How Long Do Lionhead Rabbits Live?

Known for its distinctive look, unique mane and lion-like appearance the lionhead bunny is gaining popularity quickly among rabbit enthusiasts. Although lionhead rabbits require more attention than traditional rabbit breeds, with the proper care these rabbits can live, on average, anywhere between seven and 10 years. Understanding the basics of rabbit care and the special needs of the lionhead bunny will help ensure a rabbits long and healthy life.

While commercial rabbit feed containing extra seeds and colorful treats may look appetizing, those products often contain too much protein and nonnutritive fillers, and should be avoided.

How long do lionhead rabbits live at home?

Although lionhead rabbits require more attention than traditional rabbit breeds, with the proper care these rabbits can live, on average, anywhere between seven and 10 years. Understanding the basics of rabbit care and the special needs of the lionhead bunny will help ensure a rabbit’s long and healthy life.

Do lionhead rabbits like to be held?

Lionheads are extremely good natured, and combined with the genetic mutation that gives them the long fur around their heads are not only a pleasant pet to spend time with, but pleasant to look at as well. They are happy to cuddle up and enjoy as much attention as they can get.

Do lionhead rabbits get lonely?

Can Lionhead Rabbits Live Alone ? No, it would be cruel to keep a single rabbit as a pet because rabbits are sociable animals. If forced to live alone, they may become stressed and anxious. Lionheads can become frightened quite easily, so they will benefit from having a mate.

Do lionhead rabbits have health problems?

Obese rabbits display low energy levels and can suffer from respiratory problems and arthritis ; dwarf rabbits like lionheads are particularly prone to obesity — smaller rabbits require less food and are easily overfed, while their tiny frame makes obesity less obvious than in larger rabbit breeds.

The Lionhead Rabbit is a relatively new rabbit breed within the United States of America. Although the breed had been imported around 1998, it was not until 2014 that the American Rabbit Breeders Association (ARBA) approved the Lionhead Rabbit as an officially recognized breed. In contrast, the United Kingdoms British Rabbit Council (BRC) already recognized all known colours and varieties of the breed, in 2002.

However, in doing the specific breed-crossing (quite possibly being that of a Swiss Fox and Netherland Dwarf) that was used, there was a gene mutation that occurred, causing this new breed to consistently produce a line of wool around the head region, and often times the flanks as well. The purchase of the Lionhead itself will vary from a ballpark figure of $20.00 to $125.00 , depending upon the quality of rabbit you choose to have, where you buy it from, and whether or not it is pedigreed.

However, if you are considering breeding them, and / or showing them, a pedigree will be needed and it would be necessary to buy the best quality of rabbit that you can afford and that is available to purchase. On the average scale, however, by the time you add in the cost of the rabbit, the hutch or cage, feed, hay, treats, basic grooming and medical supplies, you can expect to pay in the wide-range of $300.00 $750.00 for one year.

It was named as lionhead since it had the mane of wool around its head which is like that of a lion. As rabbitmatters.com notes, the slightly rounded and broadhead is set close to the body with short thick upright ears, 2-3 (5cm-7.5cm) in length, and a well-developed muzzle.

However, those that are kept indoors are protected especially from adverse environmental conditions as well as the predators hence increasing their lifespan. Moreover, there are high chances of escape by outdoor lionhead bunnies or being stressed in case of attacks by a predator or sees it.

Note that domestic bunnies that have escaped do not have adaptive features that can increase their chances of survival in the wild. Most of them do not have colors that blend their background to prevent predators from noticing them, hence they are probable targets. Animals.mom.me confirms that Lionhead rabbits, because of their heavy coat, are more likely to succumb to the heat if kept outside during the summer months.

Bunnies that get a healthy and balanced diet live longer as compared to those getting poor nutrition. The lionhead rabbits diet should be well balanced because of their complex digestive systems . Their diet must include good quality hay such as Timothy hay, pellets, unlimited fresh and clean water as well as fresh leafy greens and treats of rabbit fruits and vegetables.

This implies that dwarf lionhead rabbits are expected to live for more years as compared to normal size or large ones. In general, wild bunnies are mostly exposed to various factors that cannot make them live longer. These include predation, adverse environmental conditions, and diseases among others, hence the survival of a wild rabbit is just by a probability.

Bunnies are homoeothermic animals (warm-blooded) this implies that they have a constant body temperature. Where the bunnies live must also have proper air circulation to eliminate poisonous gases like carbon (iv) oxide as well as the excess heat they produce from their body. Ensure their food has a lot of fibers since it will help prevent constipation as well as help grind down their teeth.

Both these two types of cancers can be reduced by neutering your bucks and spaying your does unless you intend to breed them. This will involve bushing them regularly and make their habitat very clean to avoid them being soiled that it will increase the chances of flystrike .

Are you considering a new pet? You may have heard about lionhead rabbits, but what exactly are they? In this guide, we will provide all the information you need to decide if a lionhead rabbit should be the next addition to your family!

The result was a gene mutation that created the appearance of a mane or a long ring of fur around the rabbits head. They get their name by their mane-like hair and are super cuddly because of it, but this long fur needs a lot of grooming.

Longer fur means more grooming, so be prepared for that if you opt for a double maned lionhead. You can purchase a special grooming brush either at your local pet store or online. Lionhead rabbits grow thicker coats over winter and then shed, or molt, during the spring.

However, when there is an excess of fur, it can quickly start to build up in the rabbits digestive tract. While normal amounts of hair are passed through their system, a build-up, or block can happen when the rabbit is molting. Between its own natural grooming abilities and your supplementary brushing, your lionhead rabbit will be as clean as needed.

When in the wild, rabbits will need to scratch their way around trees and shrubs, which will naturally wear down their nails. You should include scratching posts for your rabbit, but you will need to supplement with regular nail clipping. Go through your rabbits coat to check for any bug bites, including fleas and ticks.

Lionhead rabbits can be prone to misalignment of the teeth, which will lead to unnecessary wear and tear. You can buy it in bulk to save on costs but be prepared to make 70 to 75% of your rabbits diet hay. A rabbits teeth never stop growing and instead depend on external forces to keep them filed down.

If you notice your rabbits teeth starting to grow too long, then you will need to change its diet. In addition to hay, Lionhead rabbits will also eat a mix of raw fruit and vegetables. Hay75%High-fiber pellets20%Raw fruit and vegetables5% As most Lionhead rabbit owners will have a child or two at home, the lifespan of this animal is important to consider.

This is long enough to form an amazing bond with the animal, but not too short as to cause a child to worry about their demise. Its a good idea to find a vet that has experience with rabbits and to take your new pet in for routine checkups. As kittens, they will enjoy multiple toys, lots of games of chase, and zipping around the house.

As Lionhead bunnies become older, they will often settle down a bit and scope out their favorite place to laze around, or the warmest lap to sit on. If you arent worried about breeding, you still might want to consider spaying and neutering for behavioral reasons. Litterboxes can be placed inside a cage, as long as there is enough space for food, water, moving, and sleeping.

Choose a time when your rabbit is ready to play; if it is sleepy or hungry, it wont want to work with you. Begin to move the treat further back on the couch, to encourage her to start jumping. While your rabbit will most likely roam around, either inside or outside, they will need a place to sleep or be kept when no one else is at home.

Lionhead rabbits are less expensive than other pets, however, so are a good idea if you have some money to spend on a new family member but want to stay within budget. There are three main avenues to pursue when looking to purchase a Lionhead rabbit: personal sales, certified breeders, and animal shelters. Personal Sales If you look on any classified site, such as Kijiji or Craigslist, you will find a pet section.

If you are planning on a pet for your child, be prepared for a short time with an older rabbit. You can find certified breeders on classified sites but also check with local pet stores. Animal shelters can only house pets for so long before a different course of action needs to be taken.

Animal shelters will usually have a surplus of rabbits, including lionhead breeds, as they are not always the right fit for homeowners. Youll want to conduct routine checks to ensure their health is good. When you think about tiny Easter bunnies hopping around, the Netherland Dwarf rabbit will fit perfectly.

While their size is adorable, they arent as social as other breeds, and actually dont like to be picked up. While you may want to keep your lionhead rabbit outside, thinking it will like its more natural habitat, you have to remember that this breed is purely domestic. While you can leave it outside for short periods of time, it can quickly be found by predators such as coyotes, rabbits, and eagles.

Spayed or Neutered

Spayed and neutered rabbits regularly outlive unaltered rabbits. Not only do the procedures help control the pet population, they prevent life-threatening cancers from developing. According to the House Rabbit Society, an unaltered rabbit is at risk for development of uterine or testicular tumors around age two. That risk continues to increase with age, and these cancers often are life-threatening. Since spayed and neutered rabbits rarely suffer these cancers, the procedure is critical to a rabbit’s overall health and lifespan.

Grooming

When it comes to grooming, lionhead bunnies require significantly more attention than short-haired rabbits and must be brushed regularly. Not only does this brushing prevent painful matting, it helps decrease the risk of furballs. When rabbits groom themselves by licking, they sometimes ingest fur, causing furballs to form. Unlike other animals, rabbits cannot cough or vomit a furball loose, and these furballs can cause fatal intestinal blockages. Lionhair rabbits, because of their long hair, are particularly susceptible to fatal furballs. Proper grooming helps decrease this risk.

Indoor or Outdoor

Housing choices greatly impact a lionhead rabbit’s expected lifespan. The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals recommends all rabbits be housed indoors. Rabbits kept in outdoor hutches or pens are more likely to be victims of predators, such as cats, raccoons and hawks. Lionhead rabbits, because of their heavy coat, are more likely to succumb to the heat if kept outside during the summer months. Although housing a rabbit indoors presents its own set of challenges to keep a rabbit safe, it is a much safer alternative than keeping a rabbit outside.

What is a Lionhead Rabbit?

Lionhead Rabbits are small bunnies with compact, rounded bodies and are considered to be a fancy breed. The distinguishing factor between Lionhead bunnies and other breeds is that this breed has a “wool mane”. The similarity they share with the king of the animal kingdom, the Lion, is the reason that they were given their breed name. Normally, their mane is around 2 inches (5 cm) long. Lionheads are not only cute and perky, they are very good-natured bunnies who are also tolerant of children as well, and as such, they make wonderful pets for kids and adults alike. They also tend to be well-mannered, friendly, and easily trained. Learn more about their temperament!

A brief history

Lionheads were first created in Belgium by crossing two different dwarf sized breeds, although the debate of which two breeds were used, exactly, has left many scratching their heads in wonder. However, in doing the specific breed-crossing (quite possibly being that of a Swiss Fox and Netherland Dwarf) that was used, there was a gene mutation that occurred, causing this new breed to consistently produce a line of wool around the head region, and often times the flanks as well. This mutated gene is now referred to as the “mane” gene.

Is my bunny Single or Double mane?

There are 2 types of mane’s that a Lionhead could have. The mane (a distinctive tuft of long fur) of a Lionhead is a thick, wooly fur which is soft and has a presence of crimping. This wool covering will surround the head area, and often times the flank area, of the rabbit. The only true way to tell if your rabbit is either a double or single mane specimen is to examine it directly after birth.The number of mane-genes that a Lionhead gets from each parent, determines whether it is a double mane (two mane genes) or a single mane (one mane gene) rabbit. A double mane Lionhead will have a noticeable V form around their skirt, while a single mane will look like a any other rabbit directly after birth. Additionally, there is also what is referred to as a no-mane Lionhead, in which case that rabbit will not have received any mane-genes at all.

Factors that determine a lionhead rabbit’s lifespan

The lionhead rabbit is said to be one of the newest breeds that were accepted by the British Rabbit Council (BRC) in 2002.It was named as lionhead since it had the ‘mane’ of wool around its head which is like that of a lion. As rabbitmatters.com notes, “the slightly rounded and broadhead is set close to the body with short thick upright ears, 2″-3″ (5cm-7.5cm) in length, and a well-developed muzzle.”On their personality, they are very friendly, lively, playful and well-natured bunnies with you will find very social.They are a small bunny breed with a fully-grown weight of 1.13 kg and 1.70 kg.Before we state the lifespan of a lionhead rabbit, we want to clarify that, there are many variables that will determine the lifespan including any other bunny breed. These aspects include care, diet, safety, whether wild or domestic and so on.

Housing choices – indoor or outdoor?

How long do lionhead rabbits live outdoors and indoors? This is one of the questions that many of our readers have raised.The answer, we will state that a lionhead bunny that is kept indoors tends to live longer when we compare them with the one that lives outdoors.This is because those kept in outdoor hutches or sheds are vulnerable to predators, infections, adverse environmental conditions as well as diseases caused by rodents and rats that sneak into their hutches. This is because bunny cages and hutches may provide enough protection, especially at night.However, those that are kept indoors are protected especially from adverse environmental conditions as well as the predators hence increasing their lifespan. Moreover, there are high chances of escape by outdoor lionhead bunnies or being stressed in case of attacks by a predator or sees it.Note that domestic bunnies that have escaped do not have adaptive features that can increase their chances of survival in the wild. Most of them do not have colors that blend their background to prevent predators from noticing them, hence they are probable targets.Animals.mom.me confirms that “Lionhead rabbits, because of their heavy coat, are more likely to succumb to the heat if kept outside during the summer months. Although housing a rabbit indoors presents its own set of challenges to keep a rabbit safe, it is a much safer alternative than keeping a rabbit outside.”

Rabbit provided

Bunnies that get a healthy and balanced diet live longer as compared to those getting poor nutrition. The lionhead rabbit’s diet should be well balanced because of their complex digestive systems.Their diet must include good quality hay such as Timothy hay, pellets, unlimited fresh and clean water as well as fresh leafy greens and treats of rabbit fruits and vegetables.

Size

The size of a lionhead bunny is essential in determining how long it may live. To be specific, the small bunnies always live longer than larger ones. This implies that dwarf lionhead rabbits are expected to live for more years as compared to normal size or large ones.Also, sexual maturity in dwarf bunny is faster as compared to larger bunny breeds.

Grooming

As far as grooming is concerned, lionhead needs more attention than those with a short coat. They brushed regularly to prevent matting and the risk of furballs. Unlike other cats and dogs, the bunnies are cannot cough out furballs (regurgitate) and thus if not properly groomed, they may suffer from furballs.

How to make lionhead rabbits live longer

If you want to lengthen their lifespan, there are several things you could do which include the following:

Conducive living environment

They need a peaceful and quiet living environment. Where they live should be like a rest area, specifically in the daytime because they are generally nocturnal.Maintain a favorable temperature especially lionhead rabbits. They do not need a lot of heat because of their heavy fur. Bunnies are homoeothermic animals (warm-blooded) this implies that they have a constant body temperature.They control their body temperature through homeostatic processes that rely on how much they eat, the rate of breathing and their body position, therefore, the temperature should be maintained at a range of between 30-35℃ which is the optimal temperature.Otherwise, a rise in temperature above the optimum level will pose a problem to them because of their inability to regulate their body temperature at that point i.e. 42℃. This may lead to a health complication called hyperthermia.Keep the humidity level in their habitat constant as they are also sensitive to change in humidity. A change to the humidity below the favorable levels can lead to discomfort.Where the bunnies live must also have proper air circulation to eliminate poisonous gases like carbon (iv) oxide as well as the excess heat they produce from their body. Avoid areas with the strong blowing wind.

Proper nutrition

Ensure that food is availed is regularly both in daytime and night time. Ensure the rabbit feeders including the hay feeders keep the food fresh (is not soiled).Also, never give them pellets all the time since uncontrollably feeding on pellets can lead to obesity, liver as well as heart diseases, diarrheas and kidney diseases. This is due to the low fiber and higher carbohydrate contents in the pellets. Again, never overfeed your bunnies.Ensure their food has a lot of fibers since it will help prevent constipation as well as help grind down their teeth. Also, give them an adequate amount of hay such as

Spraying or neutering

Neutering or spaying increases a rabbit’s lifespan. Unaltered bunnies are at risk of developing a testicular tumor (for bucks) or uterine tumor (for does) at the tender age of around 2 years which increases as it grows. The cancer is life-threatening.Both these two types of cancers can be reduced by neutering your bucks and spaying your does unless you intend to breed them.Also, make sure their foods are clean and are not contaminated. This would prevent your pet from being exposed to various health issues.

Proper grooming

Groom them regularly to avoid matting and furballs. This will involve bushing them regularly and make their habitat very clean to avoid them being soiled that it will increase the chances of flystrike. Do not forget to check for overgrown teeth and nails.

Avail clean and freshwater

Clean and fresh water for drinking should be availed to your bunnies. You have an option of going for the various good rabbit bottles, bowls or install and automated bunny waterer.

Proper handling

Support the hindquarters whenever you want to lift your furry friend up. Also, whenever you want to lift it, do it when near the floor to prevent far jump.

History and Origins

If you’ve come to this guide, the most obvious piece of information you’re after isRelatively new to the scene,The exact origin of lionhead rabbits isn’t known, but many speculate that they came about by aWhen it comes to status, we can look to the competition world, and both the American Rabbit Breeders Association (ARBA) and in the United Kingdom, the British Rabbit Council (BRC). Both organizations recognized the Lionhead rabbit in the last decade. As a result,

How to care for Lionhead Rabbits

Lionhead rabbits are perfect for anyone who wants a domestic pet and isn’t afraid of trying something new. Lionhead rabbits are the perfect combination of playful sillies and quiet cuddles.

Grooming

They get their name by their mane-like hair and are super cuddly because of it, but this long fur needs a lot of grooming. Ideally, you shouldThis is the case whether your rabbit has a single mane or a double mane. A single mane will be mostly covered with medium length fur, and a Double Mane Lionhead is more than 50% covered with long fur.You can purchase a special grooming brush either at your local pet store or online.Hold the rabbit with one hand and gently work your way through their mane and down their coat.Lionhead rabbits grow thicker coats over winter and then shed, or molt, during the spring.When Lionhead rabbits molt, you will need to brush their coats up to three times a week.Your rabbit will want to help with the process and groom, or lick itself, which it will do year-round. However, when there is an excess of fur, it can quickly start to build up in the rabbit’s digestive tract.While normal amounts of hair are passed through their system, a build-up, or block can happen when the rabbit is molting.

Nail clipping

When in the wild, rabbits will need to scratch their way around trees and shrubs, which will naturally wear down their nails. In a residential setting, this won’t be possible for your lionhead rabbit. You should include scratching posts for your rabbit, but you will need to supplement with regular nail clipping.Ideally, clip your lionhead rabbit’s nails once a month.Go through your rabbit’s coat to check for any bug bites, including fleas and ticks. Also, look for any lumps that could be a sign of a more serious illness.Another part of your rabbit to check each month is their teeth. Lionhead rabbits can be prone to misalignment of the teeth, which will lead to unnecessary wear and tear.Check your rabbit’s teeth to see if they line up and if there are any sore spots along the gums. As always, if you think there is anything serious, be sure to visit your vet.

Diet

In the wild, rabbits eat grasses, seeds, fruits, and vegetables. For your Lionhead rabbit, you should also provide a varied diet.You can buy it in bulk to save on costs but be prepared to make 70 to 75% of your rabbit’s diet hay. Hay is crucial to help your rabbit’s teeth from growing too large.A rabbit’s teeth never stop growing and instead depend on external forces to keep them filed down. If you notice your rabbit’s teeth starting to grow too long, then you will need to change its diet.In addition to hay,

Lifespan

As most Lionhead rabbit owners will have a child or two at home, the lifespan of this animal is important to consider. Too short and you can risk really upsetting a child. Too long, and you might need to re-house your new pet because of unforeseen circumstances.Thankfully,Like most animals, the more well-cared-for your Lionhead rabbit is, the longer they are likely to live.However, certain problems can always arise. It’s a good idea to find a vet that has experience with rabbits and to take your new pet in for routine checkups.This way if there are any health problems, you can work to prevent them from becoming serious.

Temperament

Not only are they lively and energetic, but they also like to snuggle.As Lionhead bunnies become older, they will often settle down a bit and scope out their favorite place to laze around, or the warmest lap to sit on.Lionheads are extremely good natured, and combined with the genetic mutation that gives them the long fur around their heads are not only a pleasant pet to spend time with, but pleasant to look at as well.

When to spay and neuter

There are two main types of lionhead rabbits:Interestingly, though, you can’t actually tell the difference between a single mane and a double mane rabbit as an adult. They are only discernable at birth. To tell the difference, look for a V formation around the belly of a rabbit. This will signify it is a double mane breed.Within the lionhead rabbit umbrella, there are different categories for colors.

Tricks and training

If you’ve ever wanted a cross between a dog and a cat, that would be the Lionhead rabbit. Not only does it snuggle like a cat, but it can be trained to perform tricks like a dog!

Going into cage

That’s right – your lionhead rabbit can be litterbox trained! The thought of having a rabbit given free-range inside a house inevitably leads to one thought- will there be poop everywhere? Thankfully, the answer is no.

Costs

A Lionhead rabbit is fairly inexpensive to purchase, ranging anywhere from $50 to $100. However,Another expense to consider is your lionhead rabbit’s home. While your rabbit will most likely roam around, either inside or outside, they will need a place to sleep or be kept when no one else is at home. Again, costs vary, but a shelter could be anywhere from $50 to $200.Before purchasing any pet, it’s important to really think about your budget. Too many pets are returned or re-housed because they are just too expensive to maintain. Lionhead rabbits are less expensive than other pets, however, so are a good idea if you have some money to spend on a new family member but want to stay within budget.

Where to purchase

There are three main avenues to pursue when looking to purchase a Lionhead rabbit: personal sales, certified breeders, and animal shelters.If you look on any classified site, such as Kijiji or Craigslist, you will find a pet section. This will be the easiest way to find someone who is personally selling a lionhead rabbit. Often these rabbits will be slightly older and may not have been the right fit for their owners. Or, they could be from a litter of rabbits.If you go this route, be sure to get as much information as possible. Any past medical histories, including that of the rabbit’s parents, is important to know. If the seller is giving away an older lionhead rabbit, ask how old it is. Remember: lionhead rabbits live about 4 to 7 years. If you are planning on a pet for your child, be prepared for a short time with an older rabbit.If you want a baby lionhead rabbit, also known as a kit, then a certified breeder will be your best option. You can find certified breeders on classified sites but also check with local pet stores. The more information you have about the breeder, the better.While rabbit breeders aren’t often in the news, there are far too many horror stories about puppy mills and unfit breeders. You don’t want to support a person who doesn’t care about their animals. Ask for pictures and if they are near you, ask for a tour of their place.If you decide to breed your own lionhead rabbits, then you will need to purchase a pair from a breeder. All the necessary paperwork and lineage must be kept for future buyers.If possible, check out your local animal shelter for your next lionhead rabbit. Animal shelters can only house pets for so long before a different course of action needs to be taken. And the longer any animal is in a shelter, the bigger the financial burden there will be.Animal shelters will usually have a surplus of rabbits, including lionhead breeds, as they are not always the right fit for homeowners. Check your local shelter and give an animal its next lease on life.

Alternative rabbits

Not convinced a lionhead rabbit will work for you? You might want to consider these alternatives.

Lop rabbit

Who doesn’t love a bunny with floppy ears? The lop rabbit, which also comes in a miniature version, is the epitome of cuteness. Its ears are extremely floppy and droop well past their shoulders. Their temperament is rather nice, and they are always up for a snuggle. The one thing to caution is that with their long ears comes a propensity for ear infections. You’ll want to conduct routine checks to ensure their health is good.

Netherland Dwarf Rabbit

Lionhead rabbits were bread by both the Swiss Fox rabbit and the Netherland Dwarf rabbit. It makes sense that the latter will appear on this list. When you think about tiny Easter bunnies hopping around, the Netherland Dwarf rabbit will fit perfectly. It is tiny, weighing less than 3 pounds. While their size is adorable, they aren’t as social as other breeds, and actually don’t like to be picked up.

Rex Rabbit

These rabbits have very unique fur that is short and thick. They often have distinguishable markings on their backs, often in zig-zag patterns. Rex rabbits also come in mini versions, if you’re looking for something a bit smaller. They are incredibly social and playful. Health-wise, their thick fur means double duty for brushing to avoid fur-block

How large will a lionhead rabbit get?

Lionhead rabbits are rather small, thanks to their original parents. They will grow to be about 3 pounds in weight and about 8 to 10 inches in length. Their ears will be less than 3 inches long. Their mane, which circles their head, will be about 2 inches long.

Can I keep my rabbit outside?

While you may want to keep your lionhead rabbit outside, thinking it will like it’s more natural habitat, you have to remember that this breed is purely domestic. It was bread to be a pet and as such, should be kept inside. While you can leave it outside for short periods of time, it can quickly be found by predators such as coyotes, rabbits, and eagles. Even in a cage, your rabbit is not safe, so it’s best not to keep it outside at night.