How Much Are Ferrets?

There are many small animals to choose from when looking for the right companion, whether youre living in a spacious house or small apartment. Ferrets are very popular and can be a rewarding pet, especially in the right environment. However, they can be somewhat expensive, between the initial and annual costs.

Another problem is not knowing where the ferret came from, which can lead to unknown genetic health issues in the future. While health and genetics can still be a risk because most rehomed ferrets are from pet stores, its still a better free option than meeting a random stranger online.

Adoption will almost always be cheaper, and it helps support ferret rescues that are typically run through volunteers and donations. Purchasing a ferret through a breeder is a great option since pet stores rarely vet their kits for genetic health and behavioral issues. Going to a pet store is an absolute last resort, so its important to exhaust all other options.

Pet stores usually sell them for cheaper to compete with breeders, but less expensive isnt always better. Although things add up quickly, its important to remember that pets are expensive in general. Annual expenses arent as much as startup costs since you dont need to buy a cage and other items every year.

Annual expenses will increase with the economy and other factors like multiple vet visits and medications. Routine checkups are annual and should only cost around $100-300, though it can get more expensive if a health problem is found. Ferrets need to be vaccinated annually and with a series of booster shots as kits, which prevent distemper and rabies.

Image Credit: Pixabay Annual checkups shouldnt be too expensive, though some vets charge more for exotic pets and other small animals. A checkup for a ferret may or may not include x-rays to check the spine, bloodwork, stool sample testing, and dental cleaning. Part of caring for your ferret is to help keep its teeth clean and free from buildup, which will turn into dental decay.

Even a rubber finger brush or a soft-bristle cat toothbrush will help prevent plaque and tartar buildup. Image Credit: Pixabay Parasites like heartworm not only infect dogs and cats but ferrets and other small animals as well. Ask your vet about how to properly treat and dose Ivermectin or Selamectin, which are the two main treatments for heartworm.

There are many forms of preventatives like chewable tabs, pills, and liquids, which your vet can give you during the annual exam. Ferrets are naturally curious animals that can fit into the smallest of spaces, so its no surprise that they can get seriously injured. In general, its important to financially prepare for any emergency trips to the vet hospital.

Your ferret will need to have access to food at all times due to its short digestion period, which is similar to rabbits and guinea pigs. Litter box liners, a hand vacuum, and pet-safe wipes are all examples of what to buy to keep your ferrets cage clean. You should clean and disinfect the cage at least once every two weeks while dumping out the litter pans once a day.

Consider purchasing a few tunnels and even a puzzle toy, since ferrets are very smart and will work hard for a treat. However, annual costs can add up over the years, and its crucial that you have the funds to keep your ferret healthy and happy. If youre not sure you can afford the annual costs, its best to wait until youre more financially stable to invest in a pet.

As long as youre able to afford vet visits, food, litter , and toys, you dont need to spend thousands on your ferret for it to thrive. As long as youre able to provide the primary care and diet needs, a ferret will generally be less expensive than a dog or cat. The best way to save money on ferret care is to prevent medical conditions, which are the most expensive part of owning any pet.

Ferrets can also be more expensive than other small animals, so its essential that youre financially ready to own one. Nicole is the proud mom of Baby, a Burmese cat and Rosa, a New Zealand Huntaway.

How much do ferrets cost at?

Although the cost of the purchase of a ferret and its scheduled care will vary depending on the area, you can usually plan on spending anywhere from $75 to $250, with the average being around $100, for the ferret itself, depending on the pet store or breeder.

How much are ferrets UK?

In the UK, ferrets sell from between £10 – £100. Female ferrets known a (Jills) are usually more expensive to buy than male ferrets (known as Hobs). The cost of buying a ferret can also be influenced by its colour and length of its fur.

Do I need to buy 2 ferrets?

Ferrets are highly sociable creatures. … If this is not possible, it might be best to keep more than one ferret. Ideally, ferrets should be kept either in a pair or a small group. Same sex litter mates or neutered males and females can be kept together.

Are ferrets good pets?

While ferrets are not for everyone, they can make great pets for the right owner. They are affectionate and bond with their owners, quiet for a large part of the day, and there are few pets as playful as ferrets. … If you are considering a ferret, learn more about how ferrets make good pets.

Ferrets are playful, active, curious and loving. They make wonderful pets, but before you fall in love with one at a pet store or rush off to get one after talking to a delighted ferret owner, there are a few things that you must consider.

Your ferret will, of course, need food, plus you will need to regularly buy litter, deodorizing cleaners, over-the-counter medicines including hairball remedies, and vitamin supplements, shampoos, collars and leads, etc. A domestically bred ferret will usually not be vicious or aggressive, but it is in its nature to enjoy games that simulate hunting, tug-of-war, chasing, or mock combat.

If you are not able to devote the added time and energy required for raising a kit, adopting or rescuing an older animal may be the perfect solution. A kit, while requiring more time, training, and patience than a mature ferret, will reward you with added playfulness and adaptability; and you will have the joy of watching it grow. Descenting your ferret, removing the scent sac, will not help the natural musky healthy odor and it can lead to a host of medical problems.

You may need to keep a small amount of dirty litter in the pan for a little while to help your pet understand the box’s purpose, and you can discourage the ferret from using other corners of the room or enclosure by covering them with bedding or food bowls. Prepare to be patient, to regress now and then, to clean up mistakes very carefully using an enzyme or bacterial-based odor remover, and to be vigilant until your pet gets the hang of it. Also, because ferrets love to nibble on floor fabrics, you may need to place a plastic carpet protector over any sections that your pet finds especially appetizing.

Be extra careful to safeguard the contents of drawers and cabinets to prevent your ferret from opening them, and to keep medicines, soaps, cleaners, etc. Like a cat, dog, or child, you will need to protect your ferret from suffocation hazards including plastic bags and drapery cords.

Bringing Home a New Ferret: One-Time Costs

When you’re bringing home a ferret, there are some necessary costs to keep in mind. Whether you’re getting a ferret for free, adopting from a shelter, or purchasing one from a reputable breeder, it’s essential to be prepared to pay fees or a price for your ferret.Many factors can influence the total amount, including the age of the ferret, physical/health factors, and shelter fees. With the exception of free ferrets, adoption and shopping ethically can be expensive. Let’s take a look at each avenue to see what the potential costs are:

Free

Unfortunately, ferrets tend to be an impulse purchase, which often leaves them with uncertain futures. Because of these last-minute decisions, many ferrets are given away for free on Facebook, Craigslist, and even on Instagram. While it may seem better for your wallet, there’s always a risk of getting free pets on the internet.Another problem is not knowing where the ferret came from, which can lead to unknown genetic health issues in the future. If you’re looking for a pet ferret, the safer alternatives would be to adopt or purchase one from a reputable breeder.The exception to a free ferret is asking your friends and family if anyone is rehoming a ferret. While health and genetics can still be a risk because most rehomed ferrets are from pet stores, it’s still a better “free” option than meeting a random stranger online.

Adoption

Adoption is a great way to get a ferret, especially if you are able to find a local ferret rescue. Ferret rescues will help find a ferret that matches your lifestyle and personality, whereas buying a ferret won’t give you that option.Another reason to go to a ferret rescue is that most of the ferrets are already handled by people, which is a huge benefit compared to purchasing one. Most of the adoptable ferrets will be comfortable around people or comfortable enough to be held without a problem.Lastly, adoption is less expensive than a breeder, with fees usually around $150 – 200. Adoption will almost always be cheaper, and it helps support ferret rescues that are typically run through volunteers and donations.

Breeder

Purchasing a ferret through a breeder is a great option since pet stores rarely “vet” their kits for genetic health and behavioral issues. Oftentimes pet stores will not even realize a ferret is deaf, which can cause problems for a first-time ferret owner. Buying through a breeder is supporting ethical shopping while also knowing where the ferret came from.Although there are as many ferret breeders as dogs or cats, most states have at least one reputable breeder. If you can’t find a local breeder, the better option is to adopt. Going to a pet store is an absolute last resort, so it’s important to exhaust all other options.While it’s the best option, buying a ferret through a breeder is usually the most expensive one. Depending on the type, a kit (a baby ferret) will cost around $100 – 500, and an adult will cost about $100 – 300. Pet stores usually sell them for cheaper to compete with breeders, but less expensive isn’t always better.

Health Care

Annual expenses aren’t as much as startup costs since you don’t need to buy a cage and other items every year. Annual expenses will increase with the economy and other factors like multiple vet visits and medications. The average yearly cost for one ferret is around $250 to $600, which includes monthly and annual expenses. If your ferret is healthy and doesn’t need to see the vet often, your annual expenses will be low. It’s important to remember that this is just the average, and costs can go beyond $500.

Vaccinations

Annual checkups shouldn’t be too expensive, though some vets charge more for “exotic pets” and other small animals. A checkup for a ferret may or may not include x-rays to check the spine, bloodwork, stool sample testing, and dental cleaning. If something is wrong, the cost of your visit will increase depending on how serious the medical condition is. Regardless, your ferret needs to be seen at least once a year to ensure it is healthy.

Treatments for Parasites

Part of caring for your ferret is to help keep its teeth clean and free from buildup, which will turn into dental decay. Your vet should give an annual cleaning, but it’s highly recommended to clean your ferret’s teeth twice a month at home. While this is much easier said than done, it’s essential to prevent dental problems with monthly maintenance. Even a rubber finger brush or a soft-bristle cat toothbrush will help prevent plaque and tartar buildup.

Medications for On-Going Conditions

Emergencies happen, even with the most careful of animal owners. Ferrets are naturally curious animals that can fit into the smallest of spaces, so it’s no surprise that they can get seriously injured. They’re also prone to various health issues that can exceed annual costs of care. Just a checkup at 24-7 emergency hospital can be costly, never mind x-rays and any medical treatments that have to be done. In general, it’s important to financially prepare for any emergency trips to the vet hospital.

Environment Maintenance

Your ferret will need to have access to food at all times due to its short digestion period, which is similar to rabbits and guinea pigs. Though ferrets are small, ferret kibble can still add up if you plan on having more than one. Ferret kibble will cost around $15-20 a month, with more premium diets being more expensive. Your vet can recommend food to fit your ferret’s need, though most kibble will do.

Owning a Ferret On a Budget

For those on a tighter budget, it’s still possible to own a ferret without all the bells and whistles. As long as you’re able to afford vet visits, food, litter, and toys, you don’t need to spend thousands on your ferret for it to thrive. However, if your budget is not stable enough, owning a ferret may not be a right decision. As long as you’re able to provide the primary care and diet needs, a ferret will generally be less expensive than a dog or cat.

Saving Money on Ferret Care

The best way to save money on ferret care is to prevent medical conditions, which are the most expensive part of owning any pet. If you can keep up on dental care at home, parasitic preventatives, and keeping its cage clean, your monthly and annual care budget will be lower. Just like with humans, it’s easier and cheaper to prevent health problems than to treat them. If vet bills are adding up, we recommend talking to your vet about any discounts available to lower the total amount.