How Long Do Neon Tetras Live?

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The neon tetra is a peaceful and docile fish and it almost never causes problems in an aquarium as they get along with most other species. The Neon likes to stick to the buddy system and does well when it is kept in schools rather than alone.

Try to add at least 6 or more to your aquarium to make your neon tetra feel more at home. Here are some quick facts about taking care of the neon tetra. These are the typical conditions but you can find some additional tips below that will be useful when it comes to making sure your Neon Tetra are happy, healthy and thriving!

Make sure that high-quality flakes or pellets are an important part of their diet. In the wild, the neon tetras love to live in relatively darker waters. Low wattage bulbs can help you get that dim light effect that they like.

Avoid adding larger carnivore fish that have tetras in their diets. When it comes to Neon Tetras, one of the main things that can impact lifespan are your water parameters. Above all, how healthy and clean your water will determine just how long your Fish will live.

For example, unkept water can become toxic with high levels of Ammonia, Nitrites, and Nitrates, all of which can be extremely harmful to your Fish. Dirty water can also lead to many other problems like stress, infections, and disease, which ultimately will impact the overall health of your Fish and shorten the lifespan of neon tetra considerably. Tank Size Water Parameters Temperature Oxygenation Maint schedule Diet Tankmates Stress Disease

As we mentioned above there are some things you can do to help maximize your fishs life and ensure its a long one. When Fish are kept in a tank that is too small for them to grow or swim they can fall victim to a whole bunch of health problems such as; As I mentioned above, the quality of your water is the number one thing that can have an impact on your Fishs lifespan.

Fish make waste which collects at the bottom of the tank and slowly converts to Ammonia , then to nitrites, and lastly nitrates. This is called the nitrogen cycle, and it is continuously happening in every tank. Stress, disease, and infections are another side effect of poor water quality that will no doubt determine how long your fish live.

Things like the Temperature how well its oxygenated (which we will discuss next) but also The PH, Hardness/Softness of the water will have an impact on your Fish. Every Fish is unique; the key here is to understand the species of Fish and ensure that the water parameters are as close as possible to their natural habitat to promote maximum living conditions. The Temperature of your tank is another critical piece that youll need to manage.

To manage the Temperature of your tank, youll need a heater and a thermometer. This doesnt mean you need to run out and purchase an air pump. You can tell if your Fish lack oxygen if they look like they are gasping or coming up to the surface for air.

Keeping your tank clean is another important step in prolonging the life of your Fish. Perform Partial Water Changes to Keep Fish Healthy Just like humans, its best to keep your Fish on a healthy diet of food that they are accustomed to.

The quantity and frequency of feeding is also an important thing to ensure a long healthy life. If you overfeed, not only will you pollute your water, but your Fish will grow overweight and lazy and potentially suffer other ill effects. If you feed to little, your Fish wont have enough energy to swim and fight off any sickness or infections and slowly die from malnutrition.

If you want to keep some friends in the tank, youll need to ensure that you mix similar temperaments of Fish. The wrong tank mates can bully, fin nip, injure or worse eat each other if youre not careful. If you keep your water clean and healthy, the right Temperature, feed them a healthy diet, and keep your tank stocked with friendly tank mates, stress shouldnt impact your Fishs health.

Decor like natural plants , cover, toys and hiding places can also help reduce stress and prevent fish boredom (yes, the struggle is real). Unfortunately, Neon Tetras can die easily, things like Neon Tetra disease as well as changes in the water parameters can greatly reduce their life span. Even though they are very common for beginners and smaller tanks the Neon Tetra isnt a very hardy fish and can experience a great deal of stress with even the slightest changes in water chemistry ultimately leading to disease and possibly death.

While its more common to see Neon Tetras live 5-7 years in an aquarium, they can live up to ten years in a well-optimized aquarium with good tank mates and a healthy diet. This ensures Im never overfeeding and the fish will be nice and hungry for their next feeding.

Are neon tetras hard to keep alive?

While Neon Tetras are one of the easier fish to care for, that doesn’t mean their care requirements should be looked over or neglected. They still have specific water parameters that need to be met in order for them to be healthy.

Do neon tetras get lonely?

No, neon tetras cannot live alone in a small fish tank. This tetra gets depressed, stressed, and eventually dies when kept alone in a small tank as neon tetra is schooling fish and needs space to swim. … The small tank with no heater, filter, or air pump is not ideal for tropical fish like neon tetras.

Do neon tetras play dead?

Neons are speedy and small, allowing them to escape from predators quickly and hide. They do not play dead in order to avoid capture. … Neon Tetras Disease can be introduced to a tank through the addition of a parasite.

The Neon Tetra, otherwise known as the Paracheirodon innesi, is considered to be the most popular freshwater aquarium fish. It is a species that will improve any setting and community tank with its vibrant colors. Ever since it was introduced in Europe in 1934, it has remained a top choice for both beginner and professional fish keepers.

In the following piece of information, you will find out more about aquarium requirements, water parameters, diseases and cures, and everything else you need to know to ensure the well-being of your Neon Tetras. If you provide the necessary water conditions and you create a community aquarium with tank mates that fit perfectly together, your Neons will be safe and happy, and will eventually live to up to 8 years and above.

Neon Tetras are peaceful and will hardly ever cause any trouble in terms of aggressive behavior towards other species. If they are in a group of at least six and the community tank is free of predatory fish, you will witness their true vibrant colors and trust me, they look amazing. This means that you need to prepare everything prior to adding the Neons as they will react poorly to any significant changes.

This species requires low nitrate levels which means that water changes need to be frequent and regular, therefore, at least once a week at minimum. If you plan on having other species as well or you are adding them to an already established community tank, consider double or triple that size. They are peaceful and the only time that they could show signs of aggression is during their mating period which is difficult in a personal aquarium.

Here is a small table featuring the compatible species on the left side and a couple of fish you need to stay away from on the right column. Since most of the species I mention are similar to Neon Tetras, I have specified the recommended numbers for each kind of fish. Ideal Tank MatesFish to Avoid Cardinal Tetras (a school of 6 at least)CichlidsGuppies (at least a group of 3-5)AngelfishCorydoras Catfish (around 4-5 at least)BettasGhost Shrimp/ Red Cherry ShrimpBarbsDwarf CichlidsSwordtail (not more than 1 male) I would love to give you some additional tips on Neon Tetra tankmates , although they are great for practically any community tank:

If the requirements for a small school of six Neons are at least 10 gallons, consider doubling that size if you add six Cardinals or Guppies. Since your Neon Tetras will spend their time mostly in the mid-level of your aquarium, it is a great idea to add species that live mostly on the ground. In addition, if the tank is large enough, the Neons will stay at their level of water and distant from the Betta.

Simply said, Neons will adapt to practically any water conditions as long as there are no more sudden changes. Although not everyone would spend time observing their fish as much, I would strongly advise that you take a closer look at your Neons during their first week or two. It darkens the aquarium but at the same time creates an amazing contrast to both plants and the colors of the fish.

If you decide to use aragonite sand, make sure you test your pH, KH, and GH at least once weekly as this substrate will most certainly raise them. This is another common sign of stress and sickness which I did not add above for the simple reason that it does not necessarily mean those.

The Neon Tetra is the crowning glory of home aquariums. Its exquisite natural beauty says it all. Its shimmering colors silver and white at the abdomen and light blue at its back, combine into a perfect mixture that blends with all the colors in the rest of the aquarium.

In the wild, the Neon Tetra inhabits slightly acidic waters that have temperatures that are generally around 25C. How long your neon tetras live depends on how well you care for them and how well you can prevent the spread of diseases that can lead to their early demise.

Neon Tetras are best kept in an aquarium environment where the encasement is at least 24 inches long and the water pH is between 6 7 . This fish is an omnivore and can eat flake foods provided they are small enough for them to swallow and ingest. Its not uncommon for Neon Tetras to swim around with half a bloodworm hanging out of their mouth, because its too big for them to swallow.

If you are interested in feeding your fish live food, then you can try fruit flies, and black worms. These are usually carried by local pet stores, and Tetras absolutely love them, so feed them sparingly. Overfeeding can cause the uneaten food to rot, spiking ammonia and throwing the chemistry of your water out of whack, leading to potential disease or the death of your fish.

However, since Tetras are generally kept within a larger community tank, the filtration requirements will need of the entire aquarium will need to be considered. Cabomba (my personal favorite) Floating plants like frogbit and dwarf lettuce All kinds of moss Vallisneria If you are adding Neon Tetras to a new aquarium, be sure to read our guide on effective nitrogen cycling.

The most common culprits are usually the dead bodies of other fish, and on some live foods such as Tubifex. Other, secondary infections such as fin rot and bloating can develop as a result of this disease, but they are not directly related. Signs of fin rot and bloating MAY be an indication of neon tetra disease, but they may not!

Females tend to be plumper, and have a more round belly, although this can sometimes be hard to judge when looking into a tank. The process can require some trial and error, but shortening the light cycle drastically, then increasing it slowly should trigger them to reproduce . Another way to trigger breeding in Neon Tetras is to perform a large water change, in order to simulate their natural habitat, which has varying degrees of rainfall throughout the year.

Everything that is inside and on top of the breeding aquarium should be sterilized and once the eggs have been laid, they must be removed. Eggs will usually hatch in around 24 hours, and from then on, its just a case of keeping them safe and feeding them the correct food.

There is nothing as appealing as a tetra fish aquarium gracing your living room. They are among the most popular fish collected by hobbyists. But why are the tetras so popular? Well, apart from the fact that they are attractive, tetra fish are quite easy to maintain.

The neon tetras boast a distinctive olive green, silver, vivid red and blue body color they are quite attractive, dont you agree? The tetras have a unique shape of teeth this is where they get their name, tetra. They respond quite well to a clean environment and proper nutrition and can live between five and ten years it all depends on how much care you give them.

Another quite interesting fact is that the fish laying tetras tend to live longer than their counterparts that do not I guess nature wants a good supply of the beautiful creatures. The commercial food sinks slowly, so the tetras have a good chance of getting it in excellent condition. But for a healthy and colorful school, feed the neon tetras with a blend of live, frozen and packed foods.

A decent variation of fine granules and flakes give the tetras the beautiful colors that we love them so much for. Typically, tetras spend most of the time at the center of the tank and will rarely swim at the bottom or top. In ideal situations, feed the fish with the food they are likely to eat within the shortest time something small in size and quantity and regularly.

When the time for spawning comes, choose another tank with peat filter, live plants, and clean-and-aged water. For any hobbyist, the tetras are easy to look after, and you only need to ensure a clean environment and practice good feeding habits, apparently. If you are in a chilly environment, install a safe water heater to ensure the fish dont freeze to death.

The primary source of diseases for the tetras includes an unhygienic environment as a result of a poorly-maintained aquarium. In simpler terms, these glamorous fish are more likely to die as a result of adverse changes in the water chemistry, stress, and temperature. Some of the symptoms to look out for include restlessness and lack of stability, a lumpy body characterized by cysts, skin discoloration and bloating.

The majority of the above symptoms belong to neon tetra disease, and theres usually nothing you can do about in terms of cure it is a protozoan infection. To get rid of the mild infections, you can always add a small amount of iodized salt but not too much of it or it may affect their health, altogether. And if there still a few of the tetras remaining in the tank, it would be a good idea to move them to a separate container quarantine.

If you notice that the tetras are restless and are sitting at the bottom, they are not admiring the stones or searching for something they lost, but instead, they may be experiencing tank shock.

How To Help Your Fish Live Longer

When it comes to Neon Tetras, one of the main things that can impact lifespan are your water parameters. Above all, how healthy and clean your water will determine just how long your Fish will live.For example, unkept water can become toxic with high levels of Ammonia, Nitrites, and Nitrates, all of which can be extremely harmful to your Fish.Dirty water can also lead to many other problems like stress, infections, and disease, which ultimately will impact the overall health of your Fish and shorten the lifespan of neon tetra considerably.Below we will go into detail on how you can help your Fish live a long and happy life, but first, here are a few other things that can also impact how long your Neon Tetras will live.Alright, let’s get into the details.

The Ideal Temperature For Your Fish

The Temperature of your tank is another critical piece that you’ll need to manage. The good news is that it’s relatively easy to do. All Fish have a specific temperature range that is best suited to them.To manage the Temperature of your tank, you’ll need a heater and a thermometer. Now there are many options out there, and we’ve showcased a few of them here and here.What you want to know is the temperature range that suits most of the Fish in your tank, set our heater to this Temperature and monitor it daily with your thermometer.That said, there are some fish out there that don’t need a heater; they are considered cold water fish.Here are a few articles about coldwater fish;

Your Fish Need Oxygen To Live

Just like all living things Fish need to breathe. So keeping your water well oxygenated is essential. This doesn’t mean you need to run out and purchase an air pump. However, it’s crucial to understand how oxygen enters the water in your aquarium.As water on the surface is disturbed, oxygen will enter the water naturally, so if the surface water is being agitated by a filter output, bubbler, or even an air pump, you are likely providing enough oxygen into your aquarium.You can tell if your Fish lack oxygen if they look like they are gasping or coming up to the surface for air.As you can imagine, an aquarium without oxygen can cause some severe health issues for your Fish and will likely cause your Fish to live a very short life.

Keeping Your Tank Clean

Keeping your tank clean is another important step in prolonging the life of your Fish.A regular maintenance schedule will not only ensure that your water parameters are in check, but it will ensure that algae and other harmful things won’t build up in your aquarium. Perform Partial Water Changes to Keep Fish Healthy

Reduce Stress

If you want to keep some friends in the tank, you’ll need to ensure that you mix similar temperaments of Fish. It would be a horrible idea to mix cichlids with guppies – you’re guppies life would be over before you finish reading this article.The wrong tank mates can bully, fin nip, injure or worse eat each other if you’re not careful.It only takes a few minutes, and you can find some great tank mates for almost any Fish out there. In fact, we can help you find some good buddies for your fish. Click here to see a bunch of tank mate suggestions for many of the most popular Fish.

Disease Prevention

Again most diseases are a result of something in your aquarium that’s not quite right.Usually, it’s the water quality and Temperature that will lead to sickness. However, when adding new Fish you should always try to quarantine your Fish to ensure they aren’t sick and bringing over some unknown issue from another tank.

Do Neon Tetras Die Easily?

The good news is that most fish diseases can be prevented, treated and easily identified.Some typical things to look for would be;

How Do You Keep Neon Tetras Alive?

The lifespan of a Neon Tetra can be greatly be increased by doing a few simple things, they are as follows;

Creating the Perfect Setting for Neon Tetras

Obviously, there is not much to say about the lifespan of a certain species of fish – it is a known estimated period that varies between the different individuals and your care. Instead, I would like to focus on how you can set up the perfect environment for Neon Tetras.If you provide the necessary water conditions and you create a community aquarium with tank mates that fit perfectly together, your Neons will be safe and happy, and will eventually live to up to 8 years and above.

Natural Behavior

Neon Tetras are peaceful and will hardly ever cause any trouble in terms of aggressive behavior towards other species. They, however, need to be kept in a school of at least six.A smaller group will not feel safe and may lead to tension or aggression between the separate individuals. In addition, they naturally often rely on their numbers in the wild. Normally, you can see them like a school of hundreds or even thousands.Their coloration depends on their comfort. If they are in a group of at least six and the community tank is free of predatory fish, you will witness their true vibrant colors and trust me, they look amazing. You can find out more about their compatibility with other freshwater species in one of the following excerpts.Overall, Neon Tetras are definitely not hard to keep. I would rank them as one of the least demanding species as long as you manage to keep the water clean. In addition, all they require is a lot of plants and enough space to wonder as a group.

Water Parameters and Aquarium Size

This is a species that adapts to a wide range of water conditions. I will specify the perfect setting below but even if your tank is off the grid, your Neons will most likely adapt and live well in it.The main danger comes with drastic changes in water after they have been successfully integrated. This means that you need to prepare everything prior to adding the Neons as they will react poorly to any significant changes.Once you have tested the parameters and they are as you desire, you can add your new fish.In the ideal setting, the water temperature would be as close to that of the Amazon River – between 21C and 27C (69F – 81F). Your pH levels should be somewhere between 6.0 and 7.5 which means more soft and acidic water. To be exact, the hardness should stay below 10dH.This species requires low nitrate levels which means that water changes need to be frequent and regular, therefore, at least once a week at minimum. Besides that, you need to replace around 20-25% on each weekly change and a little bit more once every few weeks.As for the tank size, anything under 10 gallons(38L) is too small for a school of six Neons. If you plan on having other species as well or you are adding them to an already established community tank, consider double or triple that size.This species is a mid-level fish and will spend most time moving around as a group in this section.However, they require a lot of greenery both on the ground and water level. This way, they will feel extra safe and will have a place to go when frustrated.

Tank Mates

Neon Tetras are one of the most suitable species for a community tank. They will do great with possibly any other small fish unless there are carnivores or aggressive species in the tank.They are peaceful and the only time that they could show signs of aggression is during their mating period which is difficult in a personal aquarium. While you can see aquarium stores breed hundreds of them, it is actually relatively hard to achieve at home.Here is a small table featuring the compatible species on the left side and a couple of fish you need to stay away from on the right column.Since most of the species I mention are similar to Neon Tetras, I have specified the recommended numbers for each kind of fish. This is all in order for your inhabitants to feel safe and secure.

If the requirements for a small school of six Neons are at least 10 gallons, consider doubling that size if you add six Cardinals or Guppies.However, issues rarely occur as Neons are really fast swimmers and the Betta cannot reach them. In addition, if the tank is large enough, the Neons will stay at their level of water and distant from the Betta.

Stress

Even with the perfect conditions for this species, a Neon Tetra may not feel good in its new home. What you can do is make sure you introduce them to the aquarium in the correct way.If you are unfamiliar with the release process, first you have to put the bag with the new fish in the tank and leave it there. This way the temperature in the bag will get closer to the actual temperature in the tank and the fish will also have time to look around and get familiar.Then, once every 5-10 minutes, pour a glass of aquarium water in the bag with your new Neons. This way, you can give them time to get used to the water in the tank.A sudden release will cause stress for sure. Repeat this for 30 minutes to an hour and then you can safely introduce the fish to the tank.

Changes in the Swimming Patterns

Although not everyone would spend time observing their fish as much, I would strongly advise that you take a closer look at your Neons during their first week or two. I guarantee that you will find at least some sort of a pattern in their swimming. This will help you in the future if any problems occur.As I said, Neon Tetras are schooling fish. Therefore, they will always move around in the same manner together. Once you see that a single fish or several of them have changed their swimming pattern, immediately test the water.This is a direct sign for stress and could also mean that the fish has been infected or it will die soon enough.

Inability to swim

There are two common causes that should always alert you. One of them is seeing a Neon float at the water surface level. It is uncommon for this species to be this high, moreover, alone. It would certainly mean that the fish does not have the strength to swim below.The second case is when you see a Neon close to the ground level. Similar to the one above, it means that it does not have the strength to rise towards the mid-level of the tank.Your best bet is to put the sick fish under quarantine in another tank or container. Leave it there for a day or two and examine its behavior.

How To Care For Neon Tetras

While Neon Tetras are one of the easier fish to care for, that doesn’t mean their care requirements should be looked over or neglected. They still have specific water parameters that need to be met in order for them to be healthy.Let’s break down the most common neon tetra care questions:

Neon Tetra Temperature:

In the wild, the Neon Tetra inhabits slightly acidic waters that have temperatures that are generally around 25°C. Temperature between 23°C – 26°C would be ideal.

Neon Tetra Lifespan:

In natural conditions, a Neon Tetra can live up to ten years. In an aquarium, the average lifespan is five years. How long your neon tetras live depends on how well you care for them and how well you can prevent the spread of diseases that can lead to their early demise.

Neon Tetra Water Acidity:

Neon Tetras are best kept in an aquarium environment where the encasement is at least 24 inches long and the water pH isDrastic changes in their surroundings can easily cause damage to their health and may consequently cause their death.All Neon Tetras thrive best in densely-planted aquarium tanks that have subdued lighting.

Perfect Neon Tetra Tank Conditions

Wild Neon Tetras are generally a hard breed of fish, but commercial breeding has softened them slightly, making them a little more delicate, so we need to take that into consideration when setting up a tank.

Common Neon Tetra Diseases

Neon Tetras love a busy tank with a lot of space and a lot of plants. They will appreciate the greenery and they love to swim in and out of the plants. The more plants you can add without consuming too much space, the better.Tetras will be happy with most freshwater plants, but a few of their favorites include:You should never add Neon Tetra fish to a tank that has not been properly cycled. A new tank can be life-threatening, so the more mature the tank is, the better. If you are adding Neon Tetras to a new aquarium, be sure to read our guide on effective nitrogen cycling.

What Causes Neon Tetra Disease?

The disease is caused by parasites, which attach to hosts within an aquarium. The most common culprits are usually the dead bodies of other fish, and on some live foods such as Tubifex.Once inside the intestinal tract, the disease will start to eat the muscles from the inside out, and the most common way to spot this, is the apparent discolour, and lightening of the scales. Other symptoms include:

How To Sex a Neon Tetra

Other, secondary infections such as fin rot and bloating can develop as a result of this disease, but they are not directly related. Signs of fin rot and bloating MAY be an indication of neon tetra disease,Keeping a high quality of water can be enough to prevent an outbreak of any disease, and knowing where your fish tank came from can be a good tool for prevention too. Tanks which were currently occupied by ill fish can greatly increase the risk of your fish catching this disease.

How To Breed Neon Tetras

For breeding, a female and a male member is separated in a breeding tank which should be kept dark.Lighting is gradually increased until reproduction takes place. The process can require some trial and error, butAnother way to trigger breeding in Neon Tetras is to perform a large water change, in order to simulate their natural habitat, which has varying degrees of rainfall throughout the year.You should let the nitrates slowly creep up and perform the water change. We have found that a 50% water change is usually enough to trigger the breeding process.Everything that is inside and on top of the breeding aquarium should be sterilized and once the eggs have been laid, they must be removed. Tetras have a tendency to eat all of their eggs, so it’s important to get them out as soon as possible.

The Characteristics of Neon Tetras

The Paracheirodon innesi – their scientific name – are similar in terms of characteristics to the other tetra family fishes. The neon tetras boast a distinctive olive green, silver, vivid red and blue body color – they are quite attractive, don’t you agree? But that’s not all; the tetras also feature a transparent tail and fin presentation.In fact, the neon tetras are among the most popular in their tetra family. They are a favorite among most people based on their ability to adapt to their environment quickly.Their red and blue colors do not actually extend the length of the body. The blue starts at the end of their eyes and ends at the top half of their body.The red then begins where the blue terminates and goes all the way to caudal fin – they are thus not that hard to identify.An adult neon tetra is not more than 1.5 inches – quite the dwarfs, aren’t they? So what other characteristics set these types of fishes apart? Well, there’s the blunt nose and the spindle-shaped body.

How Long Do Neon Tetras Live?

The tetras have a unique shape of teeth – this is where they get their name, ‘tetra.’ They respond quite well to a clean environment and proper nutrition and can live between five and ten years – it all depends on how much care you give them.Another factor that seems to determine their lifespan is their size. The smaller they are, the shorter their lifespan – quite strange but that’s nature. Another quite interesting fact is that the fish laying tetras tend to live longer than their counterparts that do not – I guess nature wants a good supply of the beautiful creatures.

Their Food Habits

Unlike some problematic fish, the neon tetras are not choosy and will consume anything that is available for them. However, they may sometimes fail to eat it, and it sinks to the bottom of the tank, adding to the bioload. Together with the fish excreta, the food may eventually prove significant biomass.The fish like small bits of food and are likely to choke on bigger ones – make sure it is as tiny as it can get.Their favorite, however, includes insects and small worms – remember they have teeth. You can welcome them to the new tank with spirulina flakes.After a few days, you can add live food. Some foods like Daphnia Purex and Drosophila fruit fries keep them happy – they are among their favorite.Shredded brine fish and white worm are another of their favorite. There are also tetra color bits with balanced nutrition. The commercial food sinks slowly, so the tetras have a good chance of getting it in excellent condition.The wafers, pellets, and flakes fall into the prepared foods category. Even though there are both meaty and vegetable flakes, always go with the meaty varieties to mimic their natural environment – they are meat lovers.For the freeze-dried foods like the mosquito larvae and bloodworms, first, expose them to the room temperature before feeding them to the fish.But for a healthy and colorful school, feed the neon tetras with a blend of live, frozen and packed foods. A decent variation of fine granules and flakes give the tetras the beautiful colors that we love them so much for.

Proper Feeding

Typically, tetras spend most of the time at the center of the tank and will rarely swim at the bottom or top. They are, therefore, likely to ignore any food that goes at the bottom. In ideal situations, feed the fish with the food they are likely to eat within the shortest time – something small in size and quantity – and regularly.Feeding them large quantities is a big NO as the tetras may not have the capacity to finish it within the shortest period. Apart from becoming a choking risk, the big sizes settle at the bottom, adding to the tank’s biomass. This is not ideal as it may lead to diseases.

Breeding

In the wild, tetras prefer the rainy season for breeding. However, under the controlled environment of an aquarium, they can actually thrive and multiply within a short period.Typically, female tetras are ready to breed as early as nine months. Larger species take longer – in the region of one and a half to two years.Successful breeding entails separating the male and female tetras using a partition within the same tank. This allows them to grow accustomed to having them around for future mating.So how do you differentiate between the male and female?Well, their physical appearance will tell whether what you have in the tank is a male or a female. In most cases, the male is more colorful and have a slender body. On the other hand, the females are rounder and plumper – makes sense, if you get the point. The female body adopts this shape as a result of eggs build-up within their body.

Spawning

When the time for spawning comes, choose another tank with peat filter, live plants, and clean-and-aged water. Place the female on this new tank, ideally during the night and add the male moments later.Carefully watch the behavior of the male and if they show any aggression towards the female, remove them. Next time they may learn to behave better. But you can also have several females to divert the attention from a single female.Soon after fertilizing the eggs, remove the male to prevent aggression toward the female and eggs.It only takes 24 hours for the tetra eggs to hatch. The hatched tetras are very tiny, and you should feed them with something simple to ingest without any challenges. You can give them infusoria in the first few days.You can then later feed them baby brine shrimp or some commercial fry products.

Neon Tetra Care

It is your role to ensure there is a good quality filter for a hygienic and healthy environment for the tetras – they are pretty like the majority of us that love a clean environment.We can say that the tetras are some of the most eco-friendly fish to grace your tank but why do we say so? Has it got to do with the greenhouse gases and the like? Not even close!Neon tetras have less biomass in comparison to other pet fish. This means that a simple sponge filter or a hang on back filter is sufficient to keep the tank clean and the fish happy.But how do the tetras cope with other fish – tank mates?Basically, neon tetras are some of the friendliest fish you will find anywhere. They will not show any aggression, whatsoever – they are peace lovers.For any hobbyist, the tetras are easy to look after, and you only need to ensure a clean environment and practice good feeding habits, apparently.

Neon Tetra Diseases and Management

The primary source of diseases for the tetras includes an unhygienic environment as a result of a poorly-maintained aquarium. Another risk factor consists of a higher water PH – the neons are likely to catch some disease in higher PH water. In simpler terms, these glamorous fish are more likely to die as a result of adverse changes in the water chemistry, stress, and temperature.Some of the most common neon tetra diseases include fin rot and ick.
Some of the symptoms to look out for include restlessness and lack of stability, a lumpy body characterized by cysts, skin discoloration and bloating. You may also notice irregular swimming of the fish.The majority of the above symptoms belong to neon tetra disease, and there’s usually nothing you can do about in terms of cure – it is a protozoan infection. But you should quarantine the affected to prevent spreading.To get rid of the mild infections, you can always add a small amount of iodized salt – but not too much of it or it may affect their health, altogether. Salting also helps manage the spreading of diseases.

Interventions

There are other simple interventions you can utilize to ensure the full restoration of health. For example, if a few of the tetras died soon after introduction to the tank, then the water quality is below par – not matured. But what does that mean?Well, the water does not yet have a decent level of friendly bacteria, and so harmful toxins are more than likely to populate the water. The friendly bacteria help break down waste product to a friendly level. But there are things you can do to remedy the situation like purchasing products like Stress-Zyme to help the water mature.And if there still a few of the tetras remaining in the tank, it would be a good idea to move them to a separate container – quarantine. This is especially critical if you have other fish swimming around the tank. The quarantine will help prevent disease spread to them.If you notice that the tetras are restless and are sitting at the bottom, they are not admiring the stones or searching for something they lost, but instead, they may be experiencing tank shock. It means that they have not yet been successful at adapting to the water in the new tank – they sense some difference and are already homesick.There is a simple solution to this but what is it? Holding a face to face discussion about the new adopted owners or tank? Far from it!The solution is acclimatization. The process involves allowing the tetras to float in a bag of aquarium water. You then slowly add the new water into the bag at the space of five minutes and this should go on for about an hour.You can then transfer the neons after this hour-long acclimatization process, and they will no longer have the adaptation problems – new places are sometimes just hard to take and get used to, don’t you agree?