How Many Cat Breeds Are There?

Your cat is one of a kind, but her traits come from very specific strands of kitty DNA. Her tufted ears, her golden eyes or her loud meow may even come from a purebred ancestor. But how many cat breeds are there, anyway? While simply asking your veterinarian will yield answers about your own cat, there‘s a lot more to know about cat breeds in general.

A select few cats, such as the Egyptian Mau , still resemble their wild ancestors from the deserts of the Middle East (or in the case of the Maine Coon , snowy North America). Since cats were never bred for specific hunting or herding tasks the way dogs were, their variations are more subtle than, say, the difference between a Rottweiler and a beagle.

How many cat breeds are there in total?

Domesticated House Cat Breeds. The Cat Fanciers Association only recognizes 42 cat breeds, whereas the International Cat Association recognizes 71. There are also some more experimental breeds that are unrecognized, so it would be safe to say that there are between 42 and 100 cat breeds in the world.

How many breeds of cats are there in 2021?

There are less than 100 breeds of cats, though the number depends on the groups you ask. TICA, The International Cat Association, recognizes 71 cat breeds while The CFA (Cat Fanciers Association) recognizes only 44.

Are there 51 cat breeds?

FIFe recognizes 51 cat breeds.. There are quite a few breeds that are unique to each organization; for example, the German Rex is one that FIFe acknowledges, while only the CFA recognizes the Ragamuffin.

What is the number 1 cat breed?

1. Exotic Shorthair Cats. For the third year in a row, the Exotic cat has been named as America’s most popular registered cat, knocking the Persian off the podium again after 31 years as the reigning No. 1 breed.

The following list of cat breeds includes only domestic cat breeds and domestic wild hybrids. The list includes established breeds recognized by various cat registries, new and experimental breeds, landraces being established as standardized breeds, distinct domestic populations not being actively developed and lapsed (extinct) breeds.

The list includes established breeds recognized by various cat registries , new and experimental breeds, landraces being established as standardized breeds, distinct domestic populations not being actively developed and lapsed (extinct) breeds. Inconsistency in breed classification and naming among registries means that an individual animal may be considered different breeds by different registries (though not necessarily eligible for registry in them all, depending on its exact ancestry).

For example, TICA’s Himalayan is considered a colorpoint variety of the Persian by the CFA, while the Javanese (or Colorpoint Longhair) is a color variation of the Balinese in both the TICA and the CFA; both breeds are merged (along with the Colorpoint Shorthair) into a single “mega-breed”, the Colourpoint, by the World Cat Federation (WCF), who have repurposed the name “Javanese” for the Oriental Longhair . Also, “Colo[u]rpoint Longhair” refers to different breeds in other registries. There are many examples of nomenclatural overlap and differences of this sort.

Furthermore, many geographical and cultural names for cat breeds are fanciful selections made by Western breeders to be exotic sounding and bear no relationship to the actual origin of the breeds; [4] the Balinese, Javanese, and Himalayan are all examples of this trend. Breed
Location of origin
Type
Body type Coat type and length Coat pattern
Image Abyssinian [5] Unspecified, but somewhere in Afro-Asia likely Ethiopia NaturalSemi-foreign
ShortAgouti Aegean GreeceNaturalModerate
Semi-longMulti-color American Bobtail [7] United States [8] MutationCobby
Semi-longAll American Curl [9] United States [8] MutationSemi-foreign
Semi-longAll American Ringtail United States [8] MutationForeign
Semi-longAll American Shorthair United States [8] NaturalCobby
ShortAll American Wirehair United States [8] MutationNormal
RexAll Aphrodite Giant CyprusNaturalLean and muscularAllAll Arabian Mau the Arabian PeninsulaNaturalModerate and muscular
ShortAll Asian Developed in United Kingdom;foundation stock from AsiaNatural
Moderate
ShortEvenly solid Asian Semi-longhair United KingdomCrossbreed between the Burmese and long-haired cats Cobby
Semi-longEvenly solid Australian Mist AustraliaCrossbreed between the Abyssinian and Burmese ModerateShortSpotted or marbled Balinese Developed in United States; [8] foundation stock from ThailandMutation of the Siamese Semi-foreignLongColorpoint Bambino United StatesCrossbreed between the Munchkin and SphynxDwarf Rex Bengal Developed in United States,but created in AsiaHybrid of the Abyssinian and Egyptian Mau leopard cat ( Prionailurus bengalensis )Large
ShortSpotted, marbled, or rosetted Birman Developed in France;foundation stock from Burma (Myanmar) [8] The original Birman was crossed with the Siamese and the Persian to create the Birman of today.Cobby
Semi-longMitted colorpoint Bombay United States and Burma (Myanmar)Crossbreed between the Black American Shorthair and Sable Burmese CobbyShortSolid black Brazilian Shorthair BrazilNaturalNormal
ShortAll British Longhair United Kingdom (England) [8] Natural
CobbySemi-longAll British Shorthair United Kingdom (England) [8] NaturalCobbyShortAll Burmese Burma (Myanmar) [8] NaturalSemi-foreign or semi-cobby
ShortSolid or Tortoiseshell Burmilla United Kingdom (England) [8] Crossbreed between the Brown Tortie Burmese and the Chinchilla Persian Semi-cobby
ShortSolid with Shaded Silver and Silver Tipped patterns California Spangled United States [8] Crossbreed between the Abyssinian , American Shorthair and British Shorthair ModerateShortSpotted tabby Chantilly-Tiffany United StatesNaturalCobbyLongSolid, classic tabby , spotted tabby and ticked tabby Chartreux France [8] NaturalMuscular CobbyShortComes in varying shades of blue Chausie United StatesHybrid of the Abyssinian jungle cat ( Felis chaus )NormalShortSolid black, black grizzled tabby and black ticked tabby Colorpoint Shorthair England, United KingdomCrossbreed between the Abyssinian , Siamese and short-haired cats Foreign
ShortColorpoint Cornish Rex Cornwall, England,
MutationForeign
RexAll Cymric , Manx Longhair or Long-haired Manx [a] the Isle of Man, United States, and Canada [b][8] Mutation of the ManxSemi-cobby
LongAll Cyprus CyprusNaturalLean and muscularAllAll Devon Rex Buckfastleigh, Devon, England, United KingdomMutationSemi-foreignRexAll Donskoy orDon Sphynx
RussiaMutation
Semi-foreign
HairlessSolid Dragon Li orChinese Li Hua
ChinaNaturalNormal
ShortTicked tabby Dwelf United StatesCrossbreed between the American Curl , Munchkin and SphinxDwarf HairlessAll Egyptian Mau Egypt [8] NaturalModerate and muscularShortSpotted tabby European Shorthair Continental Europe [8] NaturalModerateShortAll Exotic Shorthair United StatesCrossbreed between the American Shorthair and Persian CobbyShortAll Foldex [10] CanadaCrossbreed between the Exotic Shorthair and Scottish Fold CobbyShortAll German Rex Germany [8] MutationSemi-foreign
RexAll Havana Brown United Kingdom (England);foundation stock from ThailandCrossbreed between the Siamese and black short-haired cats Semi-foreign
ShortSolid brown Highlander United StatesCrossbreed between the Desert Lynx and Jungle Curl ModerateShort/longAll Himalayan orColorpoint Persian [c] United States and United Kingdom [8] Crossbreed between the Persian and Siamese CobbyLongColorpoint Japanese Bobtail Japan [d][8] MutationModerateShort/longAll Javanese orColorpoint Longhair [e] Developed in United States [8] and Canada;foundation stock from Southeast AsiaCrossbreed between the Balinese with some Colorpoint Shorthair , Oriental Longhair and Siamese OrientalLongColorpoint Kanaani GermanyHybrid of short-haired cats the African wildcat ( Felis lybica )Semi-foreign
ShortSolid black, chocolate spotted tabby or cinnamon spotted tabby Khao Manee ThailandNaturalModerate
ShortSolid white Kinkalow United StatesCrossbreed between the Munchkin and American Curl Dwarf ShortAll Korat Thailand [8] NaturalMuscular, Semi-foreign
Semi-CobbySolid blue Korean Bobtail KoreaNatural, mutationModerate
Short/longColorpointKorn Ja
ThailandNaturalSmall
ShortSolid black Kurilian Bobtail orKuril Islands Bobtail
eastern Russia and JapanNatural, mutationSemi-cobbyShort/longAll Lambkin United States [8] Crossbreed between the Munchkin and Selkirk Rex Dwarf RexAll LaPerm United States [8] MutationModerateRexAll Lykoi United StatesMutationModerate
HairlessSolid black roan Maine Coon United States [8] Natural, CrossbreedLargeSemi-long to longAll Manx the Isle of Man [8] MutationModerateShort/longAll Mekong Bobtail RussiaMutationModerate
ShortColorpoint Minskin United StatesCrossbreed between the Munchkin and SphynxDwarf HairlessAll Napoleon United StatesCrossbreed between the Persian and MunchkinDwarf Short/longAll Munchkin United States [8] Mutation Dwarf Short/longAll Nebelung United StatesNatural, MutationForeign
Semi-longSolid blue Norwegian Forest Cat Norway [8] NaturalCobby
LongAll but colorpoint Ocicat United States [8] Crossbreed between the Abyssinian , American Shorthair and Siamese Large
ShortSpotted tabby Ojos Azules United States [8] Crossbreed
Moderate
Short
All Oregon Rex (extinct)
United StatesMutationRex Oriental Bicolor Developed in United States and United Kingdom, later in Continental Europe;foundation stock ultimately from ThailandColor variety of the Oriental Shorthair
OrientalShort
Bicolor Oriental Longhair [f] Developed in United States and United Kingdom;foundation stock ultimately from Thailand [8] Crossbreed between the Oriental Shorthair and Domestic Longhair OrientalSemi-longAll; if colorpoint is considered to be a separate breed, it is called the JavaneseOriental Shorthair [f] Developed in United States and United Kingdom;foundation stock ultimately from Thailand [8] Crossbreed between the European Shorthair and Siamese OrientalShortAll Persian (modern) Developed in United States and Europe;foundation stock from Greater Iran [8] Mutation of the traditional PersianCobbyLongAll but colorpoint Persian (traditional)Greater Iran [8] Natural, but some crossbreeding with the Turkish Angora CobbyLongAll but colorpoint Peterbald RussiaCrossbreed between the Donskoy , Oriental Shorthair and Siamese ;before this, it was between the Balinese and Javanese OrientalHairless, velour, brush, or straight coatAll Pixie-bob United States [8] Mutation (falsely claimed to be a bobcat hybrid early on)Medium
ShortSpotted tabby Ragamuffin orLiebling (obsolete)
United StatesCrossbreed between the Ragdoll with limited out-crossing to the Himalayan , the Persian , and other long-haired cats CobbyLongAll Ragdoll United States [8] Behavioral mutation in a crossbreed, presumed to be between the Persian or Turkish Angora and the Birman or Burmese CobbyLongColorpoint, mitted, or bicolor RaasRaas Island , Indonesia NaturalModerateShortSolid blue, solid cinnamon, or cinnamon colorpoint Russian Blue Russia [8] NaturalModerate, Oriental
ShortSolid blue Russian White, Russian Black and Russian Tabby Developed in Australia;foundation stock from RussiaCrossbreeds between the Russian Blue and short-haired cats from Siberia, RussiaModerate
ShortSolid white, solid black and tabby Sam Sawet ThailandColor variety of the Thai ModerateShortSolid Savannah United StatesHybrid of the domestic cat serval ( Leptailurus serval ) [11] LargeShortSpotted Scottish Fold United Kingdom (Scotland) [8] Mutation of the bones and cartilage of the earsCobbyShort/longAll Selkirk Rex United States in 1988 [8] Mutation/crossbreed between the American Shorthair , Persian , Himalayan , Exotic Shorthair and British Shorthair Large and cobbyShort/long (longhair can sometimen in early generations appear to be semi-long)All Serengeti United StatesCrossbreed/hybrid between the Bengal and Oriental Shorthair OrientalShortSpotted Serrade Petit FranceNaturalSemi-cobbyShortSolid tan, solid orange and solid white Siamese (modern)(for traditional, see Thai below)Developed in United States and Europe;foundation stock from Thailand [8] Mutation of the Thai OrientalShortColorpoint Siberian orSiberian Forest Cat;Neva Masquerade (colorpoint variety)
Russia, Ukraine [8] NaturalSemi-cobbySemi-longAll Singapura Developed in United States;foundation stock from Singapore [8] Possibly a mutation of a crossbreed (excluding the munchkin cat), solving why theyre so smallSmallShortTicked tabby Snowshoe United States [8] Crossbreed between the American Shorthair and Siamese ModerateShortMitted colorpoint Sokoke KenyaNaturalModerateShortTicked tabby Somali United States, CanadaMutationCobbyLongTicked tabby Sphynx Canada, Europe [8] MutationOrientalHairlessAll Suphalak ThailandNaturalModerate
ShortSolid reddish-brown Thai orTraditional, Classic, or Old-style Siamese;Wichien Maat [g] Thailand [8] NaturalModerateShortColorpointThailandColor varieties of the Korat ModerateShortSolid lilac and colorpoint (blue point and lilac point only) Tonkinese Canada, United States [8] Crossbreed between the Burmese and Siamese Oriental
ShortColorpoint, mink, or solid Toyger United StatesCrossbreed/hybrid between the Bengal and short-haired cats ModerateShortMackerel tabby Turkish Angora Turkey [8] NaturalSemi-cobby
Semi-longAll Turkish Van Developed in United Kingdom (England);foundation stock from TurkeyNaturalSemi-cobby
Semi-longVan pattern Turkish Vankedisi TurkeyNaturalSvelte
LongSolid white Ukrainian Levkoy UkraineCrossbreed between the Donskoy and Scottish Fold Moderate
HairlessSolid gray York ChocolateNew York , United StatesNaturalModerate
LongSolid chocolate, solid lilac and solid taupe or any of these colors with white ^ The Cymric is often classed as a long-haired variety of the Manx rather than a separate breed, e.g. as the “Semi-longhair Manx Variant” in the Governing Council of the Cat Fancy (GCCF). ^ There may be some dispute to the exact origins of the Cymric.

The specific dominant autosomal gene (M) that causes the short tail of the Cymric was found in the cats living on the Isle of Man in the Irish Sea; however, the breed itself was developed by a Canadian breeder named Blair Wright and an American breeder named Leslie Falteisek in the 1960s from the Isle of Man population. ^ Some registries, such as the CFA and the TICA, classify the Himalayan as a colorpoint variety of the Persian. Others classify it as a long-haired sub-breed of the Siamese.

The WCF has combined the Himalayan, the Colorpoint Shorthair and the Javanese/Colorpoint Longhair into a single breed, the Colourpoint. ^ Due to artifacts and prints dating from as early as the 11th century found in many Eastern countries, there is some likelihood these cats may have originated in China, then were brought to Japan. However, the first known importation of Japanese Bobtails was from Japan in the 1960s.

^ “Colorpoint Longhair” has multiple meanings and “Javanese” has been used for at least one other breed; the WCF uses the “Javanese” name for the Oriental Longhair (not colorpointed). The WCF has also merged the colorpointed Javanese/Colorpoint Longhair, the Himalayan and the Colorpoint Shorthair of other registries into a single breed, the Colourpoint. In the CFA, the TICA and some other registries, the Javanese/Colorpoint Longhair has been merged back into the Balinese as a breed division.

^ a b In some registries, including the CFA, the Oriental Shorthair and Oriental Longhair are a single breed, the Oriental, with two divisions (shorthair and longhair). ^ Thai is a recently established new name for the original, rounder-faced, thicker-bodied Siamese. ^ “The International Cat Association – TICA Breed Standards” .

Archived from the original on 2015-07-22. Retrieved 2010-04-27 . ^ Cat Fanciers’ Association – CFA Breed Standards ^ Fdration InternationFline – FIFe Breed Standards ^ Somerville, Louisa (2007).

The Ultimate Guide to Cat Breeds . Edison, New Jersey: Chartwell Books. p. 44.

ISBN 9780785822646 . There is a lot of confusion surrounding the use of this name in the cat world, although it is always used to describe cats of distinctly Oriental type. It has been adopted simply because of the tradition which has grown up for using the names of countries and islands from south-eastern Asia for other Oriental breeds, such as the Siamese and Balinese.

^ “Abyssinian at a Glance” . April 13, 2020. Retrieved October 20, 2020.

“Abyssinian Profile” , Catz Inc., accessed 4 Oct 2009 ^ “The American Bobtail Breed” . April 13, 2020. Retrieved October 20, 2020.

^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au “The Royal Canin Cat Encyclopedia”, Aniwa Publishing: Paris, 2005. ^ “The American Curl Breed” . January 28, 2020.

Retrieved October 20, 2020. ^ “The Foldex” . showcatsonline.com .

Retrieved 2015-06-06 . ^ “Savannah Cat Owners #1 Guide! | Kitten Cost, Breeders, Advice” .

F3 Savannah Cat .

Heres something that many cat owners dont know: Tortoiseshell, calico, and tabby arent cat breeds these terms merely describe a cats coat pattern or fur color. In reality, there are dozens of cat breeds across the globe of all shapes, sizes, and patterns (including the Bengal, Cymric, and Manx). So how many breeds of cats are there?

These 71 breeds do not include the average household cat , typically known as the domestic shorthair (DSH). The Bengal, Russian Blue, Persian, and Maine Coon are all easily recognizable pure cat breeds.

CategoryExamplesDistinctionNon-Championship BreedsHousehold cats and kittens Can earn championship titles comparable to pure breedsAdvanced New BreedsSerengeti, Highlander (including the shorthair)Can earn a championship, but must follow strider rulesPreliminary New BreedsToybob, Tennessee Rex, AphroditeCan participate in competitions but arent eligible for titles yet Fdration Internationale Fline registers cat breeds across 41 nationals globally, including territories in Europe, Asia, and South America. Of the 48 pedigreed breeds accepted by FIFe and spanning six unique categories, some examples include: CategoryExamplesDistinctionNon-Championship BreedsHousehold cats and kittens Can earn championship titles comparable to pure breedsAdvanced New BreedsSerengeti, Highlander (including the shorthair)Can earn a championship, but must follow strider rulesPreliminary New BreedsToybob, Tennessee Rex, AphroditeCan participate in competitions but arent eligible for titles yet The Cat Fanciers Association has the most rigorous guidelines for formally recognizing a cat breed.

As of 2020, there are 45 unique pedigreed breeds welcomed into the CFA, including Bombay, Korat, and Oriental. To earn a spot as a preliminary new breed, there must be at least five breeders spanning three separate regions, ten litters, and 15 adults which can take several years on its own. To complicate matters even further, TICA (and other associations) dont accept all new breeds with open arms.

For example, the GCCF (Governing Council of the Cat Fancy) refused to induct the Munchkin Cat into its association due to dangerous health concerns specifically joint and spinal issues resulting from the breeds abnormally short legs. And the CFA is reluctant to recognize any domestic breed mixed with a wildcat due to possible behavioral concerns. Very few cats are indeed purebred, as theres little way to tell how pure the bloodline remained hundreds or even thousands of years ago.

Hybrid BreedCombined BreedsSerengetiBengal & OrientalCheetohBengal & OcicatChausie Wild Jungle Cat & AbyssinianBengal CatEgyptian Mau & Asian Leopard CatPixie BobAmerican Bobcat & Domestic CatSavannahAfrican Serval & Domestic CatOcicatAbyssinian, American Shorthair & SiameseToygerStriped Domestic Shorthair & BengalCat fancier organizations like TICA do accept hybrid breeds, but only if both bloodlines lack mutations and you can prove the genetic lineage of the breed. Bengal (as well as the longhair variation) Serengeti (but only as an advanced new breed for now) Chausie Pixie Bob Savannah Ocicat Toyger Thats why you wont see the Savannah (combined with the African Serval) or Pixie Bob (mixed with an American Bobcat) in the CFAs database.

And while the standard domestic cat may not have the easily recognizable blue eyes of the Ragdoll or hairless appearance of the Sphynx, a DSH is just as loving and adorable. Compare your cats eye color , size, tail shape, and coat pattern to these breeds and check for similarities. If youre planning to adopt a purebred kitty, research the breeds approximate lifespan, adult weight, and predominant health issues.

You may find that the breed doesnt match your lifestyle perfectly (ex: a 20+ pound Maine Coon may not be a good fit in a studio apartment) or is expensive to care for (ex: a Persian cat may require grooming sessions four times a year).

Dog owners seem to always talk about breeds. They may always describe their dog by breed (my Golden Retriever Sampson) or talk about breeders like beloved stores (the best Jack Russell breeder in South Carolina). Breed names also offer a terminology for even non-pet-owners to help describe a dogs appearance: he has a Bulldog-like face or she has legs like a Greyhound. But does that work for cat owners as well? Are there cat breed traits like dogs?

Odds are, if you dont know your cats breed, you likely have a Domestic Shorthair (or Longhair). Instead, its a term to lump together the varied colors, personalities and sizes of the almond-eyed, pointy-eared cat we are most familiar with.

Or also like dog owners, they can embrace the mutt cats that make up most of Americas population.

The History of Cat Breeds

According to National Geographic, cats first started hanging around human settlements and eating the rodents that threatened our grain stores as early as eight thousand years ago. It wasn’t until the nineteenth century, however, that cats fanciers started breeding cats deliberately for a specific appearance or demeanor. A select few cats, such as the Egyptian Mau, still resemble their wild ancestors from the deserts of the Middle East (or in the case of the Maine Coon, snowy North America). The rest are the result of human tinkering with one of nature’s most purr-fect animal companions.Unlike dogs, cats have changed very little genetically from the wildcats that first hung around our ancient farms. Since cats were never bred for specific hunting or herding tasks the way dogs were, their variations are more subtle than, say, the difference between a Rottweiler and a beagle.

How Many Breeds Are There?

Finding out how many cat breeds exist in the world depends on where you look for your information. International cat registries and other organizations all list different qualifications for the breeds they accept, and the total number varies among them—though there are far fewer recognized cat breeds than there are dog breeds. While Encyclopedia Britannica only lists fifteen cat breeds, The International Cat Association, the world’s largest genetic registry of pedigreed cats, recognizes seventy-one different kinds. Many other well-recognized registries and associations tend to fall between those two numbers.For example, The Cat Fanciers’ Association (CFA), the largest American cat registration body, recognizes forty-four different breeds as of 2018. Fédération Internationale Féline, with member organizations in forty countries, recognizes forty-eight breeds broken down into four categories.There are a few reasons why various associations qualify cat breeds differently. The simplest reason is the overall classification. Some registries won’t consider non-pedigreed cats that don’t have their parents’ names and breeds traced back a certain number of generations. Additionally, some associations include multiple types of cats in one classification, while others separate them into their own categories. For example, theSo, how many cat breeds

Are New Cat Breeds Ever Accepted?

Generally, the breed lists accepted by registries often stay the same. However, new breeds are occasionally developed and aim for recognition. The CFA introduced two new breeds to their accepted list for the 2018 season: the Lykoi and the Khao Manee.Cat breeds are also often developed from a few cats that shared a certain genetic trait. If that trait is poorly understood or connected to a genetic tendency for a certain disease, breeding can become controversial. The CFA and other organizations maintain strict rules for breeders to ensure that purebred cats are healthy and not predisposed to inherited disorders.Whether she has blue eyes, five toes or a gorgeous set of stripes, the best kind of cat is the one that wants to come home with you! There are thousands of cats in shelters that may not be purebred, but are waiting for you to give them a forever home. If you’re trying to learn more about your own cat‘s breed or are considering adopting a new kitty, take some time to learn about her unique traits before you mark her for a specific breed. Your vet will be able to provide you with the best information about your pet and what she needs to be happy and well. Also, don’t forget to check out mix-breed cats, too. There are thousands of these cats available for adoption every year in the United States, many of which carry similar genetic traits of the pedigreed cats that form their ancestry. When it comes to loving a cat, it doesn’t matter how many breeds there are because the best cat for you will have its own unique traits that you can’t help but fall for.

The International Cat Association (TICA)

The International Cat Association is the most accepting organization by far regarding how many breeds it accepts. On top of 71 unique cat breeds that include the Devon Rex, Minuet, and Pixiebob, TICA also boasts breed categories for:

Fédération Internationale Féline (FIFe)

Fédération Internationale Féline registers cat breeds across 41 nationals globally, including territories in Europe, Asia, and South America. Of the 48 pedigreed breeds accepted by FIFe and spanning six unique categories, some examples include:

What About New Breeds?

The Cat Fanciers’ Association has the most rigorous guidelines for formally recognizing a cat breed. As of 2020, there are 45 unique pedigreed breeds welcomed into the CFA, including Bombay, Korat, and Oriental. However, the organization also boasts a “miscellaneous” category for breeds nearing championship status, including:

What Is the Most Common Cat Breed?

Very few cats are indeed “purebred,” as there’s little way to tell how pure the bloodline remained hundreds or even thousands of years ago. In the cat world, we call a mixed-breed domestic cat a “moggie.” But when a mixed-breed cat comes from two purebred bloodlines, that’s a “hybrid.”Some popular hybrid cat breeds include:Cat fancier organizations like TICA do accept hybrid breeds, but only if both bloodlines lack mutations and you can prove the genetic lineage of the breed. Of the hybrid cats above, TICA recognizes the following:The CFA has far stricter guidelines regarding mixing domestic and wildcats. That’s why you won’t see the Savannah (combined with the African Serval) or Pixie Bob (mixed with an American Bobcat) in the CFA’s database.

How to Identify Your Cat’s Breed

If you adopted your cat from a shelter, you likely never received pedigree paperwork describing your cat’s ancestral lineage. That means discovering your cat’s breed can be a challenging task, especially if you’re confident your cat is at least half purebred (and not a standard DSH).The easiest (and least expensive) way to figure out your cat’s breed is by looking at images of some of the more common breeds. Compare your cat’s eye color, size, tail shape, and coat pattern to these breeds and check for similarities. For example, it’s more common for a Ragdoll, Siamese, Birman, or Himalayan cat to have ice blue eyes than a regular house cat — so look for traits that don’t span dozens of breeds!Not surprisingly, you can also invest in a product like the Basepaws Cat DNA Test Kit. All you have to do is swab the inside of your cat’s cheek, send the kit back to the manufacturer, and you’ll discover which of 21 cat breeds your kitty shares DNA with. You may learn that the oversized cat you rescued from the shelter is half Maine Coon!

Conclusion

Remember that, while some breeds appear similar in appearance or name, each one is unique. If you’re planning to adopt a purebred kitty, research the breed’s approximate lifespan, adult weight, and predominant health issues.You may find that the breed doesn’t match your lifestyle perfectly (ex: a 20+ pound Maine Coon may not be a good fit in a studio apartment) or is expensive to care for (ex: a Persian cat may require grooming sessions four times a year). Though the allure of owning a luxury cat breed is undeniable, ensure you can care for the breed first before investing.