How Long Do Hamsters Live?

As you consider whether or not to purchase a hamster, one question you may want to consider is how long your adorable new friend will be a part of your family for. Learn more about how long most hamsters live, and what you can do to ensure that your new, cuddly creature will live a full, healthy life under your roof, below.

They may jump or bite if startled and can also develop stress related diseases, such as proliferative ileitis. As such, it is recommended to remain seated on the ground or a large couch while calmly handling your fuzzy friend and keep your hamsters habitat to just a single level to prevent it from falling from inside its home.

How long do hamsters live as pets?

Hamsters usually live for up to two years, although some may live for longer.

Can hamsters live for 5 years?

On average, hamsters live between two and two and half years. Some breeds may live shorter or longer than this. … However, you can take certain measures to make sure you’re giving your hamster as high quality a life possible. This may prolong his life.

How old is the oldest hamster?

The oldest hamster ever was 4.5 years old, and was owned by Karen Smeaton of Tyne & Wear, United Kingdom. Hi, my daughter’s hamster Bunia, lived to be 6 years old.

How long does a Syrian hamster live for?

Golden hamster / Lifespan

Why is it important to find out how long hamsters live before buying one? Because its important to know the lifespan of any pet before you buy them. It tells you how long youll need to care for them.

Of course, this applies to all pets and is as true for hamsters as it is for cats, dogs or any other animal you choose to keep. So, its important to find out: how long do hamsters live?

Like all other animals, there is no fixed amount of time that a hamster will live for. Just some of the factors that affect how long a hamster will live are: Species Genetics Diet Exercise Living environment Illness Quality of care

Some hamsters will have inherited genes from their parent and grandparents that help them to live a long life, while other hamsters will have inherited genes that lead to a shorter lifespan. Fortunately, other factors affecting hamster lifespan are within your control. Feeding them a healthy diet Encouraging them to exercise Giving them a nice, clean home If you can afford it, we recommend investing in a spacious and high quality hamster cage, like these ones Looking out for signs of illness and treating any problems quickly and effectively Generally taking good care of them and keeping them healthy and happy

Buy food to add to you hamsters diet: However, the lifespan varies depending on the type of hamster and ranges from 1.5 to 3.5 years. From longest to shortest, the following are the average lifespans of the five most popular hamster species:

Generally speaking though, the above lifespans should give you a good idea of what to expect when choosing which type of hamster to keep.

Youre off to get yourself a hamster friend ? Great ! Youll need to know how long hamsters live for, so you know whether to get this kind of pet or not.

Ill give you examples with my Teddy (Syrian, male hammy) to make things clearer too. Of course, there are hamsters who can outlive the average, like cases of Syrian hammies living for 5-6 years in captivity.

Were going to go through each factor, and see how you can make your hamster friend lead a long and happy life. So keep in mind that the inherited traits like breed , genetics, illness will outweigh the elements you can control. Take solace in knowing that you can, in fact, make your hamsters life much easier and more comfortable, even if some things you cant change.

There are 5 species in total to pick from, though not all pet shops will carry all 5, and Ive never seen all 5 present at the same time. The breed (and the coat color and sex) is all you can pick when it comes to the hamsters genetic makeup. Some breeders aim for a docile line of hamsters, or more variation in coat colors, or size perhaps.

So you wont know if a black Syrian hamster comes with a gene that gives him weak kidneys and leads to a shorter lifespan. Or a white Robo hammy that somehow manages to live to the ripe age of 7, because his coat color gene comes with a long lifespan. However what you can count on is that the Dwarf types have an inherited risk of developing diabetes much faster that the Syrians.

Whichever genes your hamster inherited youll be able to give him a wonderful life is you take into account the elements Ive listed below. Lets see how to maximize all these elements so you give your hamster one happy, long life with you. Whatever you decide to give your hamster friend, youll find more info in the links provided above.

Do keep in mind that Dwarf hammies should be kept away from sweet foods (fruits, some veggies, most treats) since it will raise their chances of getting Diabetes. A Syrian is double the size of a Dwarf, and all hamsters love to hoard their food. This will give our hammy the opportunity to run as far and as much as his little feet can carry him, with energy to spare.

Pet hamsters still have this instinct, much like domestic cats will pounce a laser dot or a dog will howl at the moon. This means an exercise bal l. Your hammy can use it to explore your home and cover more ground than he would in his cage. Cage size and cleanliness There is a required minimum for a hamsters habitat.

Do keep in mind that while hamsters do climb and use the levels of a multi-level cage, why prefer the ground floor. This gives them more security, and its safe for them hamsters are horrible at calculating depth and distances, and will jump from heights . For more info on safe and unsafe hamster bedding material, check out this article .

If you want to know how to tame your hamster friend without getting your hand bitten off, you need to read this article . The placement of the cage in your home is crucial to how well the hamster can rest , and how safe he feels. If you notice your hamster being scared of you, rest assured this will go away in time with efforts on your part.

Even in homes, baby hamsters dont have a 100% survival rate, because of their mothers most of the time. You see hamster mothers are very skittish and nervous, and will resort to eating their babies if they feel in any way threatened. At this stage it becomes crucial to separate the hamster babies into male and female enclosures.

He still has an immense amount of energy, needs to run , climb, hide, and generally investigate every new sound. Then youll look at his cute fuzzy face when he wakes up, stretching, and know it was the best choice ever.

Hamsters are fun animals and can make good first pets for children, provided you understand what they need to be healthy and happy. Find out more about them on this page, and then why not take a look at all the hamsters we have available for rehoming?

Hamsters enjoy exploring and use their whiskers to help them sense objects in their environment.

How Long do Hamsters Live?

A hamster’s lifespan is a good deal shorter than that of most other common household critters, and any of the five species of domesticated hamster will generally live for two to three years, says Claudie, “The Hamster Whisperer” and proprietor of the Westchester Rescued Hamster Haven. Any hamster that is a year and a half old is considered elderly, she says, and how much your hamster shows his or her age will depend on a number of things, including their individual personality and energy level. Fortunately, there are a few things you can do to help your hamster live a healthy, fulfilling life.

What affects the hamster’s lifespan

There are inherited factors, like the hamster’s predisposition for an illness, or faulty genetics, as well as controllable factors like the quality of care the hamster gets.We’re going to go through each factor, and see how you can make your hamster friend lead a long and happy life.So keep in mind that the inherited traits – like breed, genetics, illness – will outweigh the elements you can control. For example if you’ve got a Robo hamster (which can live up to 4 years) with early onset diabetes, he might only live to 2 years, even with a wonderfully precise diet. Otherwise he might have lived a much shorter life.Take solace in knowing that you can, in fact, make your hamster’s life much easier and more comfortable, even if some things you can’t change.

Things you can’t control about the hamster

Alright, let’s see the inherited traits that will affect your hamster’s life. There are 2 major ones, and we’ll discuss them here.

2. Genes and other inherited traits

You can indeed pick your hamster’s breed. When you go to the pet store and see all the available hammies, you will probably have to choose between a Syrian and a Dwarf type. There are 5 species in total to pick from, though not all pet shops will carry all 5, and I’ve never seen all 5 present at the same time. There are:There are certain differences in the genetics of all 5 breeds, but they don’t differ all that much. The breed (and the coat color and sex) is all you can pick when it comes to the hamster’s genetic makeup.

1. Diet and additional foods

Diet is incredibly important for your hamster friend. Actually it’s more important than exercise, and that’s true for hamsters as well as other animals.What we eat has more impact that what we do. Which is why your hamster’s feed must be a high-quality feed, and whatever else you give him as treats must be safe.So, here is a clear list of safe and unsafe hamster foods. Those are foods you’ve already got in your pantry or fridge, and can give to you hamster either as regular food, or as a treat.Hamsters in general can eat anything, with a few exceptions. You can give them fruits, vegetables, nuts and peanuts, some types of meat, and even bread sometimes !Whatever you decide to give your hamster friend, you’ll find more info in the links provided above. Do keep in mind that Dwarf hammies should be kept away from sweet foods (fruits, some veggies, most treats) since it will raise their chances of getting Diabetes.Also if you feed your hamster a commercial food mix, remember to not overfeed your hamster. This can only lead to obesity, which will lead to less exercise, which will lead to further weight gain, and serious health problems.
So do not panic if you’ve just fed your hammy and half an hour later everything’s gone. It’s okay, the food is tucked away in the hammy’s food stash, and he’ll nibble on it whenever he needs it.

2. Exercise

Your hamster will need plenty of exercise throughout his life. Especially as a young hamster. Young ones have a tremendous amount of energy, much like toddler humans, and will want to explore everything. All at once. And run there, see that, sniff this other thing too.So a running wheel is absolutely mandatory for a healthy hamster. This will give our hammy the opportunity to run as far and as much as his little feet can carry him, with energy to spare.You see, in the wild hamsters always have to be on the run, and they’ve got amazing reflexes. They have to, in order to stay alive.Pet hamsters still have this instinct, much like domestic cats will pounce a laser dot or a dog will howl at the moon. After all, hamsters have only been pets for the last century or so, and they’re pretty much the same as they were in the wild.Another option is to give your hamster time outside the cage. This means an exercise ball. Your hammy can use it to explore your home and cover more ground than he would in his cage. It’s also a better and more intense workout than his usual running wheel.For this same reason hiding and climbing toys are important for the hamster too. They give your hamster something to do, and keep him away from the cage bars.A hamster with no exercise option will become irritable, nippy, and obese. This is never a good combination, neither for the hamster, or for you as an owner.

3. Cage size and cleanliness

There is a required minimum for a hamster’s habitat. For example a Syrian hamster needs a cage of 24 x 12 inches, and about 12 inches tall. That’s 61 x 30.5 cm, and about 30.5 cm tall.That’s the absolute minimum, and I honestly would recommend looking for a cage larger than that. If you’ve got a Dwarf hamster he can live in such a cage easily enough.Unfortunately most cages on the market or in pet shops are not larger than the minimum, most not even respecting the minimum space requirement. Do keep in mind that while hamsters do climb and use the levels of a multi-level cage, why prefer the ground floor.This gives them more security, and it’s safe for them – hamsters are horrible at calculating depth and distances, and will jump from heights.Also if you’ve got a tube system installed your hammy will go nuts over it. My Teddy has a tube connecting 2 levels and he’s in it half the time. Hammies are attracted to small, cramped spaces. Their homes in the wild are composed of many tunnels, actually.As for the cage cleanliness, most of the time it’s okay to change the hamster’s bedding once per week, and can be stretched to once every two weeks.You see, hamsters are very clean animals, and they don’t smell. The only thing about them that can get smelly is their pee corner. That’s a specific corner in the cage that the hamster will use to pee. Always the same corner, the farthest away from his hideout.Make sure you use safe bedding options, like aspen wood shavings, or soft paper bedding. For more info on safe and unsafe hamster bedding material, check out this article. It also covers the cleaning routine in much more depth than I can here.

4. General care and stress

Aside from everything we’ve discussed so far, the general care your hamster receives is going to decide how comfortable he feels around you, or in your home.This means that the temperature must be at a certain range for his comfort – that’s 20-23 C/68-75 F, and kept well away from any drafts or direct sunlight.Handling your hamster will also be important. The is a too little, and a too much, and they’re both influenced by the hamster’s personality. If you want to know how to tame your hamster friend without getting your hand bitten off, you need to read this article.As for whether they like being held, they generally do, once they’re tame. But many steps need to be taken before a solitary, not very cuddly hamster will feel okay being picked up.The placement of the cage in your home is crucial to how well the hamster can rest, and how safe he feels. If you notice your hamster being scared of you, rest assured this will go away in time with efforts on your part. You can read this article to know how to ease a scared hamster.A very stressed hamster will be a nippy, irritable hamster. he will be hard to handle until you remove the stress source. Unfortunately many things can stress him out, so you should check out this article, since it will shed some light on what having a hammy is like.

5. To pair or not to pair

You’ve probably seen hamsters kept together before. Or even heard of a pair of hamsters being kept together. While this isn’t unusual, it’s not the best idea.True, Dwarf hamsters can live in pairs. But they require a much larger size cage than the minimum of 24 x 12 inches, and about 12 inches tall. That’s 61 x 30.5 cm, and about 30.5 cm tall.This is because hamsters are very territorial. While they can get along if they have no other choice, they will always prefer to live alone.Hamsters kept in pairs can become stressed, and one of them will eventually try to bully the other one. You can find out more about why hammies fight and how to separate them here.Syrian hamsters, as well as Chinese Dwarfs, will fight to the death any creature put in their cage, be it another hamster or a rabbit.So the most humane and comfortable thing to do for your hamster buddies is to keep them separated. I know this might go against many people you’ve heard say it’s fine to put them together. It’s an added stress, and it builds up in time.

When is a hamster old ?

When looking for answers on the general lifespan of a hamster, you’ll want to know when your hamster becomes a senior. This is part of the natural order of things, and every hamster will grow old and grey.Still, that does not mean old age in hamsters is terrible. Some may become blind, some may get an illness quicker. But most lead fairly normal lives up until their end.A hamster can be considered old when he reaches his second birthday. In the case of a Robo hammie, who can live up to 4 years this threshold can be extended to about 3 years.While for a Chinese that usually lives for two years, he can be considered old when he-s 1-1.5 years old.ButThat’d make him about a year and half old as I’m writing this. He doesn’t yet waddle, or lose his fur, although he’s getting close to his second birthday.But he has lost quite some energy, and sleeps much more than he used to. His fur is a bit silver around his ears, and he’s become very picky with his food.Still, he’s the same funny little furball we know. Always curious, always coming up for a treat, still panicked from time to time.

The life cycle of a hamster

From birth to his final days, a hamster pet will always be a wonderful little thing. Right from the moment the hamster is born, he could possibly be in danger.Even in homes, baby hamsters don’t have a 100% survival rate, because of their mothers most of the time. You see hamster mothers are very skittish and nervous, and will resort to eating their babies if they feel in any way threatened.She may also do this if the baby hamster is ill or she thinks it’s too weak to survive to adulthood.So it’s best to leave a hamster mother alone for 2-3 weeks after she’s given birth and only just feed her. Absolutely no handling or cleaning or saying hi. More on that in the link above.Once the hamster has survived his first few weeks, he will be weaned. That usually happens around 3-4 weeks of age. At this stage it becomes crucial to separate the hamster babies into male and female enclosures.This is because even so young, they can start to reproduce, and no one wants surprise litters, plus the fact that the incredibly young mother has a very low chance of survival.You can find out more about how to figure out your hamster’s gender here. Once the babies have been separated, they end up at a pet shop or given away to prospective owners.This should all happen up until the hamster’s 12th weeks or life, or his 3rd month. This is when he has become an adult, and will start showing most of his fur marking and personality.He still has an immense amount of energy, needs to run, climb, hide, and generally investigate every new sound.Once the hamster has become a senior, around 2 years old, his metabolism will start to slow down. He may become blind, or develop an illness, or maybe just die peacefully in his sleep. It’s much like with human seniors, some are worn down and tired in their 50s, some are vibrant and energetic even in their 70s.

What owning a hamster is like

Finally, a hamster is a commitment. They may not live very long lives, like a cat or a dog. But they are still souls that need your attention and care.Sometimes you will have to schedule things around them, or not be able to leave town until you’ve found a sitter to look after them.There will be moments when you wonder why you got yourself a rodent, of all things. Then you’ll look at his cute fuzzy face when he wakes up, stretching, and know it was the best choice ever.Honestly when I got my Teddy I knew nothing about hamsters. I knew they had short lives, and were fuzzy. This whole blog is dedicated to folks like me, who had no idea about hammies and want to know everything there is. How to care for them, how to play with them, cages, toys, everything.You can check out this article to see some pros and cons of owning a hamster here. You’ll get a feel for how a hamster changes your life, and understand them better.Aside from all this, I’d only recommend a hamster as a pet to more mellow, quiet people. You see hamsters are very sensitive, and need much patience and gentle handling.A child for example would not be a good owner for a hamster. Children simply don’t have the patience and care for a hamster. A guinea pig, on the other hand, might be better suited for them.A hamster will bite when handled wrong, try to escape at the drop of a hat, and be endlessly curious. They’re not exactly low maintenance in that regard.

Hamsters

Hamsters are fun animals and can make good first pets for children, provided you understand what they need to be healthy and happy. Find out more about them on this page, and then why not take a look at all the hamsters we have available for rehoming?