How Much Is a Bale of Hay?

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This is a question that more than 7443 of our readers have been asking us! Luckily, we have found the most appropriate information for you!

There are many reasons to buy hay for your animals, but how much does a bale of hay cost? Where can you find the best deal on this type of animal feed? Read on to learn more about the price and various options available.

We have lived in a few different states including Colorado, Virginia and Upstate New York and the prices can range quite a bit for various reasons. Growing up I remember haying the very fields we now own and it can be a lot of fun and you also manage to get a great workout. Some of these include a drought or flooding along with what kind of hay you get where a bale of alfalfa is going to cost quite a bit more. If this isn’t an option make sure you buy and stock up in the early season. Help your local farmer hay and they are sure to give you a big discount and guess what you get a great workout in the meantime. If local is just too expensive or there isn’t enough search out of state maybe even have it delivered might be worth it for the better quality too. You need to find out what is worth it, might be easier and more convenient to spend a buck or two more to have a farmer next door with easily accessible hay. We have a miniature horse that gets more hay and less time on the pasture because he can over do it and gain weight quickly when on grass. You may need to look to supplement with some alfalfa which is legume hay meaning lots more protein and calories. Legumes are a plant family that includes alfalfa, clover, and birdsfoot trefoil hay. This increased concentration of the amino acid arginine leads to an increase in energy for horses eating legume fodder; however it can also lead to problems with obesity if they consume too much food at once – especially during summer months when feeding limits may be lower due to heat stress on animals who do not have access to fresh water sources like rivers or lakes where they can take dips from time-to-time while grazing.” If you are looking to feed your horse some high-quality food that will provide plenty of nutrients as well as ample fiber, protein, and calcium then alfalfa might be a great option! This legume produces small flowers that bloom bright yellow clustered at the end of stem branches once seed pods form they extend away from its stalk looking like a bird’s foot (hence their name). Legumes offer many benefits over other types including increased digestibility which means horses can get nutrients faster without as much effort on your part or theirs–meaning you will need less fodder than what you would have needed if feeding only grass hays even though it may be easier to eat because it has lower lignin There are a number of different types available, but what’s most important is finding something your specific animal needs- for example whether they have allergies or if you live in an area without much variety that might be more challenging on their digestion. Timothy is typically a finer textured grass than other types of hays which means it has higher protein content but also better balance in nutrients such as calcium and fiber. Coastal Bermuda Grass has short, fine blades of green that make it lower in protein than other types of hay but still provides an excellent source to keep your horse healthy. It has a different appearance from timothy and orchard hays as well–its leaves are wider with more variety in their color. Though brome lacks calcium when compared to legume-based hay, its high protein content makes this one worth considering for livestock that needs just some extra energy before winter comes around again! Orchard hay usually has thicker blades than the other varieties, but sometimes it’s also softer in texture and lower in protein compared to timothy or clover. Another characteristic about this tall green variety is that it does well with cooler temperatures – which for horses means less stress on their bodies during feeding times! Oats are cut at the milk-soft dough stage of their growth cycle, giving them more nutrients than other types of grasses which make oats an attractive choice to use in your animal’s diet as they have protein that is good for muscle building and fatty acids that keep teeth healthy while also boosting brain function. Ryegrass Rye grass is excellent for horses, but it’s important to keep the watering and irrigation on point. The plant can suffer if there are too many moisture fluctuations or a drought occurs because rye tends to be sensitive in those cases. Hay and pasture should always be tested for this fungus before feeding them to horses in order to prevent any problems from occurring! If you find any discrepancies let us know and send us an email at admin@horsefaqs.com so we can look into and update our records. You are better off buying by the ton in Alaska if possible and you have room for storage as it will save you cost and make sure you have it in stock. Always look for round bales that are stored inside for horses and usually at least an alfalfa mix they will do better on. California is another state that is great to buy by ton and will be more affordable with the bulk discount rate. You may get a different price depending on what type you purchase, and if it comes from an online retailer or local farmer. A square bale will typically be more expensive than round ones sold by weight instead of volume which is usually cheaper per pound but not always. Round bales in Connecticut aren’t as plentiful from our research but the average price was around $30-35 for standard quality and $50+ for alfalfa. You may get a different price depending on what type you purchase, and if it comes from an online retailer or local farmer. Hawaii is an expensive state to live in, and the hay is no different which costs about $7-10 for first cutting and $12-19 for alfalfa square bales. The cost for bales will depend on the size and type of hay that they have available in their inventory. The average cost for a square bale of hay is $3-5 per and around $6-8 for alfalfa high quality. The price will depend on type and availability so it is hard to pinpoint an average value that you should expect when buying a bale in this region. The cost of hay in Kansas can range anywhere from $4-12 per square bale with the lower being something like timothy first cutting and the upper side being alfalfa. The price will depend on type and availability so it is hard to pinpoint an average value that you should expect when buying a bale in this region. Maine is a smaller north eastern state and as such, it has a lot of hay shipped in from other places. They can be one of the more expensive states to get hay because there just isn’t enough to go around so a lot is imported which can make prices go up. It can range from $4-7+ for horse quality square bales the higher side being second cutting and alfalfa. In Missouri hay is very affordable for most where the lower horse quality bales start out at $4 onwards up to $7.50+. The cost for a bale of hay in Montana is more affordable then we thought it would be with much tougher winters being up there. The cost for a bale of hay in Nebraska is also close to the other states on the average side. Round bales range from $40-$65+ so if you think your local prices are too high definitely look to shop around the state. The cost for a bale of hay in West Virginia is close to the other states we have looked at so far.

How much does a bale of hay cost 2021?

What Is the Average Price for a Bale of Hay? On average, a bale of hay costs around $15. For example, two wired Alfalfa Hay bales typically run high, costing $19.95 apiece, whereas bermudagrass is only $8.75. Timothy Hay is the most expensive, typically costing at least $20 a bale.

How much does a 1200 lb bale of hay cost?

As you can see, the cost or value of the primary nutrients in a typical bermudagrass round bale is $20.30. If you add to this the cost of baling, about $15 per round bale, then your cost for a 1,200-pound round bale is now $35.30.

How many pounds is a bale of hay?

A standard two-string square hay bale weighs between 40 and 75 pounds ; a three-string square bale weighs over 100 pounds, and some as much as 140 pounds; the average round hay bale weighs about 1,250 pounds, but their weight varies greatly from 563 to 1,584 pounds.

Hay is one of the most common feed for horses. It provides high nutritive content, is widely available, and horses enjoy it. Grass or legumes are cut and dried, resulting in the delicious and versatile feed. Most of the time, horse owners buy tons of hay and store it over months or even years to provide good nutrition to horses all year round. And even if you prefer to purchase hay every month, you still need to buy large amounts at once for your horses. But how much does a bale of hay cost? Let’s look at some current hay price numbers.

If you want to know the prices for each type of hay and variety, you can visit a website of any company in the area and get a rough estimate. Apart from that, for imported types of hay, demand in their countries of origin can also result in limited supply and higher costs. Delivery costs vary as well, and some farmers may choose to grow less hay in favor of other crops, thus decreasing availability. Keep in mind when you are choosing hay to check its maturity, nutritional content, softness, and smell.

Hay is something that you need to feed your horses. Because horses are so large and can eat so much, you need to have a thorough budget that accounts for all of their snacks and food, like hay. It can be tough to estimate how much hay costs if you’ve never bought it before.

For example, two wired Alfalfa Hay bales typically run high, costing $19.95 apiece, whereas bermudagrass is only $8.75. A lot of people don’t realize that there are different types of hay. Many other animals eat Timothy Hay, such as rabbits and guinea pigs. In order to determine the grade, sellers will look at the hay color, freshness, moisture, and nutrients. Even though pay grade might not seem like a big deal to you, it can actually impact your horse’s health dramatically. The various grade levels come with the different amounts of vitamins and nutrients, which are all necessary for the horse to live healthfully. Image Credit: matthiasboeckel, PixabayIf you are on a budget, you may be looking for ways to get good hay for cheap. For example, many people who live in pastureland will split collected hay bales with neighboring farms for free or very little. Image Credit: Qwas, Pixabay Once you have selected a proper hay type, you need to know how much to get. In other words, you may want to check out local prices near you to give yourself a better idea of how much you will pay for the hay. Oliver (Ollie) Jones – A zoologist and freelance writer living in South Australia with his partner Alex, their dog Pepper, and their cat Steve (who declined to be pictured). Ollie, originally from the USA, holds his master’s degree in wildlife biology and moved to Australia to pursue his career and passion but has found a new love for working online and writing about animals of all types.

As I have just become a proud horse owner, the next thing I was concerned about was feeding this beautiful creature. I have no pasture for horses to graze on, so, it started to bother me how much hay horses eat? How much does a round bale of hay cost? All these questions needed answering, I went on a quest to find some.

Finding round hay bale cost was by far the most difficult as it was hard to get to a definitive figure. Even the horse owners with well-developed pasture resort to buying a cut of hay for fodder inventory during the spell of dry weather. For instance, a horse owner can not expect grass hay and alfalfa bale to have the same purchase price. With all the expenses of keeping a horse, most equine keepers are always on the lookout for hacks and tricks to cut down on upkeep costs. Hay bales sold in feed stores are generally expensive than the ones bought directly. You can get good deals, avail discounts which is almost impossible to get in retail stores. Provided by Standlee, Tractor Supply offers huge discounts on bulk purchases. The time of year it is bought affects the prices to a greater extent. Generally, hay bales are more in demand during the dry weather, winter, or when there is not enough pasture to graze. Each state or area has different prices set for square and round hay bale. Putting it all together, Foliage, an indispensable part of a horse’s diet, is necessary when there is not sufficient grass available or pasture to graze on.

A Comprehensive Guide: How Much Does A Bale Of Hay Cost

Hay cost fluctuate and it can be a very frustrating subject. Just the year before I am writing this we suffered somewhat of a drought here in New York state like nothing I have ever seen before. So hay prices went up along with the quality and quantity going down especially the further we went into winter. So the next season we made it a point to getting back to stocking up on hay.

When Is The Best Time To Get Hay?

The absolute best time to get hay is right after the farmer is done cutting have them deliver right then and there. That is because it is easier on them since they won’t have to store in their mow and only handle once. You can get for much cheaper as well. If this isn’t an option make sure you buy and stock up in the early season.When you get into later months and winter hay prices almost always have a tendency to sore.

How To Find Good Cheap Hay?

Start local and expand from there. Help your local farmer hay and they are sure to give you a big discount and guess what you get a great workout in the meantime. Speak for as much hay as you can so you can get it at a much cheaper price as well.If local is just too expensive or there isn’t enough search out of state maybe even have it delivered might be worth it for the better quality too. We know of people that live in Maryland, but they get all their hay in Pennsylvania because it is cheaper and better quality.You need to find out what is worth it, might be easier and more convenient to spend a buck or two more to have a farmer next door with easily accessible hay.Your third would be if you own land to have it hayed by a farmer and you keep a percentage of that hay. The old family farm we bought has 15 acres of pasture so about 4 or 5 acres we have hayed and we split with the farmer 50/50.

Quality VS Quantity

The higher the quality the higher the price of course, but you need to know your limits with your horse. If all your horse gets is hay then yes you will want a higher quality hay most of the time if you are riding them. We cycle where we get higher quality hay in the winter time like a 2nd cutting and first cutting that is more like a filler in the summer time.This will have to be a balance based on how active your horse is what breed they are among other factors. The best place to go for this advice is probably more so your local vet. We have both quarter horses and appendix quarter horses so we feed different based on what they need. The older they are especially with appendix we have found it is tough for them to keep weight on. So we switch to sweet feed and and also feed more alfalfa horse quality hay than we do the other horses.We have a miniature horse that gets more hay and less time on the pasture because he can over do it and gain weight quickly when on grass. So we cycle between 1st and 2nd cutting with him based on the amount of time he is in the pasture.

So what type of hay should you use?

Start with any local horse quality hay as a baseline which will be an orchard, timothy or bermudagrass hay. Try to get first cutting but if you get fresh first cutting you should be fine.See how the horses like it and maintain their weight. You may need to look to supplement with some alfalfa which is legume hay meaning lots more protein and calories. So you have to be careful with this and you may want to ask your vet about maybe doing alfalfa pellets instead.

Legume Hay

Legumes are a plant family that includes alfalfa, clover, and birdsfoot trefoil hay. Legume hay is higher in protein than grass-based hays such as timothy or oat straws. This increased concentration of the amino acid arginine leads to an increase in energy for horses eating legume fodder; however it can also lead to problems with obesity if they consume too much food at once – especially during summer months when feeding limits may be lower due to heat stress on animals who do not have access to fresh water sources like rivers or lakes where they can take dips from time-to-time while grazing.”

Alfalfa

Alfalfa hay is the most common legume for horses, and one of the more popular choices in America. If you are looking to feed your horse some high-quality food that will provide plenty of nutrients as well as ample fiber, protein, and calcium then alfalfa might be a great option!

Clovers

Clover hay is a great source of energy, protein and fiber. However, if it molds the horse will experience nausea as well as slobbering and bleeding in their mouth. Clover plants usually have three leaves but they can range anywhere from two to six depending on what type you are looking at; most commonly clover has been mixed with other grasses for better nutrition so that there’s not only one species dominating this nutritious foodstuff.

Birdsfoot Trefoil

Birdsfoot trefoil is a more resistant forage to negative soil conditions and moisture fluctuations. Birdsfoot trefoil grows from 2-3 feet tall, and thrives when mixed with grasses in the pasture mix of hay. This legume produces small flowers that bloom bright yellow clustered at the end of stem branches once seed pods form they extend away from its stalk looking like a bird’s foot (hence their name). Legumes offer many benefits over other types including increased digestibility which means horses can get nutrients faster without as much effort on your part or theirs–meaning you will need less fodder than what you would have needed if feeding only grass hays even though it may be easier to eat because it has lower lignin

Grass Hay

Grass hay comes in many varieties and the best hay can vary from horse to horse. There are a number of different types available, but what’s most important is finding something your specific animal needs- for example whether they have allergies or if you live in an area without much variety that might be more challenging on their digestion.

Timothy

Timothy hay, the go-to for most horse owners and their equine friends alike. Timothy is typically a finer textured grass than other types of hays which means it has higher protein content but also better balance in nutrients such as calcium and fiber.

Bermuda

Bermuda grass is a durable and flexible hay for horses. Coastal Bermuda Grass has short, fine blades of green that make it lower in protein than other types of hay but still provides an excellent source to keep your horse healthy. The most affordable type on the market, you can purchase this coastal bermuda at any feed store near you!

Brome

Brome grass is a common hay in Colorado, but it’s not often seen by people west of the Rockies. It has a different appearance from timothy and orchard hays as well–its leaves are wider with more variety in their color. Though brome lacks calcium when compared to legume-based hay, its high protein content makes this one worth considering for livestock that needs just some extra energy before winter comes around again!

Orchard

Orchard hay is another type of grass that can be a great alternative to traditional timothy. Orchard hay usually has thicker blades than the other varieties, but sometimes it’s also softer in texture and lower in protein compared to timothy or clover. Another characteristic about this tall green variety is that it does well with cooler temperatures – which for horses means less stress on their bodies during feeding times!

Oat

Oat hay is a nutritious option for horse feed and can be used alone or mixed with alfalfa. Oats are cut at the milk-soft dough stage of their growth cycle, giving them more nutrients than other types of grasses which make oats an attractive choice to use in your animal’s diet as they have protein that is good for muscle building and fatty acids that keep teeth healthy while also boosting brain function.

Ryegrass

Rye grass is excellent for horses, but it’s important to keep the watering and irrigation on point. The plant can suffer if there are too many moisture fluctuations or a drought occurs because rye tends to be sensitive in those cases.

Fescue Hay

Fescue grass is a tall, broad blade of grass that can be harmful to pregnant mares if it contains the fungal infection endophyte. Hay and pasture should always be tested for this fungus before feeding them to horses in order to prevent any problems from occurring!

Different Types Of Horse Hay

If you are going to be keeping your horse close and they will be on grass it is probably best to start with whatever a farmer has local first that is horse quality. You can ask them and they will more than likely know. Below are some examples and what they bring to the table for the horse.

Average Cost Of A Square Bale Of Hay Across The U.S.

We went out and gathered information from hay forums, websites like hay map, craigslist, Facebook Marketplace along with contacting many different farms across the country to see how much they charge or pay for hay. We used all this information to come up with these averages that we feel very confident in. If you find any discrepancies let us know and send us an email at admin@horsefaqs.com so we can look into and update our records.

Cost Of A Square Bale Of Hay In Alabama

Alabama is a state located in the southeastern United States. The average cost of bale hay in Alabama is $3-6 for an average square bale and $30+ per a standard round bale. With some sellers charging prices as high as $14+ per alfalfa square bale and $50+ for alfalfa round bale.

Cost Of A Square Bale Of Hay In Alaska

Alaska is a state located in the northwestern United States. The average cost of a square bale hay in Alaska ranges from $6 to $16 per square bale depending on quality and type. You are better off buying by the ton in Alaska if possible and you have room for storage as it will save you cost and make sure you have it in stock. Better to over stock on hay in Alaska then be left short. If you are paying by the ton you can expect to pay around $500-750 per ton depending on how close they are you may be charged a deliver charge as well. Round bales are around $80+ depending on quality and type. Always look local first.

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In Arizona

Arizona is a state located in the southwestern region of the United States. The average cost of bale hay in Arizona ranges from $5 to $10 per standard square bale, with some sellers charging prices as high as $16-18 or more per alfalfa bale.Arizona can be hit or miss from year to year. Your best bet might be ordering in bulk from out of state I know people that order it from New York that live in Tucson.

Cost Of A Square Bale Of Hay In Arkansas

Arkansas is a state located in the Southern region of the United States. The average cost of square bale hay in Arkansas ranges from $4 to $8 per square bale, with some sellers charging prices as high as $11-15 or more per alfalfa bale. Round bales were anywhere from $50-90 per depending on the quality. Always look for round bales that are stored inside for horses and usually at least an alfalfa mix they will do better on.

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In California

California is a state located in the Western region of the United States. The average cost for square bale hay in California ranges from $7 to $12 per bale, with some sellers charging prices as high as $15+ or more per alfalfa bale. California is another state that is great to buy by ton and will be more affordable with the bulk discount rate.

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In Colorado

Colorado is located in the Western region of the United States. The average cost for square bale hay in Colorado ranges from $5 to $7 for square bale, with some sellers charging prices as high as $12+ or more per alfalfa bale. Colorado can have its major ups and downs with hay I know from personal experience. They go through major droughts then you are looking at the top side of price. Most farmers are very efficient with their irrigation and watering supply though. We did find it tough to find the 2 tie 50 pound bales so it might be better to go with some round bales or 3 tie squares. A ton runs around $200-300 per. Rounds and 3 tie squares most farmers like to sell by the ton as well.

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In Connecticut

A square bale of hay averages about $3.50-$5 in the Connecticut area. If you are looking at alfalfa bales or something else with more protein will run around $7-9 per bale. You may get a different price depending on what type you purchase, and if it comes from an online retailer or local farmer. A square bale will typically be more expensive than round ones sold by weight instead of volume which is usually cheaper per pound but not always. Round bales in Connecticut aren’t as plentiful from our research but the average price was around $30-35 for standard quality and $50+ for alfalfa.

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In Delaware

A square bale of hay averages about $4-6 in the Delaware area. If you are looking at alfalfa bales or something else with more protein will run around $8-10 per bale. You may get a different price depending on what type you purchase, and if it comes from an online retailer or local farmer. Delaware is a small state so if you prices are high local don’t be afraid to look out of state.

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In Florida

A square bale of hay averages about $0.50-$75 in the Florida area. Again, this may differ depending on quality and where you’re purchasing it from so be sure to do your research before buying something that’s too expensive for what you want or need.

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In Georgia

A square bale of hay averages about $5 in the Georgia area where a square bale of high quality alfalfa will cost around $14+ a bale. Again, this may differ depending on quality and where you’re purchasing it from so be sure to do your research before buying something that’s too expensive for what you want or need. Round bales cost around $40 on average with Alfalfa rounds starting at around $50.

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In Hawaii

Hawaii is an expensive state to live in, and the hay is no different which costs about $7-10 for first cutting and $12-19 for alfalfa square bales. We didn’t find any prices for round bales as this will probably cost as much if not more because of transportation especially if you are looking island to island. These cost were local

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In Idaho

Idaho is a state with much less land but you can still find hay farms. The cost for bales will depend on the size and type of hay that they have available in their inventory. For instance, if someone has alfalfa or timothy square bales then it’ll be around $7-12 depending on how many bails there are. Native local grass will be around $4-7 per square bale. Round bales average around $35 for local hay and $50+ for high quality alfalfa rounds.

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In Illinois

Illinois is a large state with many different types of hay for sale. Depending on the type and availability, prices will range from $12-18 per bale depending on if they are square or round.The cost to buy a bale of hay can be anywhere between $65-$100 dollars in Illinois.

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In Indiana

Costs in Indiana are determined by the type and size of hay desired. The average cost for a square bale of hay is $3-5 per and around $6-8 for alfalfa high quality. A square bale will be cheaper than a round bale, but it all depends on what you’re looking to buy and how many horses you have. Round bales will be anywhere from $35-50+ depending on the quality you are looking for.

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In Iowa

In Iowa, the cost of hay can range anywhere from $4-12 per square bale. The price will depend on type and availability so it is hard to pinpoint an average value that you should expect when buying a bale in this region. The cost of a round bale is a little more expensive here then other parts of the country so it will range from $50-100+

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In Kansas

Kansas is a great state to live in surprisingly I know they allow homesteading where the state will pay you to live there. The cost of hay in Kansas can range anywhere from $4-12 per square bale with the lower being something like timothy first cutting and the upper side being alfalfa. The price will depend on type and availability so it is hard to pinpoint an average value that you should expect when buying a bale in this region. The cost of a round bale is around $50-65+

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In Kentucky

Kentucky is another great state to live in. They have a lot of different types of hay for sale and the prices can range from $3-7 per square bale depending on what type you are looking at. Round bales are a little on the pricey side starting at around $55-75+.

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In Louisiana

Louisiana can be a very expensive state for hay due to storms like the hurricanes they get hit with.The cost of hay starts at around $5-7+ per square bale reaching $7-10 for high quality 2nd cutting and alfalfa. Round bales will range from $25-40+ based on the horse quality of the hay.

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In Maine

Maine is a smaller north eastern state and as such, it has a lot of hay shipped in from other places. They can be one of the more expensive states to get hay because there just isn’t enough to go around so a lot is imported which can make prices go up. The cost for round bale starts at around $40 going up to $55+ per bale with square bales starting at $5+ for standard and 6+ depending on the higher horse quality.

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In Maryland

The cost for bale of hay in Maryland is a little more expensive than many other states. It can range from $50-65+ for round bales depending on what types you are getting and where they are coming from. For square bales it will range from $4-7+

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In Massachusetts

The cost for bale of hay in Massachusetts is slightly more expensive than many other states. It can range from $40-60+ for rounddepending on what quality you are getting where square bales will be around $6-8.

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In Michigan

The cost for a bale of hay in Michigan is less expensive than many other states. It can range from $4-7+ for horse quality square bales the higher side being second cutting and alfalfa. Rounds that are horse quality will come in at $50-60 normally.

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In Minnesota

The cost for bale of hay in Minnesota is less than the other states we have looked at so far. It can range from $3.50 to $5 for standard horse quality square bales. The high quality starting at $6 for second cutting. Round bales will cost you around $40-50.

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In Mississippi

The cost for bale of hay in Mississippi is close to the other states we have looked at so far. It can range from $5-8+ depending standard to alfalfa horse qualities. Round bales will be around $40-50.

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In Missouri

In Missouri hay is very affordable for most where the lower horse quality bales start out at $4 onwards up to $7.50+. Rounds will range from the lower side around $35 to $60+ so quite the disparity there.

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In Montana

The cost for a bale of hay in Montana is more affordable then we thought it would be with much tougher winters being up there. Square bales start at around $4.50 for decent horse quality hay to as high as $13 for your high quality stuff. Rounds get a little more expensive starting at $40 to a whopping $80+. So this will depending on where you live in Montana south vs north.

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In Nebraska

The cost for a bale of hay in Nebraska is also close to the other states on the average side. It can range from $6-10+ for lower quality hay and $10-16 for alfalfa and other high quality hay. Rounds will range from $40-60 per bale.

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In Nevada

The cost for a bale of hay in Nevada is on the higher side with lower horse quality coming in at around $8-15 with higher quality $16+. Round bales are on average around $60-65.

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In New Hampshire

The cost for a bale of hay in New Hampshire ranged around $5-10 for square bales and $55-90+ all depending on what happens during the year with weather and quality of hay you are looking for.

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In New Jersey

The cost for a bale of hay in New Jersey is actually more affordable than we thought square bales range from $4-12 so as you can see you need to shop around and might have to travel a bit. Buying in bulk will also save you quite a bit. Round bales will cost anywhere from $55-75+.

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In New Mexico

The cost for a bale of hay in New Mexico is very affordable with square bales starting at $4.50 but can get up to $20 a bale for high quality. So shop around check out the hay to make sure you like it. Round bales $40-80+.

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In New York

The cost for a bale of hay in New York is really affordable surprisingly. Some of the best hay in the country is arguably produced in this state. If you have land here you should be haying it yourself or splitting it up with somebody 50/50. Hay can range around $2.50-5 depending which cutting and quality you are looking for. Round bales are $25-40+.

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In North Carolina

The cost for a bale of hay in North Carolina ranges from $5-7 for low horse quality square bales to upwards of $10+. Round bales start at $25-55+.

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In North Dakota

The cost for a bale of hay in North Dakota starts at $4-10+ for square bales with rounds coming in at $38-45+. Shop around and maybe look out of state if prices are starting to sky rocket in your state. Buying in bulk is also a great option to keep costs down.

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In Ohio

The cost for a bale of hay in Ohio is is pretty cheaper for decent hay starting out at $3 up to $8 for good quality square bales. Round bales cost anywhere from $30-60.

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In Oklahoma

The cost for a bale of hay in Oklahoma ranges from $5-12 for square bales this will vary quite a bit based on the year and quality. Rounds average $40-50+ which is great for a high horse quality round bale.

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In Oregon

The cost for a bale of hay in Oregon is $5-7 for lower quality square bales with $7-10 for higher quality horse hay. Round bales will be anywhere from $30-80.

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In Pennsylvania

The cost for a bale of hay in Pennsylvania is very affordable ranging from $3-10 based on what type of horse quality hay you are looking for. Round bales are anywhere on the lower end for $25 to $30+.

Cost Of A Bale of Hay In Rhode Island

The cost for a bale of hay in Rhode Island is a little more pricey because if it being a smaller state so you can look into closer states like New York and ordering in bulk to get better quality hay. Square bales start at around $5-7+ with round bales coming in at $40-55+.

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In South Carolina

The cost for a bale of hay in South Carolina ranges from $5-14+ based on the horse quality hay you get. Round bales range from $30-40+ based on the cutting and quality.

Cost of A Bale Of Hay In South Dakota

The cost for a bale of hay in South Dakota is $5-7+ for some standard horse quality hay bales. Round bales range from $40-$65+ so if you think your local prices are too high definitely look to shop around the state.

Cost Of A bale Of Hay In Tennessee

The cost for a bale of hay in Tennessee is $4-5+ for standard quality squares with high quality coming in at $6-7+. Rounds in Tennessee range from $25-40+ which is very affordable. If locally your prices are much higher I would definitely look to shop outside your area.

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In Texas

The cost for a bale of hay in Texas is very affordable with squares starting out at $3 a bale with higher quality ranging from $7-10. Round b

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In Utah

The cost for a bale of hay in Utah is close to the other states we have looked at so far. It can range from $25-40+ depending on round or square and what types you are getting.

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In Vermont

The cost for a bale of hay in Vermont is close to the other states we have looked at so far. It can range from $25-40+ depending on round or square and what types you are getting.

Cost Of A Bale of Hay In Virginia

The cost for a bale of hay in Virginia is close to the other states we have looked at so far. It can range from $25-40+ depending on round or square and what types you are getting.

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In Washington

The cost for a bale of hay in Washington is close to the other states we have looked at so far. It can range from $25-40+ depending on round or square and what types you are getting.

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In West Virginia

The cost for a bale of hay in West Virginia is close to the other states we have looked at so far. It can range from $25-40+ depending on round or square and what types you are getting.”

Cost Of A Bale Of Hay In Wisconsin

The cost for a bale of hay in Wisconsin is close to the other states we have looked at so far. It can range from $25-40+ depending on round or square and what types you are getting.”

What Is the Average Price for a Bale of Hay?

On average,

Factors That Impact Cost

As you can see, the price for a bale of hay is kind of all over the board. Above, we primarily only mentioned the differences in price based on hay type. There are other factors that impact cost too. Let’s look at the four most important factors that can determine the cost for a bale of hay.

2. Hay Quality

Once again, the biggest factor that will impact hay bale cost is the hay type. A lot of people don’t realize that there are different types of hay. For example, Bermudagrass Hay tends to be the most affordable, whereas Alfalfa Hay and Timothy Hay are much more expensive.Timothy Hay is by far the most expensive option, and not just for horses. Many other animals eat Timothy Hay, such as rabbits and guinea pigs. Because of the quality and quantity of animals that need Timothy Hay, its price is much more expensive than other hay varieties.Interestingly, the best hay for horses is Alfalfa Hay. It has a high protein count, nearly double that of Timothy Hay and Bermudagrass Hay.Here is a breakdown of the four most popular types of hay for horses:

3. Foliage Type

Foliage type also impacts its price. Although it may seem like hay bales are simply made from the hay, they are made from a variety of different vegetation. For example, Timothy Hay and Bermudagrass Hay are considered grass hay. Alfalfa Hay, on the other hand, is a legume hay. Legume hay tends to have much more protein than grass hay.

4. Season

Finally, the last factor that majorly impacts the price is the season. During hay seasons, bales can be picked up from fields for about $1 or delivered for up to $3. During the offseason, you can easily expect to pay two to three times more for the same quality of bales.

Can I Find Hay Cheaper?

If you are on a budget, you may be looking for ways to get good hay for cheap. The best way to save on hay is to find local pastures near you. For example, many people who live in pastureland will split collected hay bales with neighboring farms for free or very little.You can also look at different sites online. For example, Hay Exchange offers bales of hay at a much more affordable price than you would get them otherwise.

How to Pick Hay For Your Horses

After learning about the average cost of different hay types, you might be wondering which hay you should select for your horses. Here are two tips for picking the right type and amount of hay for your horse.You need to begin by selecting a hay type that is suitable for horses. Alfalfa, Timothy, and Bermudagrass Hay are the best, but Alfalfa is by far the most superior because it has a higher protein count. If you cannot afford Alfalfa or Timothy Hay, Bermudagrass Hay will work too.In addition to looking at the hay type, look at the hay quality. You can do this by physically examining the hay and asking about the grade before buying it. Also, ask the seller if they have analyzed samples of the hay for the nutrient density. Most commercial sellers should have this information already available.Once you have selected a proper hay type, you need to know how much to get. Horses roughly eat 1% of their body weight in hay per day. This allows their digestion to perform correctly. With this estimate, that means that a horse that weighs 1,000 pounds should eat 10 pounds of hay a day. This would allow a regular 60-pound bale of hay to last six days.

Is High-Quality Hay Expensive?

Even the horse owners with well-developed pasture resort to buying a cut of hay for fodder inventory during the spell of dry weather. The average cost of a hay bale is about 8 dollars, however, this price fluctuates in relation to demand, location, season, climate, and type of hay.The quality of hay affects prices as much as it has an impact on nutrients supply. Nutrient-rich hay will cost more than standard hay. For instance, a horse owner can not expect grass hay and alfalfa bale to have the same purchase price. Here’s a price breakdown of different types of hay bales.These average prices are estimated from different online hay selling platforms, you may find bales of the above-mentioned hay types at different prices locally.

Hay Grade

If you can not find better hay locally, it is good to buy hay online. You can get good deals, avail discounts which is almost impossible to get in retail stores. Here are some organizations selling hay online.

Type Of Foliage

Hay bales are composed of different types of vegetation, therefore, the type of foliage used to make the hay bale has a significant impact on the cost of a bale.

Season

The time of year it is bought affects the prices to a greater extent. Generally, hay bales are more in demand during the dry weather, winter, or when there is not enough pasture to graze.

Karen Vaughn
I wonder what she means by "deplorable". Like sticking a cigar in your intern's vagina? That kind of deplorable? There is nothing so powerful as truth Zombie geek. Bacon geek. Web ninja. Hipster-friendly twitteraholic. Internet fanatic. Pop culture aficionado. Gamer. Interests: Painting and Drawing, Quilting, Playing Board Games
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