How Much Does a Horse Cost?

Anyone who owns a horse will probably tell you that the initial cost of the average riding horse is really only the tip of the iceberg. Keeping a horse is a luxury for many people. But how much does the ‘average’ horse cost? What’s the difference between a free horse, a $500 horse, a $5,000 horse and one that can cost well over the $10,000 or $20,000 mark?

You might also take on a horse with a health or soundness problem, which can cost you lots of money, even though the initial purchase price was low. Of course, there’s the exception to every rulethere are gems among lower-priced or giveaway horses, but it may take a keen eye and willingness to deal with difficult issues.

A cheap horse may be more expensive in the long run if you have to contend with vet bills, specialized shoeing , and paying trainers.

How much does a horse cost 2020?

Those looking for a first-time horse will probably need to have anywhere from $1,500 to $3,000 in their budget for the purchase. You may be able to find a gem for less than this, but having that amount will give you the greatest number of choices. The more you have to spend, the more choices you will have.

What is the cheapest horse?

The cheapest horse breeds on average are the Quarter horse, Mustang, Paint horse, Thoroughbred, and Standardbred. Though prices will vary depending on the horse, there are often many budget-friendly horses for sale within these breeds.

Horses are so much fun to own. They are interesting to look at, enjoyable to ride, and a joy to bond with. However, owning a horse comes with a great deal of financial responsibility. The purchase of the horse itself is just one minor cost to worry about.

Here is what you need to know about the cost of owning a horse both immediately and in the long run. Costs may greatly vary, depending on the age of the horse you obtain and where you happen to get it from.

Place an advertisement in your local newspaper, and contact 4H clubs to connect with horse owners looking to rehome their pets. Adopting a horse instead of buying one involves working with the humane society or another kind of animal rescue center. Credit: Margo Harrison, ShutterstockFood (Hay, Fruits, Veggies, Salt, etc.

First, your horse will likely need about $100 worth of dental care every year of their life. Scheduling checkups regularly is an important step that should be taken to catch problems early before they become too expensive or complicated to deal with. Credit: Olga_i, Shutterstock Horses should be provided with a deworming medication every two or three months, which costs about $15 each.

Vaccinations are typically administered twice a year, which includes boosters for diseases such as influenza and tetanus. It all depends on the genes, diet, health, happiness, and quality of life that a horse experiences. Insurance policies that cover medical emergencies, mortality, or both can be found through veterinarians and independent companies.

The cost of equine insurance is typically based on the value of the horse that will be covered. Image Credit By: ulleo, pixabay The typical horse can eat between $100 and $300 worth of hay bales each month throughout their lives. If owners do not choose to board their horses and instead keep them at home, fencing installation, maintenance, and repair costs are unavoidable.

Also, toys should be purchased and provided to horses for mental stimulation and exercise. You never know when an unexpected expense will arise, and even if there are no surprises, it can cost thousands of dollars each year just to meet the minimal needs of a horse. Too many financial variables may come into play that makes it impossible to meet the needs of a horse at any given time.

Renting a horse for occasional rides or taking a horseback tour once or twice a year might be a better option. However, you can save money by letting your horse free range for food instead of making them rely solely on you. Now you have a clear idea of how much it costs to own and care for a horse in the long term.

Deciding whether to purchase or adopt a horse is a big decision to make and one that should never be taken lightly. But the rewards of owning a horse are well worth the investment that they require, both emotionally and financially. Oliver (Ollie) Jones A zoologist and freelance writer living in South Australia with his partner Alex, their dog Pepper, and their cat Steve (who declined to be pictured).

Do you have pets? If you’re like many children around the world, you might have a pet dog or a cat. Maybe you even have something more exotic, like a turtle, lizard, or snake. If you live out in the country, though, you might have a pet you can ride! What are we talking about? A horseof course!

Since horses tend to eat a lot and require various types of vitamins and supplements, you can probably count on spending over $100 each month on food.

Owning a horse isnt quite as expensive as you might think but you should still be prepared to drop a few grand if you are looking for an equine member of the family. Its estimated that nearly 7.2 million Americans own horses. Before you put your money into your new four-legged companion, you may want to explore how much should be budgeted before you saddle up. For more general help with financial planning maybe to figure out how to save money to allow you to purchase your horse consider working with a financial advisor.

Remember that horses can get sick like humans and other animals, and will need proper treatment if this comes up, including emergency costs. You can buy a part of a racehorse, and that means you are in for potential profits as the horse races and wins prizes.

Smarty Jones, the winner of the 2004 Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes, was owned by a fractional ownership group. For instance, if you have the stable to house your horse, youll save thousands of dollars in boarding costs. A partial lease would let you ride the horse a few days a week while you pay the owner a fee for maintaining the rest of the cost.

Her writing has appeared in Wirecutter, Quartz, Bankrate, Credit Karma, Huffington Post and other publications.

How Upkeep Costs Affect Price

Poor hay crops and rising feed and fuel costs can affect the number of horses for sale and can affect the asking prices of those horses in any given year. The side effect of the banning of horses for meat slaughter is a lower price for some types of horses. This mainly affects horses that are elderly, unsound, young and/or untrained, but it does have a ripple effect on the general horse market.Those looking for a first-time horse will probably need to have anywhere from $1,500 to $3,000 in their budget for the purchase. You may be able to find a gem for less than this, but having that amount will give you the greatest number of choices. The more you have to spend, the more choices you will have.

The Cost of Ponies

Ponies might be smaller in stature than horses, but that doesn’t mean their purchase or upkeep costs are proportionally smaller.The cost of a good pony can be the same or higher than a horse. Expect prices for suitable first ponies to be about $1,000 and upwards.

The Real Cost of a Free Horse

A free horse will probably live up to the old adage, “Never look a gift horse in the mouth.” Usually, the horse will be a senior citizen, a youngster with poor prospects or little training, or a horse with behavioral issues. Yes, it’s possible to get a really great free horse—like a senior citizen who is level-headed and serviceably sound, whose owner just wants a nice retirement home for it. However, these horses are rare and there’s a possibility you’re taking on someone’s problem.You might also take on a horse with a health or soundness problem, which can cost you lots of money, even though the initial purchase price was low.

List of Horse Care Supplies and Cost

The first thing to think about is the actual cost of the horse itself. Costs may greatly vary, depending on the age of the horse you obtain and where you happen to get it from. If you are really lucky, you might spend nothing at all. If you are looking for a horse with a stellar bloodline, though, you can expect to pay upward of about $3,000-$5,000.It is possible to get a horse for free if you are willing to do the legwork, and if you are not concerned with how old the horse is. Instead, of going to a breeder or even a humane society, your task will be to find someone who is looking for a good home to send their horse to because they can no longer care for the horse themselves.Many people get too old to care for their horse safely or experience changes to their financial circumstances that keep them from being able to provide for their horse. In cases like these, horse owners are more worried about finding a safe and loving home for their horse than making money. Place an advertisement in your local newspaper, and contact 4H clubs to connect with horse owners looking to rehome their pets.Adopting a horse instead of buying one involves working with the humane society or another kind of animal rescue center. If horses are not common pets where you live, you may have to reach out to rescue centers outside of your community to find one that cares for homeless horses.You can expect to pay an adoption fee to help the rescue facility recover any costs they endured while fostering the horse before adoption. This fee can be anywhere from $25 to more than $500, depending on a variety of factors, including the length of time the horse has been housed, the type of horse they are, and whether the horse has any special needs.Buying a horse from a breeder is the costliest option but the most flexible. You will be paying for pedigree, showmanship, and breeder expertise. You can expect a horse to cost anywhere from $500 to more than $5,000 from a breeder. Pricing will vary from breeder to breeder, so comparison shopping is always a good idea.