look like little grains of salt swimming around in the water when adult. Algae will naturally grow in the bucket for them to feed on. The hatched daphnia will breed with each other over time once hatched. Simply catch them with a net to feed them to your fish, but don’t catch all of them at once if you want them to reproduce. If you are planning on maintaining them for a long time, do an 80% water change of their container every 2 to 3 weeks.

Brine Shrimp

Find a container you wish to grow your brine shrimp in: any bucket, plastic container or aquarium will do. The brine shrimp need to have aerated water, so take this into account too. The best way to aerate the water is with an air stone – you can order air pumps / air stones online, or you should be able to find one in a fish or pet store. Fill the container with de-chlorinated, treated water. You’ll need to grab some aquarium salt or salt without iodine.For every 40ml of water, add 1.25 grams of salt. Leave this to mix and add the aerator to the container. Leave the water for 12 hours before adding the brine shrimp eggs. You can buy brine shrimp eggs online or a fish store may sell them. Once the eggs have been added to the water, it should take anything between 12 to 48 hours for the shrimp to hatch. A brine shrimp will be a fully grown adult at 6 weeks of age, but are a substantial meal for an adult betta at just 4 weeks old. Simply catch the brine shrimp you want to feed to your betta within a net, or you can just use your hand – brine shrimp are harmless.

Overfeeding

Any betta enthusiast will hear, “Never overfeed your betta!”, or something along those lines. So, why’s it so bad? There are a few reasons why.Bettas are greedy, they’ll eat as much food as they can get. All that’s going through their little fishy head is, “more more more”, “this might be my last meal”, “I should cram as much in as possible”. In the wild, bettas would rarely be exposed to a mass amount of food and wouldn’t necessarily eat that often, hence the constant thought to eat as much as possible should the opportunity arise. However, it would be rare for them to overfeed, and if they do it will only be on the odd occasion. If a fish consumes too much food at once, bloating, digestive blockage and constipation can occur. This isn’t necessarily problematic if it happens rarely, but it you constantly overfeed your betta it will likely make it ill.You’ll usually be able to tell if the fish is over fed just by looking at its stomach. The fish will look disfigured as its belly will be quite bloated. It may also have trouble swimming – sometimes overfeeding can cause swim bladder disorder (SBD). If you think your fish has got SBD from overfeeding, don’t worry too much. SBD isn’t permanent, but you do need to address it.If you feel you have overfed you betta, simply leave it to fast for a few days and allow it to digest all the food in its system. Once the symptoms seemed to have dissipated, continue normal feeding.Constipation or digestive blockage won’t always occur due to overfeeding; it may be due to a poor diet. Dry food or food that contains very little moisture has been known to expand in a bettas digestive system and cause blockages. Of course, if you don’t feed your betta dried food too often, this is unlikely to occur. This is another good reason to give your betta live food as much as possible compared to dried food or pellets.

Feeding your Betta a Pea

One of the oldest tricks in the betta book known to combat betta SBD and constipation is to feed it a de-skinned pea. This may sound a little strange, but it’s been known to work effectively. The pea works as a laxative and clear a betta’s gut.Simply grab a fresh pea (make sure it hasn’t been exposed to pesticides), boil it, peel the skin off, then chop it into small pieces so that they are bitesize for your betta. A betta might not always eat the pea, but keep trying until he or she does. Be sure to take any uneaten pea out of the aquarium as they can decompose and cause excess waste.It’s worth noting that a pea doesn’t need to be a regular part of your betta’s diet and you may only wish to feed it a pea if you think the fish is constipated. It’s fine to do once, maybe twice a week, but it would be unhealthy to do it more regularly than that.

How many pellets do I feed my betta fish a meal?

Once you have selected a diet for your betta, it is critical that the container is stored properly and replaced every 6 months. We have NEVER seen a betta actually finish a container of food. Since pellet size varies so widely, it is recommended that you feed the amount of pellets that would theoretically fit inside your fish’s eyeball per meal. This could be as few as 2 or 3, or up to 6 or 7, depending on the brand you choose. You do not need to soak your fish’s pellets prior to feeding. All fish can easily eat dry pellets and soaking only decreases their nutritional content.

How often do you feed a betta fish a day?

Starting with at least two meals a day, provided your tank is at the correct temperature, space your meals at least 6-8 hours apart. You can feed up to three meals a day if your fish is currently breeding or at the warmer end of the temperature range (80-82F/27-28C). Be sure to spread more frequent meals out 4-6 hours apart. This will prevent too much food from being in the intestines at once. Knowing your tank temperature is critical for good betta health. Do not trust your heater to work without checking it. Make sure your tank has a reliable thermometer and always have a spare heater handy.

How Often Do You Feed A Betta Fish?

Every betta fish food container shows the manufacturer’s recommended feeding amounts, but these can be very misleading. Overfeeding your fish can cause serious health problems for your pet, as well as polluting the aquarium water, and increasing the bioload on your filtration system.So, how often should you feed your betta fish?

Daily Feeding?

Some bettas are greedy and will eat as much as you’re prepared to offer them. That’s probably because wild bettas have to grab food while they have the chance. For example, a single mosquito landing on the water could be the only food a betta gets for a couple of days, so these fish tend to make the most of every feeding opportunity.Many owners dote on their pets, giving the fish treats and as much food as the creatures will eat. Unfortunately,I recommend

Fasting

Once your betta has eaten, it takes time for the food to be processed by his digestive system before the waste matter passes through him. Live and frozen food contain virtually zero dry matter, and so it passes relatively quickly and smoothly through the betta’s gastrointestinal tract. However, dried pellets and flakes swell markedly when exposed to water, which means that they pass slowly through the fish, sometimes accumulating and causing blockages.A very effective way of preventing that from happening is to starve your betta for one day per week. That’s not being cruel to your pet, but it’s for his own good! In nature, a betta can survive for up to two weeks with no food whatsoever, so a day’s fast will not harm your pet.

Vacation Feeders

One fasting day per week is fine for your betta, but what can you do if you’re away on vacation or on business?A high-quality vacation fish feeder is a great solution to that potential problem, and can even be a lifesaver for fish keepers who work odd hours and shifts, meaning that they’re not around to feed their fish at regular times.

What Is A Vacation Feeder?

A vacation fish feeder is an automated, programmable food dispensing system that you can set to feed your betta at pre-set times throughout each day. Vacation feeders are generally battery-operated or powered via a mains connection. Of the two options, battery-operated feeders are the most popular, as they cannot fail in the event of a power outage. However, you do need to remember to recharge the feeder’s battery regularly.You can choose feeders that have multiple food containers, which you fill with your betta’s food. The feeder has a timer that rotates the food containers, dropping the food into your fish’s aquarium at a preselected time, or times, of your choice. Most automated fish feeders can dispense dry food, thawed frozen food, and even live food.

What Do Betta Fish Eat?

Wild bettas eat mostly meaty prey, such as insect larvae and water-bound insects that they take from the water surface. However, they also eat a small amount of plant matter. So, your pet betta needs a high-protein diet, and he won’t get the nutritional balance that he needs from tropical flakes alone.

Check Product Labels

When you buy flake or pellet betta food, always check the list of ingredients on the packet. The ingredients at the top of the list should be meat-based, and the

Floating Pellets

Take a look at your betta fish, and you’ll see that he has an upturned mouth filled with tiny white teeth. That conformation equips your fish perfectly for feeding on the surface of the water. Also, the betta’s sharp teeth ensure that any insects the fish grabs won’t be able to escape.For that reason, you should

Beware Of Fillers

One reason that bettas suffer from health problems such as bloat and constipation is that they have a short digestive tract. That makes it difficult for the fish to digest “fillers,” including cereals that are used in many pellet and flake foods.These filler products contain no nutritional value and are only used to pad out the product in place of more expensive fish and meat. So, when choosing betta food, avoid anything that contains high volumes of fillers.

Different Types Of Betta Foods

There’s a wide range of betta foods that you can feed your pet to provide him with a balanced, nutritious diet.

Fish Flakes

The main drawback to feeding flakes is that they tend to sink once wet, and some bettas won’t eat flake foods at all.

Baby Pellets

Baby pellets are made specifically with a betta fish’s requirements in mind. The pellets are packed with all the protein and nutritional ingredients that your fish needs for good health, and they also have an all-natural, color-enhancing additive to make your betta’s colors really pop.Crucially, baby pellets are just the right size for a betta’s tiny mouth, and they float too, reducing waste and allowing your fish plenty of time to eat his meal.

Betta Pellets

Betta pellets are a very popular variety of fish food that is readily available from all good fish stores.Pellet food for bettas should be designed to float on the water surface, but it’s a good idea to soak the pellets before offering them to your pet so that you can more accurately gauge the volume of food he’s getting, thus preventing overfeeding.

Freeze-Dried Food

If you don’t like the idea of feeding your betta live foods, freeze-dried products offer a wonderful alternative. Freeze-dried bloodworms and brine shrimp are a perfect addition to your fish’s diet, being packed with protein and guaranteed not to contain the parasites that sometimes come with live foods.The main drawback of feeding freeze-dried food is that it has been stripped of moisture and may contain stabilizing additives too. I recommend that you soak freeze-dried foods in a small amount of tank water before feeding your fish to increase the moisture in the food, which helps to prevent bloating.Freeze-dried foods make an ideal treat, but they shouldn’t form the mainstay of your fish’s diet, as they don’t have a sufficient nutritional balance and can cause bloating if fed in large quantities.

Frozen Food

Frozen food is an extremely convenient way of introducing some high-quality meaty protein into your betta’s diet. You can buy a wide variety of frozen foods, including bloodworms, daphnia, brine shrimp, mosquito larvae, and tubifex worms, all of which will be greatly appreciated by your betta.Frozen foods come conveniently packaged in cubes that you can store in your freezer until you want to use them. Simply remove a cube from the package, thaw it in a little tank water, and then feed it to your fish.

Live Food

In nature, most of the betta fish’s diet consists of insects and insect larvae. You can replicate that in the captive environment by feeding your betta with live food. Most fish stores sell some live foodstuffs, and if you want to you can even raise your own at home.

Mosquito Larvae

Mosquito larvae form a major part of a wild betta’s diet, and your tank-kept pet will love them too. You can raise mosquito larvae at home, using a starter culture kit.

Bloodworms

Bloodworms are not truly worms but are actually midge fly larvae. These wriggling little creatures live in pools of stagnant water and ponds and form much of a wild betta’s diet. However, you should only include bloodworms as a treat for your captive betta rather than his main food, as although bloodworms are rich in iron, they lack amino acids.

Wingless Fruit Flies

Wingless fruit flies can be grown at home, simply by breeding them in a small container. Never take flies from nature, as they may be carrying diseases that could harm your pet.

Brine Shrimp

Brine shrimp can also be raised at home in a DIY brine shrimp hatchery. These tiny crustaceans contain vitamins, proteins, and important amino acids that combine to provide your fish with plenty of nutritious protein, and more.

Mysis Shrimp

Mysis shrimp are great food for bettas. The shrimp’s exoskeleton contains lots of fiber, which aids the digestion of protein in the betta’s diet. Also, these tiny creatures are packed with amino acids and moisture, both of which are vital for healthy fish.

How Much Should You Feed Your Betta Fish?

As mentioned previously in this guide, bettas have very small stomachs and a short digestive tract. A betta’s tiny stomach is roughly the same size as his eye, so you can see that it doesn’t take much for your fish to be overfed.Dry foods, including flakes and pellets, swell to double their size when exposed to moisture. So, feed your fish only tiny amounts to prevent him from becoming bloated or constipated, both of which are serious health issues for bettas.Feeding live and frozen foods are a good idea, as these closely mimic what your fish would eat in the wild and are what his digestive system has evolved to process. Therefore, adding small amounts of these foods as a regular component of your pet’s diet can help to keep your betta’s gastrointestinal tract in good working order.

Betta Fish Feeding Chart

Here’s a handy chart, showing you when and what to feed your betta to keep your pet healthy and happy without overfeeding him.If you’re raising betta fry, you’ll need to feed them more frequently, ideally two to four times per day.

Why Won’t Your Betta Fish Eat?

Without a good diet, your fish won’t thrive, so, if your betta refuses to eat or his appetite seems to be dwindling, you must investigate.

Stress

Many new owners get their betta home and install him in a perfectly decorated and equipped tank only to find that their new pet won’t eat. With bettas, a loss of appetite or a lack of interest in food is not uncommon and is generally caused by stress.The introduction of new tank mates or even cleaning your betta’s aquarium can also stress him, with the result that he won’t eat.

Water Conditions And Temperature Shock

Dirty tank water that has

How Old Is Your Betta?

Older fish are less active and require less food. In captivity, bettas have an average lifespan of between three and five years. So, if your pet is at the top end of that range, don’t be too surprised if he becomes quieter, and his appetite becomes less.

Sickness And Disease

When a previously healthy fish stops eating, and you’ve ruled out the aforementioned problems, it’s likely he has a health issue. So, look out for symptoms of a disease, and treat the problem with the right medication immediately.

How Often Do You Feed a Betta Fish?

It’s recommended to feed your betta fish two times a day. You’ll avoid overfeeding your betta but you’ll also keep your fish alive and healthy, and aquarium water clean.

How Much To Feed A Betta Fish

Besides learning the feeding frequency of betta fish, there’s another question many people don’t know an answer to, which is “How much to feed your betta?” The food quantity-wise answer primarily depends on how bloated your betta looks.If your betta looks normal, you can continue with the same feeding routine, and if it’s bloated, you should take care of it so cut down on quantity.It’s essential to know that bettas’ feeding time lasts for about two minutes since their digestive tracts are very small. Because of their small digestive tracts, bettas can’t process fillers like corn and wheat and may not react very well to these.Betta fish in the wild tend to eat quite irregularly. Therefore, skipping a meal won’t harm your fish, but you should always observe your fish to better learn how frequently you should feed a betta fish. Taking good care of your fish is crucial, and you should help your betta get rid of the piled-up toxins in its body.To do so, you should give it a break from food every once in a while.Your betta needs to clear its system from toxins before having another meal and to give your bettas a meal break, all you have to do is give it food only once a day or even skip an entire day. After taking care of the toxins, you can get them back to their usual feeding routine.

What Can You Feed A Betta Fish?

In the wild, bettas survive on insects which classifies them as carnivores. When feeding them in captivity, you must know how frequently you should feed a betta fish, but you also need to know that you need to provide them with protein-rich foods. In addition, you need to provide your betta with moisture and fiber as it takes care of its digestion.All betta keepers need to ensure that their pets get food rich in protein, fiber, fat, calcium, vitamins, carbohydrates, and phosphorous. Freeze-dried foods, live or frozen food, pellets, and fish flakes have all these ingredients.However, make sure you don’t purchase flakes made for other tropical fish. Many pellets and flake foods meant for different types of fish contain fillers that may cause constipation and other digestive issues to your betta. In addition, they don’t provide any nutritional benefits and they contribute to more waste in your tank.Here we’ll mention some of the best foods available for your betta fish:

Fish Flakes

Fish flakes are packed with vital Omega 3 and 6 nutrients that fish require for maintaining their overall health. Additionally, fish flakes also contain beta-carotene found in salmon. Beta-carotene is a natural color enhancer that provides betta fish with vibrant colors that made them famous worldwide.Even though fish flakes are the most common fish food, they’re not expensive, making them a perfect solution for any budget.When feeding flakes to your betta for the first time, give them only a small amount of flakes and keep a watchful eye to see if your pet eats the flakes or not, and that way, you’ll learn how frequently you should feed a betta fish with flakes.

Bloodworms (Frozen Food)

In case there’s enough space within your home to freeze, store, and hold bloodworms, your betta will be thrilled as bloodworms are a fantastic treat your fish will appreciate. Besides you’d need to store them in your home, bloodworms are a great source of energy, unlike any other food, and they’ll help your pet grow and live a healthy life.Before feeding your fish with frozen bloodworms, the only thing you need to do is to defrost the amount needed for a meal. Even though frozen bloodworms aren’t as cheap as some other food types, you can easily store them for a long time. Never give your betta frozen food as it can cause severe problems to their health.You can find bloodworms in various sizes, and they’re great for other fish in your fish tank. Bloodworms are usually given as a reward or treat, but not as regular food. They’re the perfect meal replacement or if you want to improve your betta’s vitamin intake.

Freeze-Dried Foods

Like with any frozen food, you may also buy and store freeze-dried foods for your pet. This food type is the best for all types of saltwater and freshwater fish because they’re rich in protein, and protein is a vital nutrient that all fish require to stay healthy.It’s possible to freeze and defrost dried foods, but do it in small batches so you’d have the right amounts you need every time.

Betta Fish Pellets

The most common betta fish food available in today’s market is betta fish pellets. They come with different high-quality ingredients that will help take good care of your fish and give it a healthy diet so it could live longer. The best pellets available have fewer fillers, so that’s something you should go for.Some betta fish pellets can expand once they’re soaked in aquarium water. Therefore, be careful when feeding your betta with pellets as you don’t want them to grow in your pet’s digestive tract. Soak them outside the tank water and let them expand first before releasing them into the aquarium for your betta to eat.Once you’ve selected a diet for your betta fish, you must store the food container properly and replace it every six months because, believe it or not, we’ve never seen a betta finish an entire food container within six months.Since numerous pellet sizes are available, here’s a tip on how many pellets you should feed your betta per meal. Theoretically speaking,There’s no need to soak most of the pellets in water before feeding your fish because soaking them in water decreases the pellet’s nutritional value. However, if the pellets you bought are expandable when they come into contact with water, disregard this rule.Contrary to popular belief, betta fish can eat other types of food including some human food. However, there are numerous small things you should keep in mind. Like humans and most animals, taking good care of betta fish requires them to have a diverse diet.Therefore, when it comes to feeding your betta with human food, it all depends on the quantity, frequency, and type of human food you provide them with.As a responsible betta fish keeper, you’d want to ensure you feed your pet with best and most appropriate foods like something they’d get outside their tank and in their home habitat. Therefore, serving your betta with small portions of steak leftovers isn’t the best idea for your betta’s health.Most people feed their bettas with human food when they run out of regular betta fish food, which shouldn’t be standard practice. Feeding your betta with human foods is similar to giving it commercial food, meaning you have to use food with little to no fillers or additives.Moreover, the human food you feed your betta has to provide your fish with nutrients their diet recommends so they’d live longer in your tank. Human food should never become a replacement for betta’s traditional food, and it should be considered a treat or a supplement to their regular diet.

Human food you

In addition, it’s essential to scoop out and remove any leftover human food pieces from the aquarium within 30 minutes. That’ll help keep your fish tank clean and bacteria-free.

What Do You Feed A Baby Betta Fish?

You should feed a baby betta wish with different items making its diet diverse. These items include foods like live white worms, live blackworms, live tubifex worms, live mosquito larvae, etc. Nonliving foods you can feed fry bettas include frozen brine shrimp, crushed pellets, freeze-dried tubifex worms, etc.If you’re unsure how often do you feed a betta fish as a fry, you should consider some facts. The feeding frequency of fry betta fish differs from when they’re adults. You need to feed baby betta fish with more fats and protein than the adults require and feed it three to five times a day with tiny meals.In addition, you can provide fry bettas with food for any baby fish up until they reach four to six months of age.

How To Feed A Betta Fish When On Vacation

You can feed a betta fish when on vacation in several ways. You can place a feeder fish in the tank or get an automatic fish feeder for your tank. Additionally, you can put a food block into the tank that will dissolve in water over time, or you can ask someone to keep your betta fed on your behalf.The easiest way to keep your fish fed while on vacation is to use vacation feeders. Vacation feeders are available in sizes that’ll cover you for a weekend (2-day), 7-day, and 14-day vacation.There are two basic types of vacation feeders. One type has the food within a gel, while the other has the food embedded in a calcium block. Both types will dissolve when they come into contact with tank water while slowly releasing food particles to your fish.

Why Won’t Your Betta Fish Eat?

Sometimes your betta might not eat its food, and it can be pretty worrying. In other cases, your fish might be eating without you realizing it. Nevertheless, here are some of the situations to consider:

Your Betta Is Fussy

If you’re feeding your betta a specific type of food for a while and then swap it, your pet may not like the new food, and chances are it’ll ignore it.

Your Pet Doesn’t Know It’s Food

Another reason your betta might not eat (usually when it’s new to the tank) is that it doesn’t realize that food is the thing you’re putting into the aquarium. This usually happens with flakes and pellets.

You’re Feeding Your Pet Too Much

Sometimes it happens that your betta fish is eating, but you do not realize it happens. A betta’s stomach is no bigger than its eye, and if you give your fish too much food, it may struggle to eat it all. Ultimately, it comes down to knowing how frequently you should feed a betta fish and the right amounts of food it needs.

FAQs:

Yes, you can feed a betta fish goldfish food as they can eat it and digest it. However, don’t provide goldfish food to your betta frequently, as it doesn’t have all the necessary nutrients for betta’s diet.No, you can’t feed a betta fish tropical flakes for other tropical fish because they lack the protein that bettas require in their diet.Betta fish can go without food for 14 days. However, don’t leave your fish without food for longer than five days. A weekend trip should be fine, but you should find someone to keep your fish fed and manage your tank if you’re planning a more extended vacation.