How Long Do Quails Live?

Always Heard Upwards Of 7. I Have An Old Maid Here— Just Turned 6 Last Month Shes Doing Just Fine, And Our Are Kept Under Lights…. Which Btw, Doesnt Cut There Life Span Any, Just Burns Them Out On Laying—- You’re Only Born With So Many Eggs…..

How long do quails live as pets?

On average, a quail only lives for about two to three years, which is significantly less than a pet cat or dog…or chicken, for that matter. But a short life doesn’t mean they’re not worth the time.

What is a quails lifespan?

Average life expectancy for a wild quail is 1.5 years although on occasion they may live for up to four years.

Are quail hard to keep alive?

Caring for quail is relatively easy and simple as these birds are very small and they can be easily kept with other small birds. Quails are also very good as pets and they are great company.

Do quails get lonely?

You must house at least two quails together. The reason for this is because they are social birds that will get lonely even if you visit or play with them every day. If breeding quail, you need at least 1 male with every 2-5 females to ensure that the eggs get fertilized.

While quail may be relatively easy to raise in captivity, research strongly indicates that these pen-raised birds are not well suited to survive long-term in the wild.

By Maurice Randall, Former Livestock Officer (Poultry) and Gerry Bolla, Livestock Officer (Poultry) – Japanese quail are hardy birds that thrive in small cages and are inexpensive to keep. They are affected by common poultry diseases but are fairly disease resistant.

Japanese quail eggs are a mottled brown colour and are often covered with a light blue, chalky material. Avoid mating closely related individuals, because inbreeding increases the incidence of abnormalities and can greatly reduce reproductive performance.

For this reason, it is desirable to record hen numbers on the eggs, incubate them in groups, and permanently mark the chicks at hatch time. Quails can be identified temporarily by a little oil paint on the back feathers (not on the skin) or fingernail polish on the toes. Successful hatches depend upon a good understanding of incubator controls; study the manufacturers recommendations carefully, and save them for further reference.

If the incubator is a combined setter and hatcher, it should be operated at a temperature of 37.5C (99.5F), but the relative humidity should be increased to 70% wet bulb 32.2C (90F) during hatching. The photo at right shows a gas brooder providing supplementary heat for quail chicks housed on deep litter. Failure to provide adequate heat during the early days of the brooding period invariably results in increased mortality.

A canning jar with a glass or plastic base, or automatic chick mini-drinkers, work well provided the drinking trough is filled with pebbles or marbles to stop the baby quail getting into the water. However, such rooms need to be well insulated, well ventilated and free from draughts, and must provide protection from cats, rodents and predatory birds. Housing should be designed to ensure comfort for the birds, to make food and water readily accessible and to permit easy and effective sanitation.

This is not enough to initiate sexual maturity; therefore, the birds do not expend energy on fighting and mating and will tend to fatten more quickly. If this is the case, good quality, fresh, commercial turkey or game bird diets are recommended, preferably fed as crumbles to minimise feed wastage. For the first 6 weeks quails should be fed a diet containing approximately 25% protein, about 12.6 megajoules (MJ) of metabolisable energy (ME) per kilogram, and 1.0% calcium.

Shell grit or ground limestone can be added to the diets after 5 weeks of age, or it may be provided separately as free choice. The latter may need to be increased to 3.5% in hot weather when the birds eat less food but still require calcium to maintain egg production. It is important to obtain fresh feed, and it should be stored in covered containers with tightly fitting lids in a clean, dry, cool area free from animals and vermin.

Raising Japanese Quail

By Maurice Randall, Former Livestock Officer (Poultry) and Gerry Bolla, Livestock Officer (Poultry) – Japanese quail are hardy birds that thrive in small cages and are inexpensive to keep. They are affected by common poultry diseases but are fairly disease resistant.Raising japanese quail – By Maurice Randall, Former Livestock Officer (Poultry) and Gerry Bolla, Livestock Officer (Poultry) – Japanese quail are hardy birds that thrive in small cages and are inexpensive to keep. They are affected by common poultry diseases but are fairly disease resistant.

Introduction

Japanese quail are hardy birds that thrive in small cages and are inexpensive to keep. They are affected by common poultry diseases but are fairly disease resistant. Japanese quail mature in about 6 weeks and are usually in full egg production by 50 days of age. With proper care, hens should lay 200 eggs in their first year of lay. Life expectancy is only 2 to 2½ years.Japanese quail eggs are a mottled brown colour and are often covered with a light blue, chalky material. Each hen appears to lay eggs with a characteristic shell pattern or colour. Some strains lay only white eggs. The average egg weighs about 10 g, about 8% of the bodyweight of the quail hen. Young chicks weigh 6–7 g when hatched and are brownish with yellow stripes. The shells are fragile, so handle with care.

Breeding

Research indicates that grouping a single male with two or three females will generally give high fertility. When quail are kept in colony pens, one male to three females is sufficient and reduces fighting among males. Pair matings in individual cages also give good fertility. Fertility decreases markedly in older birds. Avoid mating closely related individuals, because inbreeding increases the incidence of abnormalities and can greatly reduce reproductive performance. For this reason, it is desirable to record hen numbers on the eggs, incubate them in groups, and permanently mark the chicks at hatch time.

Incubation and hatching

Successful quail propagation begins in the pre-incubation period. Eggs should be collected several times a day and stored at a temperature of 15°C; a household refrigerator is not satisfactory because it is too cold. Cracked eggs hatch very poorly, if at all. Best results are obtained when eggs are held no longer than 1 week before setting.

Fan-ventilated (forced-draught) incubators

Forced-draft incubators should maintain an incubating temperature of 37.5° ± 0.3°C (99.5° ± 0.5°F) and a relative humidity of 60% wet bulb reading of 30° ± 0.5°C (86° ± 1.0°F) until the 14th day of incubation. Eggs should be turned every 2–4 hours to prevent embryos from sticking to the shell. On the 14th day, candle and remove any cracked eggs, infertiles and dead embryos. Transfer the eggs to hatching trays and stop turning. A separate hatcher should be operated at 37.2°C (99°F) and a relative humidity of 70% wet bulb 32.2°C (90°F).

Still-air incubators

If a still-air incubator is used, normal incubating temperature is 38.3°C (101°F) for the first week, 38.8°C (102°F) for the second week and not exceeding 39.5°C (103°F) until hatching is completed. Temperature should be measured at the top of the eggs. Humidity should be less than 70% wet bulb 29.4°–30.5°C (85°–87°F) until the 14th day of incubation; it should then be increased to 70% wet bulb 32.2°C (90°F) until hatch is completed in 17 or 18 days. Maintaining proper humidity in small still-air incubators can be a problem; do not open the incubator more frequently than is needed to turn the eggs, and do not leave it open for long periods of time.

Natural incubation

It is also possible to set japanese quail eggs under a broody hen. Bantams are ideal. A group of eggs should be saved and then placed under her so they will hatch together. Any chicken eggs should be removed from the nest. Japanese quail hens rarely go broody.

Brooding and care of young birds

Newly hatched quail chicks are small, and proper brooding temperatures for young quail are very important. They need supplementary heat for about 3–4 weeks after hatching. A commercial brooder or any other heat source that provides sufficient heat can be used successfully, and should be placed 30–46 cm above the floor of the pen. The photo at right shows a gas brooder providing supplementary heat for quail chicks housed on deep litter. Measure the temperature at the level of the chicks. Maintain it at about 35°C during the first week of brooding. This temperature may be decreased by about 3.5°C a week until the chicks are fully feathered at about 3–4 weeks.

Housing and equipment

Quail are frequently housed in rooms similar to garages. However, such rooms need to be well insulated, well ventilated and free from draughts, and must provide protection from cats, rodents and predatory birds.

Light requirements

Japanese quail require 14–18 hours of light per day to maintain maximum egg production and fertility. This means that supplementary lighting must be provided in the autumn, winter and spring months to maintain production.

Nutrition

A standard ration for either growing or breeding quail may not be available commercially. If this is the case, good quality, fresh, commercial turkey or game bird diets are recommended, preferably fed as crumbles to minimise feed wastage. For the first 6 weeks quails should be fed a diet containing approximately 25% protein, about 12.6 megajoules (MJ) of metabolisable energy (ME) per kilogram, and 1.0% calcium. A good quality commercial starter ration for game birds or turkeys contains about 25%–28% protein. If this is not available, a chicken starter ration (20%–22% protein) can be used, but the birds will grow more slowly.

Husbandry

Quail, like other species of poultry kept for commercial purposes, must be given proper care and attention. Environmental conditions should be adjusted according to the climatic conditions and the needs of stock of different ages. Dry food should be available at all times, and drinking water must be cool, clean and readily accessible.

Disease prevention and control

Sanitary management practices are the best guarantee against disease. Equipment, such as cages, feeders, waterers and tools should be cleaned and sanitised frequently. A commercial disinfectant is recommended. Japanese quail suffer from some of the same diseases that affect domestic chickens. However, if housing, nutrition, husbandry and hygiene are of a high standard, mortality should not be a problem.