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There are over 4,000 species of snakes in the world. Each one has a slightly different life expectancy, ideal environmental conditions, and common ailments which affect its lifespan.

If you got a pet snake today, how many years would you grow old together? A caring owner like you wants to know what to expect from the life and health of their pets. This is why we think it’s essential to ask this question about your pet snake before adopting one: A snake’s lifespan depends on its living conditions and what species and breed it is. The following table lists some common pet snakes and compares their lifespan in captivity versus the wild. Snake SpeciesAverage Lifespan in CaptivityAverage Lifespan in the Wild Ball python20 to 30 years10 yearsBoa constrictor20 to 30 years15 to 20 yearsCorn snake25 years and more5 to 8 yearsGarter snake6 to 10 years3 to 4 yearsHognose snake12 to 18 years9 to 12 yearsKingsnake15 to 20 years10 to 15 yearsReticulated python20 years and more15 to 20 yearsRubber boa15 years5 to 10 yearsSnakes consistently live longer in captivity than they do in the wild. Predators Lack of prey, or even starvation Harsh climate conditions Hunting from humans Infections or disease Infighting Developing babies are preyed upon before they even hatch Pet snakes experience no natural predators, a regular availability of food, consistent environmental conditions and veterinary care. If you’re thinking about getting a snake, take some time to research different breeds before you make a purchase. Different snakes need different things, so you need to find a pet who will be a good match for your lifestyle and will thrive with the resources you’re able to provide. Appropriate tank size: You could do just fine with a small aquarium, but you might need a much larger enclosure, depending on the type of snake you have. Many snakes need shallow bowls because they can drown in water if it’s too deep. Food type, portion, and schedule: Not all snakes eat the same prey. Bring your snake in for annual checkups and stay on top of any health issues it may experience. But there are plenty of common issues snakes in captivity experience. Illnesses brought on by extreme temperatures or incorrect humidity levels. Undereating is especially common in huge snakes who need to eat large prey to get enough nutrition. Too small of an enclosure raises stress levels and decreases the quality of life. Newborn babies – hatchlings – live off the nutrients of their egg yolk until their first shed, which happens about a week after they’re born. When you know how long snakes live in captivity, it’s easier to keep them healthy throughout their life. Attentive and knowledgeable ownership is the key to maximizing your pet snake’s life. Snakes in captivity can enjoy long and happy lives, free of the normal stresses of life in the wild!

How long do most snakes live?

In perfect conditions, adult snakes live anywhere from 20 to 30 years, with natural predators and the encroachment of humans severely limiting the number of years most snakes live.

How long do snakes live as pets?

On average, a captive pet snake will live anywhere between 5 and up to 30 years in captivity. A snakes lifespan varies greatly depending on the species of snake in question. For the most part, if you want to own a pet snake, you should expect to care for it for the next 20 years.

How old is the oldest snake?

A 37-year-old anaconda named name has been officially declared the oldest living snake in captivity by Guinness World Records. The snake weighs more than 40 kgs and is more than 4 metres long.

Snake lifespan can vary depending on the animal’s species. For some types of snakes, living in a natural habitat versus under human care affects longevity. Specific examples include:

For some types of snakes , living in a natural habitat versus under human care affects longevity. Southern copperhead – The pests can survive in the wild for around fifteen years, but their life expectancy doubles in captivity. In the wild, predators, climate, availability of prey, and other factors affect the average snake lifespan.

Some animal lovers are drawn to terrarium animals, particularly snakes. Snakes are fascinating creatures, and there is a lot to learn and know about them, such as how snakes actually age.

But a rule of thumb (with lots of exceptions) is that the larger a snake can grow, the longer it can live. Depending on the species and life span, there is a phase of strong growth, which usually lasts one to four years. Call into your local store today to discuss your reptile’s personal needs with our Maxi Zoo Pet Experts.

The life cycle of a snake largely varies by species. Some snakes lay eggs, while others give birth to live young in broods ranging from one or two newborns to litters of nearly 100. In some rare species, snakes lay eggs without mating in a process known as parthenogenesis.

Newly hatched snakes, also called snakelets, must feed in order to survive and usually find small rodents or reptiles for sustenance. Snakes reach sexual maturity within two to four years, depending on the species and living conditions.

How Long Do Snakes Live In Captivity Versus The Wild?

There are over 4,000 species of snakes in the world. Each one has a slightly different life expectancy, ideal environmental conditions, and common ailments which affect its lifespan.The following table lists some common pet snakes and compares their lifespan in captivity versus the wild.

Table Comparing Snake Lifespans In Captivity And The Wild

Snakes consistently live longer in captivity than they do in the wild.

How Do I Help My Pet Snake Live Longer?

On average, a snake’s natural lifespan increases by 50% or 60% when the snake lives in captivity.Snakes in the wild frequently die before they reach old age.The leading causes for the premature death of snakes in the wild are:Pet snakes experience no natural predators, a regular availability of food, consistent environmental conditions and veterinary care.All of these are luxuries wild snakes don’t experience.

The Life Cycle of Snakes

With any luck, if you’re an attentive snake owner who follows the above guidelines, your snake will die of old age.But there are plenty of common issues snakes in captivity experience.Not all of these causes of death are preventable.However, many of them are just by being a conscious and caring owner.

Birth and Early Development

Newborn babies – hatchlings – live off the nutrients of their egg yolk until their first shed, which happens about a week after they’re born.After they shed, they’re able to hunt prey on their own.

Juveniles

Young snakes rapidly grow in size but have not yet reached sexual maturity.They will shed four or more times a year – even once each month is common.

Adulthood

Snakes will reach sexual maturity when they reach an age between 2 and 4 years old.At this point, they can reproduce.Their growth rate then slows, and they shed less often.

How long do snakes live?

Maturity in the Snake Life Cycle

Snake lifespan can vary depending on the animal’s species. For some types of snakes, living in a natural habitat versus under human care affects longevity. Specific examples include:There are many factors that impact how long snakes live. In the wild, predators, climate, availability of prey, and other factors affect the average snake lifespan.

How Are Snakes Born?

The life cycle of a snake largely varies by species. Some snakes lay eggs, while others give birth to live young in broods ranging from one or two newborns to litters of nearly 100. In some rare species, snakes lay eggs without mating in a process known as parthenogenesis.

Snakelets

Snakes born from eggs, like the common green snake or corn snake, emerge using special teeth used to break the leathery membranes of their shell casings. Newly hatched snakes, also called snakelets, must feed in order to survive and usually find small rodents or reptiles for sustenance.

How Long Do Snakes Live?

Snakes reach sexual maturity within two to four years, depending on the species and living conditions. In perfect conditions, adult snakes live anywhere from 20 to 30 years, with natural predators and the encroachment of humans severely limiting the number of years most snakes live.

Detection & Removal

Molting

Because newborn and juvenile snakes molt as they grow, the discovery of molted snake skins may indicate that the reptilian pests are living and breeding nearby.

Eggs

The presence of snake eggs, both hatched and unhatched, or the sight of snakes at any stage of the life cycle is also indicative of a snake problem.For safe and effective snake removal, contacting the professional wildlife control specialists at Critter Control is the best plan of action when snake infestations become apparent.Learn more about snake removal.