How Long Do Morkies Live?

The Morkie is a small breed dog that is a cross between a Yorkshire Terrier and a Maltese. These dogs are intelligent and loyal, and are best suited to an individual or a couple living in a small home or apartment. Although they are playful and friendly they need a lot of attention and can become emotionally dependant on their owner. They dont require a lot of exercise but they get along with other small dogs and are adaptable to a number of different situations. A Morkie can also be known to be full-confidence, despite their tiny hand-bag size.

If you do not train them properly from a puppy, then this can cause problems as they will be overly clingy and want to be by your side all the time. Their temperament is strong, meaning they have a lot of confidence and they are fearless, so they will get along well with other pets, especially smiler sized cats and dogs.

Lifespan Morkies have an exceptionally long life expectancy, with some living past 15 years old. They will very likely inherit tear stains, dark brown or black marks, around their eyes from their Maltese parent. However, it is not certain that your dog will develop these health concerns and you can make sure you are buying from reputable breeders to reduce the risk.

Food And Diet We have talked about how small a Morkie is, but this doesnt mean they dont have a good appetite! You should always make sure to follow the recommended serving suggestions for the size of your dog on the back of the food packet. Generally, Morkies only need about twenty minutes of physical exercise a day, which can be a gentle stroll around your local park.

While they can make great family pets, it is not advised to own a Morkie in the same house where small children live. Training is very important for this dog so they do not show disruptive behavioral issues later on in life, especially separation anxiety. This can lead to separation anxiety when you have to leave the home without your Morkie, and can cause a lot of behavioral problems.

Grooming We mentioned above that a Morkie has a hypoallergenic coat, meaning that they dont shed and are perfect for those who have allergies. Their long hair will require brushing daily to prevent knots and tangles and they will need to be bathed monthly to keep their skin and coat healthy. When grooming your Morkie it is important to pay attention to the hair around their eyes, feet and legs to avoid any dirt build-up.

You should also brush their teeth a couple of times a week to help keep dental decay and gum disease at bay. They will need to be socialized properly from a young age so they dont attach to one person in the house more than another, which can result in undesirable behavior and separation anxiety. Although they dont require a lot of exercise they love to play with you, especially indoors, so they are the perfect pooch for smaller houses or apartments.

What health problems do Morkies have?

The most common issue seen with Morkies are eye, ear, and oral health problems typical of the breeds that this cross derives from. They are also predisposed to collapsed trachea and reverse sneezing. Hypoglycemia, portosystemic shunt, and patellar luxation have also been diagnosed in this hybrid breed.

Do Morkies like cuddling?

Despite their high energy, Morkies are also very loving dogs who love to wind down with a good cuddle. If you’ve got a lap, your Morkie will find it and get cozy.

Are Morkies smart dogs?

Morkies are soft and calm dogs, and also tend to be energetic, bold and smart. However, they can be needy, and suffer from separation anxiety. … Morkies are also very intelligent dogs, and are great students if you’re willing to train them.

Are Morkies attached to one person?

The Morkie is a super sweet combination, having characteristics from both parents. … In terms of their personality, the Morkie is a people loving fur ball that is extremely friendly and social. They are fiercely loyal and tend to attach to one person.

Although commonly called a Morkie, this breed can be called a Morkshire Terrier, since the Maltese was for a time also called a terrier, even though it was not wikipedia.org

In fact, the Morkie was specifically bred to be the perfect lap dog who loves playtime and adores (and reciprocates) affection. Their small size means that they are perfectly at home living the urban life in a condo (that wouldnt be suitable for larger dogs).

However, their adventurous nature also means that they are equally well suited to a country life exploring the great outdoors. Unlike some of the more stubborn breeds, the humble Morkie will happily play fetch for as long as they possibly can. Morkies are super energetic little critters, and to fuel this endless life of play they love to eat.

Be prepared to get some strange looks when youre lining up with huge bags of kibble at the pet store with your little Morkie in tow! Even experienced dog owners are often astounded by the how quickly these little loveable fuzz balls are ready to attach to their new human family. Living life with a Morkie in your household puts you in a world of endless doggy cuddles that is obviously quite addictive.

Obese Morkies are much more susceptible to this, so its important to keep them from overeating and provide them with adequate exercise (which isnt all that much). If not treated fluid can build up around the eyes and potentially lead to painful infections, and in some cases even blindness. Weve already mentioned how Morkies are energetic and love to cuddle up to their owners whenever the opportunity arises, so we wont cover that again.

To us, they are small little adorable balls of fluff and love, but to the Morkie, they are fearless lions ready to take on any challenge. Morkies are perhaps a little too good at this and one of the most common complaints their owners have is that they will bark loudly and repeatedly at the smallest sound or movement. The parents of the Morkie can often be pedigree Maltese and Yorkshire Terriers, if thats the case youll end up paying more.

Thanks to the excellent genetic makeup of the Yorkshire Terriers that created the breed, Morkies will live to be around 12-15 years old on average. Their stubborn nature means that when they are chastised theyll give you the doggy version of the middle finger and resent you for shouting at them. By keeping the shouting and chastising to a minimum and focusing on positive rewards instead youre going to make the training period much quicker, easier, and more enjoyable than you ever thought possible.

If youre the kind of owner who is realistically unlikely to stick to the strict combing regimen we mentioned above, then you need to consider trimming your Morkies hair. If youre planning on leaving your Morkie at home while you go to work for the day, be prepared to get complaints from the neighbors because these little guys will howl the house down. If you do live a life where youre going to need to leave your Morkie alone for a decent amount of time most days, then consider getting a second dog to keep them company.

The Morkie loves to play and make friends, but unless they are shown that theres nothing to be scared of early on theyre going to have a bad time around other dogs. Even the most careful Morkie owner will probably have to end up dealing with a small injury from a seemingly harmless accident at some point or another. While this is horrific enough in itself, what makes it worse is the fact that the Morkies are often put in the lethal situation due to their inherent loving nature.

Their impossibly brave attitude combined with their tiny size and cuddly fluffy coat is something that many people simply cannot resist.

Wondering how long your little Morkie will likely be around? When it comes to longevity, your Morkie has a lot going for him. First, lets start the parents: the Yorkshire Terrier and the Maltese dog.

Ancient Egyptians may have worshipped Maltese dogs, and Greek and Roman philosophers wrote about them before the birth of Christ. With their long, silky white hair and gentle manner, its no wonder they were so treasured for centuries.

Little dogs tend to live a lot longer than larger breeds. From this, I estimate a Morkies average age at 15, and that they can live as long as 17 or 18 years.

Tiny and adorable, the Morkie is an affectionate crossbreed who loves people and will get along with all of your other pets. By combining two popular breeds, the Yorkshire Terrier and the Maltese, breeders managed to create a beautiful dog with a loving personality. These petite balls of fluff are not all cuddles and smooches though. A Morkie can be as bullheaded as they come, so previous experience with small breed dogs might be beneficial. These little dogs can cause big problems if you arent careful. Morkies are also playful and will run to chase a ball for quite some time or find fun in interactive dog toys. They will surely keep older children in the home busy playing and then cuddle up in their beds at night to sleep. So its no wonder why these tiny pooches are one of the favorite family dogs! The Morkie attaches to his family quickly and tend to form strong bonds with their pawrents. While heartwarming and cute, his love for the family can create a problem when he needs to be left alone. These pups will become so attached to their families that they wont be able to handle time on their own, so training them early and often in a must.

The best a reputable breeder can offer is a certification from some of the smaller canine organizations that recognize designer dogs, which isnt exactly the same thing. In addition to getting food for small breed dogs, you should make sure that the kibble you picked out is suitable for your pets age (puppy, adult, senior) and activity level (low to moderate).

While you can choose any dog food suitable for any of the parent breeds, because of the dental issues commonly found in this crossbreed, its best to feed them high-quality dry kibble. As a breed, the Morkie benefits from being taught how to act around other pets and children, as they can be a bit bossy and nervous if not socialized on time. Additionally, as affectionate dogs that get attached to their owners, these hybrids are at risk of developing separation anxiety- timely crate training might be a good idea to avoid any issues later on.

The big difference in potential size depends on which breed your Morkie puppy takes up after- Maltese or Yorkshire Terrier. However, there is a fine line between loving affection and overly dependent behavior, so make sure to teach your Morkie to be relaxed when youre not around. The most common issue seen with Morkies are eye, ear, and oral health problems typical of the breeds that this cross derives from.

The best way to ensure that you are not getting a Morkie a puppy ridden with genetic health issues due to irresponsible breeding is to go to a reputable breeder. Since they carefully choose the lines and focus on eliminating hereditary issues in their puppies, there is less chance that youll be spending thousands in vet bills to keep your Morkie healthy. Their primary objective is to create a beautiful, healthy puppy that will pave the way for a new breed to be recognized, and not simply to earn a quick buck off of poorly bred animals, like most scam artist backyard breeders.

With plenty of attention, a balanced and healthy diet, enough exercise and mental stimulation, and regular veterinary checkups, you will make sure that your little Morkie is as happy as can be. A dog cannot properly develop in such a tiny size, and the teacup Morkies are usually a product of rushed and unethical breeding processes. With such a great life expectancy, a Morkie makes an ideal companion dog a furry four legged pet that will stay by your side for many long years.

Hell gladly chase a ball or other toys down a hallway in an apartment or romp and frolic inside of a grassy backyard. In addition to routine brushing, a monthly bath with a quality shampoo and conditioner is important for keeping the coat and skin of your Morkie lush and healthy.

Breed Origin

The Morkie was first bred in the 1990s and they originated from the United States. Since then, they have become one of the most popular crossbred dogs to date. They particularly rose to fame in 2007 when Britney Spears was known for buying Yorkies.Because of this, they reached their popularity peak in 2008 as being a designer lapdog. Originally known as a Yorktese, they have also been called a Morkshire Terrier and a Maltese Yorkie Mix. They were bred to be an affectionate, confident and low-shedding dog, but read on below to learn more about their characteristics and the Morkie temperament.

Characteristics

Morkies are normally born into litters of about three or four, but some litters have only two pups. Because of their small, designer status, a Morkie puppy can set you back anywhere between $1,500 to $3,000.With both parent breeds very small (less than 10 lbs), it is no surprise the Morkie is also a very small dog. With many cross breeds, the male dog cannot be bigger than the female, because this can cause problems with breeding. However, because both Yorkshire Terriers and Maltese are small dogs, it does not matter which parent is which gender when breeding.

Appearance

With each breed of Morkies you are not always sure what characteristics you are going to get. Morkies can range in size from 4lbs or 10lbs and they can look more like their Yorkshire Terrier parent of their Maltese parent — it varies from litter to litter. This is one of the reasons a Morkie is not recognized by the AKC, because they are not purebred and have inconsistent breeding patterns.The most common sizes and weights for a Morkie is 7 to 10” and 6 to 12 pounds for a male, and 6 to 8” and 4 to 8 pounds for a female.

Coat

Despite inconsistencies in breeding, one thing both Yorkshire Terriers and Maltese are known for are their coats. Yorkies are known for having long hair, while Maltese are known for their white fur and hypoallergenic coat. It is most likely that your Morkie will have a long and soft single-coat made from hair not fur.Their coat is hypoallergenic, making them perfect for those with allergies. They do not shed their hair (not fur), so you won’t find dog hair all over the house!

Color

Morkies can vary the color of their coat. The most common colors for Morkies are black, black and tan (from their Yorkshire Terrier parent), brown, tan and solid white (from their Maltese parent).You never know what color coat a Morkie might have, which is why they are so desirable and known as designer dogs. As your dog ages, it is very likely their coloration will become a silver gray.

Temperament

Although they are a small dog, a Morkie has a big personality and lots of character. They are usually unaware of their small and fragile size, and have a lot of energy with a friendly and loving personality. They are a very excitable and curious dog, too.The Morkie will attach to one person and form a bond very quickly. This only causes problems as they are a true lapdog — and love to be on your lap! If you do not train them properly from a puppy, then this can cause problems as they will be overly clingy and want to be by your side all the time. They will suffer from separation anxiety that can, in turn, cause behavioral issues. We will go into more detail about training your Morkie below.Because Morkies have a lot of energy, they love to play and run around, especially indoors. Their temperament is strong, meaning they have a lot of confidence and they are fearless, so they will get along well with other pets, especially smiler sized cats and dogs. It is best that they are not paired in a home with dogs much larger than them. Although they will get on fine, the larger dog may accidentally harm your fragile Morkie.It is worth mentioning that your Morkie will love to bark. This barking will be a sign of attention when they feel like you are ignoring them. If you do not train them from a young age and tell them that barking is undesirable, this can become a big behavioral issue.

Lifespan

Morkies have an exceptionally long life expectancy, with some living past 15 years old. That is over 76 years old in human years. The normally lifespan range for Morkies is 10 to 15 years.

Known Health Issues

Because the Morkie is a cross breed, it is difficult to know whether they will inherit health problems or whether breeding will get rid of some known to their parents. As we mentioned above, they have an excellent lifespan which they inherit from their Yorkshire Terrier parent. However, this life expectancy can be impacted by their diet, exercise and mental health.The biggest concern for your Morkie is their fragility. Because they are so small, it is important that you are gentle with your Morkie. This can mean that a household with young children may not be the best environment for your Morkie to grow up in.Other health problems that they can inherit mainly relate to their eyes, ears and mouth. They will very likely inherit tear stains, dark brown or black marks, around their eyes from their Maltese parent. They can also suffer with tracheal collapse, cataracts, glaucoma and reverse sneezing.Tracheal collapse is a progressive disease of your dog’s trachea which typically occurs in smaller dogs and causes respiratory issues, frequent coughing and difficulty eating. Cataracts can cause vision impairment and glaucoma can cause damage to the optic nerves of the eye. Reverse sneezing is not harmful but can be distressing for your dog as it causes gagging and forced rapid breathing.However, it is not certain that your dog will develop these health concerns and you can make sure you are buying from reputable breeders to reduce the risk.

Daily Life

Now you know about a Morkie’s characteristics and temperament, it is time to look at what taking care of them is like. This includes their diet, exercise, grooming and training.

Food And Diet

We have talked about how small a Morkie is, but this doesn’t mean they don’t have a good appetite! They could easily consume their own weight in kibble, but this certainly doesn’t mean you should allow them to.You should always make sure to follow the recommended serving suggestions for the size of your dog on the back of the food packet. Of course, the amount of dog food you feed them is going to change depending on their age and their weight. Smaller dogs typically require 40 calories per pound of body weight, with a Morkie normally weighing between 4 to 8 pounds. This means they should eat anywhere between 200 to 300 calories a day, or 300 to 500 calories a day if they are a puppy. This includes their snacks too!You should start your Morkie on four meals each day and over the first six months reduce this down to two meals a day. Their diet should always be balanced and the best for this breed is high-quality dry kibble. A dry kibble also helps your dog’s dental hygiene.

Exercise

A Morkie doesn’t require a lot of physical exercise. This means that they are not the perfect pet if you wanted a dog to go hiking or running with you. Generally, Morkies only need about twenty minutes of physical exercise a day, which can be a gentle stroll around your local park. Because they are so small, it is best to keep your Morkie on a leash when you take them for a walk to avoid injury.Morkie’s are best thought of as energetic rather than athletic. They love to play games inside with you, especially catching and throwing, but this is best done for 10 minutes at a time. You should never over-walk them because this can cause serious health issues within your pup.

Family Compatibility

Morkies are known for getting on well with other family dogs because they are very sociable and confident. However, because of their loyal nature and the way in which they will attach to one person, it is best that Morkies are kept by an individual or by a couple.While they can make great family pets, it is not advised to own a Morkie in the same house where small children live. This is because Morkies are very delicate dogs that can get hurt easily and small children may be too rough with them. Likewise, because of this reason, they also shouldn’t be kept in the same house as dogs that are much larger than them.Morkies are best suited to a small house or apartment where they have space to play with you. They do not need a lot of space outside because they do not require too much physical exercise every day.

Training

Your Morkie will be intelligent but stubborn when it comes to training. This means that negative or repetitive training is not going to go down well with them. Training is very important for this dog so they do not show disruptive behavioral issues later on in life, especially separation anxiety. However, you need to go about training the right way.Training with your Morkie should be based around positive reinforcement and play. They have high-attention requirements, so each member of your family who is going to be living with your Morkie should train them. You can use food, treats and praise as positive rewards.Although training will be easier if you have experience training a small dog like a Morkie, training them for the first time will not be difficult. It will just require your patience and attention unit your Morkie understands.

Socializing

Your Morkie will love nothing more than to be a lapdog their entire life, but this isn’t advised. This can lead to separation anxiety when you have to leave the home without your Morkie, and can cause a lot of behavioral problems. This is why early socialization for your pup is important.You should socialize your Morkie with other people and dogs, as well as introducing them to different sounds, smells, places and animals. This will help them from becoming overly attached to you. They will also socialize well with other family dogs.If you are struggling to socialize your Morkie or can’t, you can always take them to a puppy socializing class. This will also help with their barking.

Grooming

We mentioned above that a Morkie has a hypoallergenic coat, meaning that they don’t shed and are perfect for those who have allergies. Their long hair will require brushing daily to prevent knots and tangles and they will need to be bathed monthly to keep their skin and coat healthy. Always remember to use a dog shampoo instead of a human shampoo. A trip to the groomer monthly is also advised for your Morkie.When grooming your Morkie it is important to pay attention to the hair around their eyes, feet and legs to avoid any dirt build-up. You should also brush their teeth a couple of times a week to help keep dental decay and gum disease at bay.

Morkie FAQ’s

A Morkie is not known to be an aggressive dog. We mentioned above that they attach to one person and believe they are their master, and without proper training this can lead to behavioral issues brought on by separation anxiety when they are not with their “master”. Lack of training can also be the cause for barking within your Morkie, but this will be out of frustration and attention seeking.Your Morkie will be energetic and want to play, but they will not be aggressive. Train them correctly and you will have a very loving, loyal dog.A Morkie can make a great family dog when introduced to the right environment. They will need to be socialized properly from a young age so they don’t attach to one person in the house more than another, which can result in undesirable behavior and separation anxiety.Morkies get on very well with other dogs, particularly dogs of their own size who won’t be too rough with them. Because of their small size they are very fragile, so a house with very small children that may be too aggressive and playful with them is not advised as your pup may end up getting hurt. That being said, this doesn’t mean they don’t make a great family dog for families with older children.

What’s It Like Owning A Morkie?

It’ll come as no surprise to many people to learn that the Morkie is the perfect family dog. Just by looking at pictures of these adorable little fluff balls you’re able to instantly see their friendly demeanor and loving playfulness.Morkies are well suited to owners who live in all kinds of environments. Their small size means that they are perfectly at home living the urban life in a condo (that wouldn’t be suitable for larger dogs). However, their adventurous nature also means that they are equally well suited to a country life exploring the great outdoors.Morkies don’t need that much exercise compared to some larger dogs. Because they’re small they can get rid of most of their energy inside the house. But remember, wherever you are, Morkies love to play. Inside or outside, it doesn’t matter – they just wanna have fun!Unlike some of the more “stubborn” breeds, the humble Morkie will happily play fetch for as long as they possibly can. Your arm will tire from throwing the ball before the tiny legs on these adorable little munchkins tire (or their attention fades).Morkies are super energetic little critters, and to fuel this endless life of play they love to eat.No really, they LOVE to eat.Honestly, we can’t think of many other dogs that are this size that consume the amount of food a Morkie does. Be prepared to get some strange looks when you’re lining up with huge bags of kibble at the pet store with your little Morkie in tow!One of the things that surprises many people about owning a Morkie is the speed at which they attach themselves emotionally to their new family. Even experienced dog owners are often astounded by the how quickly these little loveable fuzz balls are ready to attach to their new human family.You should prepare yourself for affection that is off the charts when you first bring home a Morkie. As we mentioned earlier, they were bred to be the perfect lap dog (and the breeders succeeded). Living life with a Morkie in your household puts you in a world of endless doggy cuddles that is obviously quite addictive. If you ever go out of town you’re going to miss snuggle time with your little fuzz ball of joy more than you could ever imagine.You have been warned!

Temperament

Like many smaller dogs, Morkies are prone to several health issues that owners need to be vigilantly watching out for. All Morkies are susceptible to the conditions we are about to mention below. But smaller teacup Morkies are much more likely to contract them than their regular sized cousins.Some of the main issues are:Other issues that you should be aware of are:Despite all these potential issues Morkies can (and do) quite easily live a happy healthy life most of the time. They are not a particularly unhealthy breed in the grand scheme of things (but they are not the healthiest either).Keeping your Morkie in good shape, giving them exercise, and keeping an eye out for common issues (and treating them early) will go a long way to avoiding issues.

How Expensive Are Morkies?

Like all dogs, the amount you’ll pay for a Morkie depends on the quality of its breed. Morkies aren’t actually recognized as an official breed that can be classed as a pedigree yet, but breeders are doing their best to fix that. The parents of the Morkie can often be pedigree Maltese and Yorkshire Terriers, if that’s the case you’ll end up paying more.On average you’ll be able to pay around $800 at a minimum for a Morkie. Some Morkies with pedigree Maltese or Yorkshire Terrier parents can reach up to $1500 and above.

How Long Do Morkies Live?

Morkies have an exceptionally long lifespan compared to other dogs of a similar size. Thanks to the excellent genetic makeup of the Yorkshire Terriers that created the breed, Morkies will live to be around 12-15 years old on average.

Fact 1: Praise, Praise, And Praise Again

As we mentioned earlier, Morkies are a super stubborn breed – especially when they are young and untrained. But with a little patience (and more importantly the right technique) you’ll have a well-behaved dog in no time at all.The biggest mistake many people make when training their Morkie is that they treat the breed like they would treat any other dog. Traditionally when a dog does something you don’t want it to, a loud shout and a light tap on the nose should convey the message to them loud and clear. They’ll understand your repetitive negative conditioning, and over time, they’ll learn to not do it anymore.However, Morkies aren’t most dogs.Their stubborn nature means that when they are chastised they’ll give you the doggy version of the middle finger and resent you for shouting at them.When training a Morkie you need to focus on positive reinforcement instead of punitive shouting. Whenever they do something you want, give them lots of fuss, lots of love, and most importantly – lots of teats!This is the ONLY way to train a Morkie properly. By keeping the shouting and chastising to a minimum and focusing on positive rewards instead you’re going to make the training period much quicker, easier, and more enjoyable than you ever thought possible.

Fact 2: Get Ready To Enjoy Combing

The Morkie has one of the most enjoyable, soft, and fluffy coats of any breed. The idea of having an unstoppable ball of fluff running around in our day to day lives (before cuddling on your lap to rest) is what attracts many people to the breed in the first place.However, the coat of a Morkie requires a certain amount of care and attention to keep it in tip-top condition. You’re going to ideally need to comb their coat once every two days for best results. Most owners will probably comb their Morkie around once a week, which isn’t ideal – but it’s considered “acceptable”.The good news is that Morkies usually love to be combed. Additionally, they’re small dogs so the entire process from start to finish will only take you a few minutes. Just keep a comb handy and whenever they come and cuddle on your lap (which will be often) give them a quick brush.

Fact 3: Get Grooming

If you’re the kind of owner who is realistically unlikely to stick to the strict combing regimen we mentioned above, then you need to consider trimming your Morkie’s hair. This transforms the look of the dog into something that is less cute and cuddly (but we still love it).Even if you do comb, you’re still going to have to trim your Morkie from time to time to keep things under control. At a minimum, you should be trimming the hair around the anal cavity and the eyes once every 30 days. This will help avoid infection (at both ends) and keep your doggy happy and healthy.

Fact 4: Morkies Are Social

Morkies absolutely love being around other humans and animals. They are one of the most friendly and social breeds on the planet (which is another thing that attracts so many people to them). However, their social nature also means that they are renowned for suffering from separation anxiety.If you’re planning on leaving your Morkie at home while you go to work for the day, be prepared to get complaints from the neighbors – because these little guys will howl the house down. Separation anxiety can often be trained out of a Morkie, but it’s hard work.If you do live a life where you’re going to need to leave your Morkie alone for a decent amount of time most days, then consider getting a second dog to keep them company. This can often reduce separation anxiety (providing the other dog doesn’t make the problem worse).Just remember to get a dog of a similar size, because as we mentioned earlier – Morkies are fearless yet fragile. Injuries will almost certainly occur if you leave a Morkie and a big dog alone to play together on a regular basis.

Fact 5: Morkies Can Be Anti-Social

The very nature of the Morkie is to be social, it’s part of the breed. However, Morkies have a curious trait. If they are not exposed to social interaction with other dogs when they are young, they become super anti-social.Morkies who don’t get to play and engage with other dogs while they are puppies will feel anxiety and fear when they reach maturity and interact with other dogs. This can either result in cowering, or aggression.It’s super important to ensure a Morkie has as much interaction and fun with other dogs as possible from a very young age. The Morkie loves to play and make friends, but unless they are shown that there’s nothing to be scared of early on – they’re going to have a bad time around other dogs.

Fact 6: Morkies Are Fragile

We’ve already mentioned that Morkies are super fragile little dogs. They can easily be broken, scratched, bumped, and hurt in a variety of different ways. Even the most careful Morkie owner will probably have to end up dealing with a small injury from a seemingly harmless accident at some point or another.However, small issues are not the worst that can happen. Each and every year many Morkies are accidentally killed by their owners. While this is horrific enough in itself, what makes it worse is the fact that the Morkies are often put in the lethal situation due to their inherent loving nature.Any Morkie owner will be able to tell you that given the chance your Morkie will jump in bed with you to sleep. They just can’t stay away! And while this is adorably cute, it’s also quite dangerous.Rolling on top of a Morkie during the night is a serious issue that can (and does) claim the life of a dog with alarming ease. Be super careful if you are planning on letting your Morkie share the bed with you. This happens much more often than you may think.

Yorkshire Terriers live a long while

Typically, Yorkies live 14 to 16 years. Don’t let the sweet, gentle look of these feisty terriers fool you. While this popular breed is often pampered today, people used their ancestors to hunt rats just 150 years ago in northern England and Scotland.They’re sturdy little terriers with plenty of energy and strength for their size.

Maltese Dogs

This elegant breed, which has a life span of 12 to 14 years, has been around for 28 centuries. Ancient Egyptians may have worshipped Maltese dogs, and Greek and Roman philosophers wrote about them before the birth of Christ.With their long, silky white hair and gentle manner, it’s no wonder they were so treasured for centuries.

Origin

Before the 1980s, what are now designer dogs were simply considered to be adorable mutts. However, after the Labradoodle became a worldwide phenomenon, more and more breeders turned to crossbreeding to create new and improved dogs. Their goal was to minimize the potential for hereditary canine diseases and develop breeds with unique yet desirable traits. Naturally, the sudden influx of countless mixed breed dogs that were now touted as designer breeds made it hard for anyone to pinpoint the origin of a specific hybrid. It was anarchy for a while there. At best, we can only estimate when and where a designer dog breed was first made. The same goes for the cute Morkie! These pups popped up so suddenly and in such an abundance that it’s almost impossible to determine where it all began.Originating in the United States, the Morkie was bred to be a well-loved lapdog. The main objective for breeders was to create a small-sized dog, with low-shedding coat, and adorable teddy bear looks. One look is all it takes to see that the undertaking was more than successful, as the cuteness of these pooches will melt you in a puddle in no time. These dogs are designed to be loved and failing to fall for them requires significant effort and a stone cold heart.Although it is unclear when first Morkie was created, this hybrid breed has been gaining popularity for the last 20 years. Despite the fact that these fluffy dogs have been around for quite some time, they are still not officially recognized as a breed. Of course, this doesn’t stop people from wanting this feisty teddy bear look alike as their perfectly lap-sized pet! Official breed recognition is overrated. Cuteness trumps all.While “Morkie” is definitely the most used name for this designer dog breed, you may also come across names like Yorktese or Morkshire Terrier. Even names such as Maltiyork, Malkie, Malki, Yorkiemalt or Yortese have been mentioned a few times. They’re not as catchy, but some people seem to prefer them. So if you are ever confused by those alternative names, rest assured that all of them are Morkies.

Pedigree

The Morkie was developed by breeding a Maltese to a Yorkshire Terrier. This breeding resulted in a crossbreed that we call the Morkie. While both of the parent breeds are recognized with kennel clubs across the world, their hybrid offspring has yet to become an official breed. The main reason for the wariness around designer dogs breeds such as Morkie is that the breeding results simply are not reliable. With each cross, you don’t know what you’re going to get. A puppy might take after one breed more than the other, or inherit health issues from both breeds. It’s not an exact science just yet. It will take a few generations of Morkies before these things can become predictable.
This is why ethical breeding is so important with this style of designer dog. By getting your Morkie from a reputable breeder, you know that you’re getting a healthy pup that meets the highest crossbreed standards. Furthermore, true Morkie enthusiasts have hopes of developing their own purebred dogs that will be recognized by prestigious registries such as the American Kennel Club and Canadian Kennel Club. Of course, this process takes time and work. So don’t expect anything even resembling an official pedigree when you buy a Morkie puppy! The best a reputable breeder can offer is a certification from some of the smaller canine organizations that recognize designer dogs, which isn’t exactly the same thing.However, paper or not, you can be sure that your new pet comes from impressive ancestors. Both the Maltese and the Yorkie are popular breeds with long and happy histories as family pets. In fact, some claim that the Maltese is the oldest European toy breed to still exist today! With parents such as these, Morkie has a bright future ahead. If bred ethically, this mix will inherit the best from both worlds and have a lovely character and sweet temperament- all bundled in one really cute package! We’re excited to see how this breed develops because they are sure to be popular. It’s practically impossible not to fall in love with a Morkie.

Training

Morkies might be little, but they have huge appetites. These little guys can eat their weight in kibble! Of course, that doesn’t mean you should let them: following serving recommendation by pet food manufacturer or your veterinarian is the safest course to follow. These pups will munch their way through almost anything that you put in front of them, so make sure that you are monitoring their meals on their behalf.Most pawrents decide on feeding their Morkie store-bought pet food appropriate for small breed dogs, as these foods contain all the necessary nutrients and meet the dietary requirements of their new pet. In addition to getting food for small breed dogs, you should make sure that the kibble you picked out is suitable for your pet’s age (puppy, adult, senior) and activity level (low to moderate). As always, a little research goes a long way to ensure that your pup gets the diet they need and deserve.While you can choose any dog food suitable for any of the parent breeds, because of the dental issues commonly found in this crossbreed, it’s best to feed them high-quality dry kibble. The dry food will prevent cavities, plaque buildup, gum infections, tooth loss and bad breath. So take this recommendation seriously. Saving a few dollars on kibble now could cost you quite a bit in vet bills in the future if you aren’t careful.

Weight

The Morkie usually weighs between 4 and 8 pounds and is generally 6 to 8 inches tall at the withers. The big difference in potential size depends on which breed your Morkie puppy takes up after- Maltese or Yorkshire Terrier. Either way, this is a very small dog. Only their personality is large and trust us, that’ll do! Their looks and size generally depend on the litter, and their actual looks cannot be predicted – that’s just the way it is with designer dog breeds. Still, a Morkie can be generally considered to be a small sized dog breed. This can mean that they have a characteristic small breed temperament, and the according energy levels. Still, due to their size, and the traits of the parent breeds, a Morkie can become obese if its diet is neglected. Fail to provide enough exercise, and feed your pet junk on top of that, and you might end up with a chubby little Morkie! Remember that obesity is a gateway to a lot of other problems, so don’t allow this to happen.

Temperament/Behavior

Morkies are happy-go-lucky dogs and are playful, despite their tiny size. Those miniature bodies hold a lot of spirit and character! They love to play and will run around the house fetching toys and balls or hightail it around the backyard with the kids. Because the Morkie is so small, he does best with adults and older children. Little kids, as much as they’re well-behaved, tend to play carelessly and can inadvertently hurt a fragile Morkie during play. As for other household pets, Morkies will also get along well with other small dogs and cats. Larger dogs should be avoided as they could injure Morkie simply by playing rough. We all know how big dogs tend to be completely unaware of their size! That’s bad news for your sweet and fragile little Morkie.
Underneath all of that playfulness and, sometimes, feistiness, Morkies are true lap dogs. These cuddle bugs have a sweet and loving nature. They tend to form strong bonds with their owners, wanting nothing more than to be by their side at all times. However, there is a fine line between loving affection and overly dependent behavior, so make sure to teach your Morkie to be relaxed when you’re not around. Indulging these pups in in their clingy needs can lead to serious behavioral issues later on, including separation anxiety. So be careful!While their size makes them ideal pets for apartment dwellers, Morkies can be a problem for your neighbours because they love to bark. When left alone, this little yapper will bark until someone comes home to be with him, which doesn’t exactly curry favor with neighbors. This separation anxiety can pose a problem so having an owner who can bring the Morkie with them when they leave is quite beneficial. Better yet, a person who is at home much of the time would be best. Or at least, Morkies deserve a family where, at any given time, one of the caretakers is at home.

Common Health Problems

The most common issue seen with Morkies are eye, ear, and oral health problems typical of the breeds that this cross derives from. They are also predisposed to collapsed trachea and reverse sneezing. Hypoglycemia, portosystemic shunt, and patellar luxation have also been diagnosed in this hybrid breed.However, these are not issues that are certain to happen with any pooch. Some Morkies can be affected by these hereditary issues, whereas others can be perfectly healthy. The best way to ensure that you are not getting a Morkie a puppy ridden with genetic health issues due to irresponsible breeding is to go to a reputable breeder. Since they carefully choose the lines and focus on eliminating hereditary issues in their puppies, there is less chance that you’ll be spending thousands in vet bills to keep your Morkie healthy. Their primary objective is to create a beautiful, healthy puppy that will pave the way for a new breed to be recognized, and not simply to earn a quick buck off of poorly bred animals, like most scam artist backyard breeders.Of course, one of the best ways to ensure that your Morkie will live a healthy and problem-free life is to take good care of them! Simple! With plenty of attention, a balanced and healthy diet, enough exercise and mental stimulation, and regular veterinary checkups, you will make sure that your little Morkie is as happy as can be. Of course, nature cannot be changed, and sometimes one of these common health problems might spring up. Still, the chances are in your pet’s favor.Additionally, you should steer clear from so-called teacup Morkies. Although they are undoubtedly cuter than a button, they usually have countless health issues. After all, the whole idea and their “teacup” looks simply are not natural! A dog cannot properly develop in such a tiny size, and the teacup Morkies are usually a product of rushed and unethical breeding processes.

Life Expectancy

The average lifespan of a Morkie is between 10 and 16 years. And that’s quite a remarkable life expectancy! Especially if we consider the fact that most dog breeds can reach 15 years of age at best. This means that a Morkie is above average when it comes to age, as 16 years is not at all little. With such a great life expectancy, a Morkie makes an ideal companion dog – a furry four legged pet that will stay by your side for many long years. It is a perfect chance to find a friend to share in on your adventures for a good portion of your adult life. Of course, combined with the great and quirky temperament of a Morkie, this companionship becomes almost perfect!

Exercise Requirements

Even though they are small dogs, the Morkie is quite energetic. He doesn’t require too much exercise. A brisk walk in the morning and an evening stroll will provide the Morkie with all of the exercise he needs to stay healthy and fit. Of course, he will also need to have playtime. He’ll gladly chase a ball or other toys down a hallway in an apartment or romp and frolic inside of a grassy backyard. Morkies should never be left off leash to play unless he is in a securely fenced area. Even then, you should monitor your dog at all times. There have been many cases where a flying predator such as an owl or an eagle snatched a small breed dog from their own yard and carried them away. If you live in an area where these birds are known to roam, pay particular attention not to leave your pooch unattended!While they’re not a high maintenance breed, without enough exercise Morkies will become bored and destructive. They will bark incessantly and destroy your property. Many people don’t realize just how destructive these little guys can be! They can easily rip couch cushions to shreds, dig at the base of doors until his paws are bloody and the door is damaged or urinate and defecate all over the house. No dog owner wants to come home to that. Sometimes, this destructive behavior stems from their separation anxiety. Morkies do best when they have a stay-at-home parent to hang out with and have fun. However, sometimes the reason for this destructive behaviour is mere boredom. Morkies are intelligent dogs that need an outlet for all that smarts. If they are not challenged, they can get bored and destructive fairly quickly. Don’t neglect this hybrid’s need for mental exercise! Make sure to leave them with puzzle toys when you’re not around or provide another source of fun for them. Like…say…a furry companion!

Recognized Clubs

The American Kennel Club does not recognize the Morkie as a bona fide breed of dog. As a first generation mix, this hybrid is a tad to unpredictable for the AKC. However, there are canine clubs that do recognize designer dogs as breeds in their own right. Morkies are recognized by the American Canine Hybrid Club, Designer Dogs Kennel Club, Dog Registry of America, American Morkshire Terrier Club, Morkshire Hybrid Registry, and International Designer Canine Registry.In addition to the name Morkie, this hybrid is recognized as Malki by the Designer Breed Registry.

Coat

There is no defined coat style or color defined for the Morkie because it is a crossbred dog. For the most part, the coats are soft and rather long. The colors typically range from solid white to black and tan and every color and combination in between. Although this might bother some people, because they can’t know what to expect with each litter, designer dog breed fans find this charming. The unpredictable diversity is what makes these pooches so special!Both the Maltese and the Yorkie are considered to have hypoallergenic coats, but this is no guarantee that their offspring won’t trigger your allergies. If you’re thinking of getting a Morkie because you count on them being hypoallergenic, it’s best to spend some time with one first. That way you can make sure that their hair won’t give you the sniffles.Regardless of your Morkie’s coat style, they will need regular grooming. This crossbreed needs to be brushed several times a week to keep the coat from matting or tangling. Both of the parental breeds have a low-shedding and silky fur that needs a lot of care. This hybrid is no different. In addition to routine brushing, a monthly bath with a quality shampoo and conditioner is important for keeping the coat and skin of your Morkie lush and healthy.