How Much Does a Dog Cost per Year?

Dogs give a lot to us, from undying love, to messy kisses, to being the perfect companion to snuggle with. Taking care of a pup, however, also comes with responsibilities, including making sure you understand how much it could cost to take care of them. Read on to learn what costs are associated with owning a dog, and how much you should budget to ensure your pup stays happy and healthy.

Doing so is often also a requirement for getting prescriptions for dog parasite problems , like heartworm and flea/tick medication, which is crucial to keeping your pup happy and healthy. The cost of a routine wellness visit can vary drastically depending on where you live, but will likely fall within $45 to $85 per year.

To stay healthy, your pet will also need to take heartworm medication as well as flea and potentially tick prevention every month. Teeth brushing even if you do it yourself at home requires purchasing enzymatic dog toothpaste (which is usually poultry-flavored yum!) If they do happen, however, they come not only with a lot of pain and stress for you and your dog, but significant costs as well.

If you dont mind giving your dog a bath in your own home or backyard, the monthly cost for this might be limited to only a couple of grooming appointments a year to get a sanitary trim and make sure your pup can see through their furry eyebrows. If you travel or work a lot, you might also have to factor in doggie day care, dog walkers, and boarding into your monthly pup budget. These arent recurring costs, for the most part, though if youre like many pet parents, you might not be able to resist buying them a new toy once in a while.

The average yearly cost to own a dog ranges based on your location, your pet parenting style, and general budget restraints, but this article should give you a pretty good sense of what you’ll need and how often.

How Much Does owning a dog cost in the first year?

Your first year of owning a pet is often the most expensive due to one-time startup costs. Expect to pay anywhere from $1,500 to $2,000 during your first year of pet ownership. To start, adoption fees will vary depending on whether you adopt from a shelter, breeder or pet store.

How much does it cost to have a small dog per year?

According to the ASCPA, the cost of owning a dog per year is $1,001 for a small dog, $1,214 for a medium-sized dog, and $1,448 for a large pooch (this excludes one-time cost of spaying and neutering).

Owning a pet isn’t cheap: In a typical year, the average pet owner spends between $500 and $1,000 for a dog and more than $600 for a cat. If you’re considering adopting a pet, it’s good to have a handle on the costs involved in year one and beyond. Read on for an overview of some common expenses and tips for new pet owners.

Dog
Cat
Crate/cage
$35-$150
$35-$70
Training classes
$100-$400
N/A
Spay/Neuter
$200-$800
$200
Carrier bag
$40-$100
$60
Litter box
N/A
$25-$50
Collar/leash
$25-$50
$10-$20
Scratching post
N/A
$10-$20
Puppy pads
$50-$100
N/A Small to large-sized dog
Cat
Food
$200-$400
$200-$300
Litter
N/A
$200
Toys
$50-$100
$50
Treats
$50-$100
$50
Health insurance
$225
$175
Grooming
$200-$500
N/A
License
$15
$15
Recurring medical costs
$200-$500
$200-$300

Every pet owner’s specific expenses will vary, but this can help you plan ahead if you’re thinking of buying a dog or cat. While pet insurance can save you money, most policies require you to pay out-of-pocket and then provide qualifying reimbursements once you’ve met your deductible.

“Owning a pet is a privilege and should result in a mutually beneficial relationship,” according to the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA). But keep in mind that those benefits come with responsibilities.

“Owning a dog is a huge responsibility,” says Cassie Denger, a client relationship specialist at Fort Pitt Capital Group . That means you should factor in any puppy care costs alongside your other monthly expenses, such as groceries, gas and rent.

A one-time expense might be a medication for a temporary illness or supplies, such as food bowls or dog beds, that you wouldn’t replace every couple of weeks. If you’re worried about medical expenses, or are drawn to a breed that’s typically more prone to illness, you may also want to consider getting pet insurance, says Brandi Hunter, vice president of public relations and communications at the American Kennel Club . Veterinarians generally recommend buying pet insurance while your dog is young and healthy, especially since most plans cover pre-existing conditions.

Aim to have enough saved to cover at least three months’ worth of your future pet’s living expenses, prior to adopting or purchasing a dog.

We all expect to save and set aside money for big expenses, like a new car or the down payment on a house. But, what many of us dont consider, when were oohing-and-ahhhing over that adorable new puppy, is the actual cost of dog ownership.

Then theres licensing, collars, leashes , crates, training, supplements, dog walkers, and emergency vet fees, which Forbes took into account when coming up with its heart-stopping numbers. This age group also spends more on their dogs, with purchases of pet care items, toys, treats, and vet visits.

Be prepared to forego a few treats for yourself, and sock some money away to cover any eventualities that come along with owning a dog.

How much are adoption fees?

Your first year of owning a pet is often the most expensive due to one-time startup costs. Expect to pay anywhere from $1,500 to $2,000 during your first year of pet ownership.To start, adoption fees will vary depending on whether you adopt from a shelter, breeder or pet store. Generally, adopting from a shelter is the most affordable option and many initial expenses such as spays/neuters, vaccinations, microchips, and other veterinary visits are often included in the adoption fee. Standard shelter adoption fees generally range from about $100 to $700 for dogs and $30 to $300 for cats, according to the Animal Humane Society. Note that some animals may cost more if they have a particular medical condition or are a more exotic breed.When buying directly from a breeder or pet store, expect to pay more. In fact, according to PrudentPet Insurance, some dog breeds can cost as much as $14,000 to adopt. Pets from breeders typically come with their first set of shots included — but other vaccinations and procedures, including spaying and neutering, may not be included.

Common one-time expenses

There are plenty of one-time expenses that pop up when you buy a new dog or cat. These can include spaying or neutering, vaccinations, rabies shots, microchipping, licensing, training and pet supplies such as a crate, food bowls, leash, toys, brushes, litter boxes, litter and puppy pads.Here’s a breakdown from the ASPCA with average one-time costs you can expect to pay for a dog or cat:

Recurring annual costs of owning a pet

The average cost of owning a pet can range from $700 to $1,100 per year, depending on the type of pet and its size, according to the ASPCA. (Bigger animals typically eat more food.)Here’s a breakdown of typical yearly costs of owning a dog or cat:Be sure to also consider pet care expenses if you plan to travel and board your pet or hire a pet sitter. You might also need a dog walker while you’re at work or boarding a few times a week. These costs can vary, so be sure to shop around for a service you trust.Remember that these are just average costs. Every pet owner’s specific expenses will vary, but this can help you plan ahead if you’re thinking of buying a dog or cat.

Pet insurance

The average yearly pet insurance cost is $225 for dogs and $175 for cats. Although pet insurance isn’t required and is a relatively new concept, purchasing a pet insurance plan can help you save thousands on vet bills in certain situations. It could be worth considering if your pet requires frequent vet conditions, develops a medical condition or if you’re worried about affording the cost of a one-off pet visit. While pet insurance can save you money, most policies require you to pay out-of-pocket and then provide qualifying reimbursements once you’ve met your deductible. That means you’ll still need to pay upfront but could receive a discount back.

Food delivery services

Pet food can be expensive, but some food delivery services like Chewy or Petsmart offer discounts when you have food autoshipped or order in bulk — offering you peace of mind and saving you a few bucks. If you buy the same pet food brand consistently, you may also be able to sign up for rewards with that brand, receiving discounts for each dollar you spend. If your pet requires prescription food, your vet might be able to provide you with samples and coupons when you visit, which can put a dent in the overall cost.

Affordable pet medication services

Pet medication can be expensive, so it’s important to shop around for the best deal. Get a quote from your vet and reach out to other pet pharmacy providers, like 1800-Pet-Meds or Walmart Pet RX for quotes. Some vets will even price match other pharmacies, so talk to your vet staff to find out their policies.

Where Is the Money Going?

Most sources calculate the cost of dog ownership by the size of the dog. According to an article in “Money,” the lifetime costs are as follows:“Forbes” put the costs of dog ownership at quite a bit higher. Including all possible expenses, they estimate the lifetime cost of a dog to be anywhere from $17,650 a year to a staggering $93,520, depending on size, breed, and services required.