How Long Do Tree Frogs Live?

Frogs are capable of living long lives. How long they live depends on several factors. Wild frogs deal with the environment, predators, and loss of habitat. Captive frogs are at the mercy of their keepers.

Some of them (the larger numbers) are based on reports from how long they live in captivity. For example, the average lifespan of a Red-eyed Tree Frog is roughly 5 years in the wild .

Under proper care of a knowledgable keeper, there is little to no risk of life and the pet has a seemingly unending supply of food. With this in mind, its easy to see why frogs live longer in captivity. Chris Humphrey is the proud parent of a Whites Tree Frog which he says is 40 years old (in 2017).

This means his elderly hopper is roughly 43 years old at the time of writing this (if hes still alive). Fred was rescued from a toilet block in Coffs Harbour sometime during 1977 and hes been well taken care of ever since. Speaking of, we received a comment a few weeks ago from a kind lady named Jennifer who has a 32-year-old African clawed frog.

Jennifer explained how the novelty of keeping an aquatic frog has worn off and that an aspiring owner should consider the length of life before getting one as a pet. Thats because natural aspects like predators, droughts, and loss of habitat keep them from reaching their true potential. Also, expect a frog to live longer in captivity than in the wild.

Feel free to leave a comment in the section below with questions or concerns.

How long do common tree frogs live?

Lifespan varies among species, with some living less than three years. Gray tree frogs in North America live about five years, while the Australian tree frog can live as long as 15 years in captivity. White’s tree frogs generally live about 16 years and have lived as long as 21 years in captivity.

How long do pet green tree frogs live?

Green tree frogs in captivity usually have a lifespan of 2 to 5 years.

Are tree frogs good pets?

You should! Frogs make great pets, as long as some things are kept in mind. Frogs are relatively easy and inexpensive to keep, can be long lived, make great display animals, provide many educational opportunities for children, low maintenance, and definitely have that cool/exotic factor going for them!

Can you touch a green tree frog?

Can you touch a green tree frog? American green tree frogs are timid creatures, and it’s best to avoid touching them. … Frogs have extremely porous skin because they absorb oxygen through their skin. If you have the slightest residue of soap, oil or other chemicals on your hands, a frog can absorb this and become ill.

American green tree frogs are native to the southeast U.S. from Florida to Virginia, and as their name indicates, they are a bright green color, which helps them camouflage in the wild with the surrounding foliage. They have a light white or cream-colored stripe from the side of the head down to the flanks. American green tree frogs are small; their skin is porous and not recommended for much handling, but they are one of the easier frogs to care for even for a novice. Maintaining the right environment for these hardy amphibians is not too difficult, but you will need to devote at least an hour each week to clean out the habitat.

Automated misters and foggers can provide moisture on a timer if you are not home to mist your cage regularly with a spray bottle. The safest, easiest, and most economically efficient choices are reptile carpet or a coconut fiber mat.

However, you can still use other substrates, such as cypress mulch or organic soil, moss, cork bark, or smooth gravel. If your frog seems to be eating some of its substrate with its insect meal, consider switching to a reptile carpet or a coconut fiber mat which can prevent health issues down the road. Green tree frogs are generally good eaters and exclusively eat insects .

The crickets should be gut-loaded fed a high-protein, nutritious meal before being offered to the frogand dusted with a calcium and multivitamin supplement a couple of times a week. Fruit flies, houseflies, moths, worms, and other insects can also be fed to your American green tree frog if available. As with most amphibians, bacterial and fungal infections of the skin and eyes are common ailments . Pus (which may look cheesy), swelling, or redness are signs of disease.

The vet should take a yearly fecal sample to check that your frog doesn’t have an overgrowth of usual parasites. You can usually find a breeder through an exotics veterinarian, another frog owner, or a reptile expo. Likewise, if the frog you are considering seems lethargic or is having trouble breathing, or if its abdomen seems bloated, these may be signs of illness.

This beautiful green tree frog can be seen throughout most of the American South. It is also a popular frog species to keep as pet (some have lasted up to six years in captivity). If you go out at dusk after a rain you can hear their chorus all around. They have a variety of calls to communicate with. To attract a breeding mate, the males have a loud and distinct call to attract a mate. Usually mating will take place after big rains, sometime around late spring or early summer.

Red-eyed tree frogs are an amphibian of the Animalia kingdom which is also known as Hylidae when it comes to scientific naming. Tree frogs are generally insectivores so they feed on insects like crickets, flies and ants but their tadpoles are herbivores. A tree frog is arboreal which means that they live on trees.

The majority of these creatures can be found in the northern hemisphere in places like South and Central America, The United States, Northeast India and the Andaman Islands. Due to their permeable skin, they are able to live in water too and even lay their eggs in ponds and lakes.

They generally live in the tropical regions and the rainforests in almost all continents but majorly in the Northern hemisphere. The eggs are laid by females and the male frog releases sperm simultaneously, which then results in fertilization. The reason for laying so many eggs is to make sure that a high number of offspring reach the maturity stage.

Eggs from the American green tree frog take only three days to hatch and become tadpoles. The population of tree frogs is constantly decreasing, but not at a fast enough rate to be considered concerning. Red-eyed tree frogs are famous and known for their bulging red eyes with a green, blue, and yellow mixed body and orange toes.

The adult tree frog diet generally consists of insects like crickets, flies, ants, moths, beetles, and other small invertebrates. Cuban tree frogs, along with cane toads, have the ability to reduce the quality of life of people. No, red-eyed tree frogs will not make good pets as their secretions can be very irritating to eyes and skin.

Many frogs hide in the trees to protect themselves from ground predators and camouflage in the leaves to hunt in order to survive. A snake is a deadly tree frog predator along with birds, big fishes, otters, and other animals.

How Long Do Frogs Live?

Frogs are capable of living long lives. How long they live depends on several factors. Wild frogs deal with the environment, predators, and loss of habitat. Captive frogs are at the mercy of their keepers.But you already know that. The reason you’re here is to get some real numbers and that’s precisely what I’ll give you.In the section below I listed 17 different species of frogs and how long they can potentially live. Some of them (the larger numbers) are based on reports from how long they live in captivity. The smaller ones are mostly the wild frogs that typically aren’t kept as pets.The short answer to how long frogs can live is:Page Contents

The Lifespan of 17 Different Frogs

Keep in mind, these numbers vary from source-to-source and they’re not 100% accurate.I feel like I should emphasize that these numbers aren’t set-in-stone. What you’re seeing areFor example, the average lifespan of a Red-eyed Tree Frog is roughly 5 years

Lifespan: Captive vs Wild

Whether you’reThe reason for this is simple. In the wild, frogs have predators and they’re subject to the elements. Food can be scarce at times. In captivity, life is great and food is plentiful.Under proper care of a knowledgable keeper, there is little to no risk of life and the pet has a seemingly unending supply of food. With this in mind, it’s easy to see why frogs live longer in captivity.

Year Old Tree Frog

Chris Humphrey is the proud parent of a White’s Tree Frog which he says is 40 years old (in 2017). This means his elderly hopper is roughly 43 years old at the time of writing this (if he’s still alive).“Fred” was rescued from a toilet block in Coffs Harbour sometime during 1977 and he’s been well taken care of ever since.Now, Fred may not be the oldest frog in the world but he’s exceptional by most standards. I mention this particular frog because it’s well documented.I’ve seen claims of 30 to 40-year-old frogs across the internet and I believe some of them. Speaking of, we received a comment a few weeks ago from a kind lady named Jennifer who has a 32-year-old African clawed frog.It was very insightful. Jennifer explained how the novelty of keeping an aquatic frog has worn off and that an aspiring owner should consider the length of life before getting one as a pet. I couldn’t agree more.Anyway, back to Fred. As far as I know, he is still alive. I wasn’t able to confirm this because all the articles I found were about his 40th birthday.

American Green Tree Frog Behavior and Temperament

These small frogs are timid and do not tolerate handling; they are squirmy and will resist it. Some frogs, after many years in captivity, may grow to accept it. But like most frogs, their skin is delicate and continuous hand contact can damage their skin.Do not plan on keeping this frog’s habitat in your bedroom. As nocturnal creatures, the males are especially active and vocal at night. American green tree frogs are not cuddly pets, but they are fun to watch. Their big eyes seem to look longingly at a spot, and their mouths always appear to be perpetually smiling.

Housing the American Green Tree Frog

A minimum 10-gallon tank is suitable as a terrarium for green tree frogs, although larger works well too. Frogs are arboreal, spending most of their time in trees. The height of the cage is more important than the floor space, so a tall tank is best. Get a secure mesh or wire cover to prevent escape.Climbing is essential for this species. Provide a variety of branches, live plants, or artificial vegetation. Ensure any wood collected from the outdoors is pesticide-free. You will need to treat or sanitize harvested wood to remove harmful bacteria or bugs. Driftwood and cork bark also make suitable cage furnishings.Unlike many other frog species, the American green tree frog doesn’t require any special heating considerations, unless it drops lower than 70 F in your home. It’s entirely nocturnal, and no supplemental ultraviolet light is needed. It will, however, need a humid environment.Thoroughly clean the enclosure once a week. Do not use soap as detergents can kill your frog. Make sure your hands are clean (but not recently soap-cleaned) or use latex-free gloves. Gently place the frogs in a small container.Take everything out, rinsing and scrubbing under hot water. The tank itself will need to be cleaned too (with hot water, no soap). As for the bedding, use washable liners, such as reptile carpeting or washable coconut fiber mats. You can use a gentle laundry detergent for the liner, but it must be rinsed thoroughly with cold clean water. To cut your cleaning time, have two pieces of tank liners, so when one is dirty, you will always have a clean one ready for use.

Heat

The temperature needs of this frog are similar to humans; they thrive at temperatures from 70 to 75 F. As these creatures are cold-blooded, they need to regulate their internal body temperature. They do this by moving around in their cage to cool down or get warm. Provide a thermal gradient or range of temperatures in the cage. You can do this by putting a ceramic heat emitter in one corner or end of the cage. The temperature should not exceed 82 F in that warm spot.

Light

This animal is nocturnal and will likely sleep during the day. It does not require lights, but a UVB fluorescent light tube (5.0) can be beneficial but not necessary for this species. The invisible ultraviolet rays may help your frog metabolize calcium.

Humidity

Humidity should be around 50 to 60 percent during daytime and spike to 80 to 100 percent at nighttime. Never let the humidity level fall below 50 percent at any time. A hygrometer or humidity gauge will help you check moisture levels. Automated misters and foggers can provide moisture on a timer if you are not home to mist your cage regularly with a spray bottle.

Substrate

Substrate is the bedding or lining for the bottom of your pet’s cage. The safest, easiest, and most economically efficient choices are reptile carpet or a coconut fiber mat. These are easily washable and safer since your frog cannot mistakenly ingest it.However, you can still use other substrates, such as cypress mulch or organic soil, moss, cork bark, or smooth gravel. You can try to clean small gravel every week, but it would require boiling to sanitize it adequately, so it’s best to replace it entirely every week. If your frog seems to be eating some of its substrate with its insect meal, consider switching to a reptile carpet or a coconut fiber mat which can prevent health issues down the road.

Terrarium Plants

When selecting plants for your frog’s cage, get plants that thrive in a similar climate: temperatures in the 70s F, high humidity, and lower light. Also, make sure your plant selections are not toxic to amphibians. Your best options will be sturdy ferns or philodendrons.

Food and Water

Green tree frogs are generally good eaters and exclusively eat insects. Crickets can make up the bulk of a green tree frog’s diet. The crickets should be gut-loaded—fed a high-protein, nutritious meal before being offered to the frog—and dusted with a calcium and multivitamin supplement a couple of times a week. Fruit flies, houseflies, moths, worms, and other insects can also be fed to your American green tree frog if available.Tree frogs will likely eat more in the spring and summer months than in the winter. Feed smaller frogs daily, while larger frogs can be fed daily or every other day. Expect to feed three or four insects per feeding. Do not overdo it. Frogs are opportunistic feeders and can grow obese. If it appears that your frog is getting obese, cut back on the number of feedings per week. If your frog appears overweight, it could also benefit from more space to move around and get exercise.Provide a large, shallow, sturdy water dish with dechlorinated water; it must be shallow since these frogs are not good swimmers. Mist the cage daily with dechlorinated water to maintain humidity. Frogs absorb water from the habitat’s ambient moisture through their skin. They also may drink water droplets on plants or tank walls.

Common Health Problems

As with most amphibians, bacterial and fungal infections of the skin and eyes are common ailments. Pus (which may look cheesy), swelling, or redness are signs of disease. Although less common in frogs than in other reptiles and amphibians, respiratory infections can occur in frogs that have enclosures with inadequate or too much humidity. Symptoms of a respiratory infection include wheezing, drooling, and general lethargy.If your frog is not eating well and shows no other apparent symptoms, it may have a parasitic infection. Usually, this needs to be diagnosed by an exotics veterinarian who specializes in reptiles and amphibians.The vet should take a yearly fecal sample to check that your frog doesn’t have an overgrowth of usual parasites. Also, pet frogs are susceptible to ammonia poisoning, which is a potentially fatal condition that occurs when wastes accumulate in an animal’s enclosure. Ammonia build-up can be prevented by regular, weekly cleaning.All of these ailments can be treated by a qualified vet if caught early.

Choosing Your American Green Tree Frog

Frogs can make lovely pets, but frogs in the wild are facing population declines and extinction due to human encroachment. If you take in a wild-caught frog as a pet, it may have diseases or health issues.Buy a locally captive-bred frog from a reputable breeder and make sure it tested free of disease. You can usually find a breeder through an exotics veterinarian, another frog owner, or a reptile expo. Reptile shows typically have amphibians on display and for sale, too. Most American green tree frogs cost about $10.Look for an active, alert animal that has clear eyes with skin that looks free of bumps or cuts. If you can watch it eat before deciding, that’s ideal; most frogs will not refuse food unless they’re unwell. Likewise, if the frog you are considering seems lethargic or is having trouble breathing, or if its abdomen seems bloated, these may be signs of illness.

The always amazing green tree frog

This beautiful green tree frog can be seen throughout most of the American South. It is also a popular frog species to keep as pet (some have lasted up to six years in captivity). If you go out at dusk after a rain you can hear their chorus all around. They have a variety of calls to communicate with. To attract a breeding mate, the males have a loud and distinct call to attract a mate. Usually mating will take place after big rains, sometime around late spring or early summer.We captured these images and the related video in May in Charleston, SC. The frog was found in the water drain of the house in the background of the video. You could hear other frogs in the area calling as well.

Distribution: Where do Green Tree Frog’s live?

The American Green Tree Frog is found around lakes, ponds, swamps, and wetland in the Southeastern US, from Eastern Virginia to Southeast Florida in the East and central Texas to the west. Some have also been observed in Delaware and Maryland.Green Tree Frogs are also said to have been found around Vancouver Island and some areas of British Columbia. I’ve taken photos of invasive ones in Hawaii as well.They prefer habitats with plenty of floating debris and vegetation.

General Characteristics

This small tree frog is usually bright green in color, but like many amphibians, the color can vary depending on their surroundings, mood, and temperature. This frog can, however, be easily recognized by its almost white, or pale yellow line running from just under the eye down to its groin.

Diet: What do Green Tree Frogs eat?

These frogs eat all kinds of insects and are often found around outdoor lights at night where insects congregate. In captivity, they will eat crickets, flies, moths, and worms, but they may also need some vitamin supplements.

Vocalizations

Green tree frog vocalizations can be heard most frequently on warm, humid, and overcast nights. They make a series of “quonks” or “queenk-queenk-queenks.” We found this great YouTube video that shows a male green tree frog vocalizing. Notice the inflated throat pouch – known as a vocal sac.