How Long Do Goldfish Live?

This is a question that more than 4393 of our readers have been asking us! Luckily, we have found the most appropriate information for you!

The Goldfish is a truly classic fish. It has been bred for fishkeeping since the 19th century, and to this day it can be found in pet shops all over the world.

There are many different varieties and breeds available, all designed to fit into just about any freshwater habitat. They are often bought for children and beginner fish keepers with the belief that they will not live for very long. These fish are members of the Carp family Cyprinidae, which are known for their long lifespans both in the wild and in captivity. Goldfish are a domesticated variant of wild Carp and they will live longer if they are housed in an outdoor pond setup that closely mimics their natural habitat. Proper tank conditions, room to grow, and a healthy and balanced diet make all the difference. Fancy Goldfish are double tailed breeds specially bred for their decorative appearance. Heavily modified breeds like the Ranchu and the Bubble Eye may only live up to a maximum of 5 years. Telescopes are bred to live for 12 to 14 years, but it’s possible that they may have problems with vision and coordination. Oranda This breed lives for an average of 15 years, and can reach the age of 20 in a spacious outdoor setup. They will also be exposed to natural light and seasonal variation that affects the fish’s biology and physiology. All breeds benefit from a more natural lifestyle as it lets them use their wild instincts and live the longest possible life. If you want your fish to live a long life, but still want to keep them in an indoor aquarium, this method gives you the best of both worlds. When waste is produced in large amounts in an enclosed space like a tank, things can get dirty really quickly. Dirt and grime can build up to dangerous levels long before it begins to show. In addition to temperature, these fish can be sensitive to drastic changes in pH and dissolved oxygen. In the wild Goldfish eat zooplankton, insects and microworms along with aquatic plants and algae. Any flakes or pellets that you give them should have a good balance of protein and vegetable content. In both tanks and ponds, feed them water fleas, brine shrimp, and tubifex worms. Goldfish that are sold in bowls are meant to be moved into a large tank or pond. A fish named Tish made the Guinness Book of World Records as the longest living Goldfish . Your fish is not likely to live this long, but it just goes to show how much of a difference a good environment will make.

How long do goldfish live in a fishbowl?

Author Note: A Goldfish living in a bowl is lucky to make it to one year. Even if you do things right and perform frequent water changes, the average lifespan in a bowl is only two to three years.

How long do goldfish live in a home?

What is the average lifespan of a pet goldfish? On average, pet goldfish live 10 to 15 years. However, if if they aren’t kept in good housing conditions, they usually will live no longer than 5 years.

Do goldfish die easily?

Just a quick plug for goldfish before we get into this: They have a reputation for being short-lived and dying easily. … The conditions that will bring a perfectly healthy goldfish to death overnight will probably kill ANY other fish just as quickly or even more quickly, hands-down.

Do goldfish get lonely?

There’s no definite way of knowing whether goldfish get lonely. … However, we can say that it is very unlikely that goldfish get lonely. Goldfish are just not the same as humans – they’re not social animals in the same way that we are, and they don’t have the same capacity to get bored or long for companionship.

The lifespan of a Goldfish can vary more than almost anything else in the aquarium scene. For such a common fish, the answer to “how long do Goldfish live” is actually quite complicated!

If you provide them with great care and keep them in excellent conditions, you’ll probably have them for quite a while! Most people assume that these fish are temporary pets with a short life expectancy. With their wide availability, low cost, and history of being used as prizes at the carnival, there’s a lot of misinformation about how long Goldfish live. Author Note: This is due to the prevalence of poor breeding practices and insufficient care by many of the people who buy them. In fact, the average lifespan for a common Goldfish tends to be closer to four or five years. Many of them have double fins, which hampers their ability to swim fast like a Common Goldfish. Due to so much selective breeding, these fish have developed round bodies that are more prone to disease (like dropsy ). In poor living conditions, Fancy Goldfish have a much higher risk of suffering from a disease. For super modified species, such as the Bubble Eye and Ranchu, health issues are very widespread. They’re more sensitive to changes in water quality, which can lead to a host of problems for those who are less-than-dedicated to maintaining the tank. Without the proper filtration that comes with an established tank, ammonia and nitrate levels can increase dramatically. Author Note: A Goldfish living in a bowl is lucky to make it to one year. Even if you do things right and perform frequent water changes, the average lifespan in a bowl is only two to three years. At the very least, you should be keeping this fish in aquariums that can hold 20 gallons in order to maximize their lifespan. Those bacteria are responsible for breaking down waste keeping ammonia levels low. When you have to constantly replace the water in a small fishbowl, that bacteria aren’t able to get established in the tank. But, larger aquariums have the tools you need to keep things more stable in the long run. Scrub the inside of the glass, utilize a gravel vacuum, and remove any leftover food. Test the water regularly to ensure that ammonia and nitrate levels are not detectable. Stick to a high-quality flake or nutritionally balanced pellet food as the staple of their diet. Goldfish do very well when fed high-protein snacks like brine shrimp, water fleas, and tubifex worms. Creating a Goldfish pond allows you to closely replicate their natural habitat, which will have a big impact on their lifespan. No matter how hard you try, there’s just no way to perfectly replicate natural light and seasonal variations in an indoor aquarium. Instead of staying a measly two or three inches, some species can reach their full potential in a pond. Depending on the care they receive and the breeding practices of the seller, you’re looking at a difference of up to 15 years!

Setting up a goldfish habitat can be a big investment since these bright and active fish need plenty of space to grow to their maximum potential. Before dropping a lot of money on equipment and fish, it’s natural to investigate their life expectancy. How long do goldfish live, and how can you ensure your fish reach their Golden Years?

I’ve noticed that many people don’t expect their pet goldfish to be around for very long. Afterall, feeder goldfish are often sold for less than a dollar and given away in school events and at county fairs. There are hundreds of varieties of goldfish in the world, and your fish’s genetics and their early development will set natural limits on their possible lifespan. In a Pond or Large Aquarium Since goldfish have been domesticated for thousands of years, we can’t really examine their life expectancy under natural conditions in the wild. Assuming they receive high-quality care and are not eaten by a raccoon or other predator, pond goldfish can easily survive for 20 to 40 years depending on their type. Aquarium-kept fish rarely live as long as their pond-raised siblings unless they are kept in very roomy tanks with excellent filtration and top-notched maintenance. My three Common goldfish were 12 years old when I had to sell them as I left town to start college. In a Fishbowl I’ve never seen a bowl-raised goldfish that survived more than a couple of years, and I’d guess that the vast majority die within weeks. Even with diligent care, a goldfish in a bowl simply won’t live very long. This reduces their immune system and metabolism, which causes them to stop growing and predisposes them to illness. Stress hormones wreak havoc on their bodies, leading to disease and death. The Guinness Book of World officially lists a 43-year old goldfish by the name of Tish as the oldest ever recorded! The hearty single-tailed varieties like the Common (feeder) and Comet goldfish are the ones we typically see reaching the 20 to 40 range. Their squat bodies and special features like their double-tails, fancy fins, head growths, bubbles, and telescoping eyes are associated with health problems that reduce their longevity and lifespan. The tougher varieties of fancy goldfish, like the Fantail, Oranda , and Ryukin, often make it past their 10th birthday and well into their teens, especially if they are raised in a pond. But it’s unlikely you’ll see this kind of longevity from fish with telescoping or bubble eyes. You may have noticed that most varieties of goldfish have a fairly wide range when it comes to their life expectancy. The better you accommodate your goldfish and maintain their style of living, the longer you can expect them to survive! Natural sunlight and seasonal variations go a long way to keeping goldfish healthy, lean and active. They will also naturally feed on insects, eggs and plant materials in your pond in addition to their usual diet. While I wouldn’t recommend trying to keep the very delicate types of goldfish in ponds, other fancies can survive outdoors as long as they have extra protection. While Common and Comet goldfish are hearty and don’t require warm water, you can move Fantail, Oranda and Lionheads to a pond if you use a heater. A pond-kept goldfish typically lives a few years longer than one in an aquarium (all other things being equal)! The key to shifting goldfish from a tank to a pond is to replicate their water conditions exactly before you move them: Goldfish tanks require frequent maintenance and should be equipped with the best 3-stage filtration systems to keep the ammonia levels down. Spikes of toxic ammonia can poison your fish and lead to stress and ill-health. Goldfish are omnivores and naturally eat a variety of plants and other animals. Fancy goldfish in particular are already predisposed to weight and digestive problems due to the odd shape of their bodies. This can lead to a cascade of health problems and often dramatically shortens the life of a goldfish. You can find details on the best diets, treats and feeding regimens in our Goldfish Care Guide. We’ve already covered the reasons you should never keep your goldfish in a bowl or small aquarium. The ideal aquarium size varies depending on your number and type of goldfish, but for maximum growth and longevity I recommend allowing each fish a minimum of 50-gallons of capacity, and more is better if you have the space. 20 to 30 gallons is an acceptable range for a single fish but is less than ideal if you’re aiming for longevity. Even fancy goldfish often make it into their second decade of life with proper care! Heck, a goldfish won as a prize might well surpass your dog or cat in terms of their lifespan!

TABLE OF CONTENTS

How Long Do Goldfish Live?

The misconception that Goldfish don’t live long is as common as the misconception that they have short memories.These fish are members of the Carp family Cyprinidae, which are known for their long lifespans both in the wild and in captivity. Their close cousin the Common Carp can live up to 20 years.Goldfish are a domesticated variant of wild Carp and they will live longer if they are housed in an outdoor pond setup that closely mimics their natural habitat.If you are keeping them indoors, their tank should be at least 50 gallons.

Common Goldfish

Wild Carp can live up to 10 years, but are more likely to live for 4 or 5 due to the risks of predation, disease, and competition with other fish.In captivity, they can live for 10-14 years in a tank that is at least 50 gallons. Proper tank conditions, room to grow, and a healthy and balanced diet make all the difference.

Fancy Goldfish

Fancy Goldfish are double tailed breeds specially bred for their decorative appearance. These include the Telescope, Fringetail, Bubble Eye, and many others.Their lifespan depends on the breed and their level of care. Some breeds will need more intensive care than others.Heavily modified breeds like the Ranchu and the Bubble Eye may only live up to a maximum of 5 years.Telescopes are bred to live for 12 to 14 years, but it’s possible that they may have problems with vision and coordination.Fringetails and Fantails can live up to 12 years in a tank and 14 years in a pond.

Other Goldfish

5 Ways to Increase Your Goldfish’s Lifespan

Your Goldfish’s lifespan will mainly depend on the amount of care you spend on them.With a good understanding of the type of effort it takes to keep your fish healthy, you can help it reach a ripe old age and enjoy a healthy life.Here are 6 different ways to increase your Goldfish’s lifespan:

Keep Them In A Pond

Although they are one of the most popular fish tank pets, these fish prefer living in a pond.A pond provides more space to swim and allows them to reach their maximum size. Fish that are able to grow their largest are usually the ones that reach an old age.Keeping them in a pond also allows more room for you to replicate the conditions that wild Carp are used to. They will also be exposed to natural light and seasonal variation that affects the fish’s biology and physiology.All breeds benefit from a more natural lifestyle as it lets them use their wild instincts and live the longest possible life.

The Tank-to-Pond Method

If you want your fish to live a long life, but still want to keep them in an indoor aquarium, this method gives you the best of both worlds.When you first purchase your Goldfish, you can start out by raising them in a 50 or 75 gallon indoor tank.Include freshwater plants and keep the water temperatures between 68-74°F.Start preparing an outdoor environment for your fish as they grow larger. The pond conditions should be very similar to the tank conditions in terms of temperature, pH and flow.You can move your fish to their new pond when they reach around 10 inches long.Make sure to acclimate them properly to their new home.

Keep The Habitat Clean

An unclean habitat is one of the main causes of disease and infection in aquarium fish.Goldfish lifespans are often shortened in tanks due to poor tank maintenance or unhygienic conditions.When waste is produced in large amounts in an enclosed space like a tank, things can get dirty really quickly. Goldfish in particular are very messy fish, so they will need their tanks cleaned every 2 week.Never wait until your water clouds up before you clean it. Dirt and grime can build up to dangerous levels long before it begins to show. Water testing kits can test for the nitrogen and ammonia buildup that indicates a dirty tank. You should use these to check your water each time you carry out a water change.These are strictly temperate fish with a tolerance range of 68 to 74°F. In addition to temperature, these fish can be sensitive to drastic changes in pH and dissolved oxygen. They need a pH of 6.8 to 7.6.Also make sure to choose the right filter for your tank. An external or canister filter is better for very large, very messy tanks.

Feed Them The Correct Diet

In the wild Goldfish eat zooplankton, insects and microworms along with aquatic plants and algae. The best diet for your fish is one that meets all of their wild nutritional requirements.Protein and vegetables are the most important part of their diet.Any flakes or pellets that you give them should have a good balance of protein and vegetable content. You can even make homemade protein and veggie mixes for them to try.Live prey is important to activate their prey instinct. In both tanks and ponds, feed them water fleas, brine shrimp, and tubifex worms.

Avoid Overcrowding

Overcrowding can lead to anxiety and behavior problems in fish. A crowded tank can lead to increased aggression or shyness.It also makes it much harder to keep the tank clean.Overstocking a pond leads to poor growth and development. Fish that are underdeveloped will die much younger than fully grown fish.It can be tempting to fill your aquarium with as many fish as you possibly can. However, keeping it in moderation ensures that each one of your aquarium inhabitants can live their best life.

FAQs About How Long Goldfish Live

How Long Can Goldfish Live Without Food?

Usually they can go up to 2 weeks without food – the longest recorded survival is 4 and a half months.When there is little food available, their metabolism will slow down naturally (a lower metabolism means that they won’t need to eat as much). They can regulate their food intake based on temperature, seasonality and other conditions that can make food hard to come by.Like any other animal, they store energy in their bodies for emergency situations. However, if they go for too long without food their bodies will eventually begin to shut down.It’s best not to let your fish go without food for too long. Remember to feed them at least twice a day.

How Long Do Goldfish Live In A Bowl

The sight of a fish in a bowl is a very common one, however a bowl is the worst possible place for it.Goldfish that are sold in bowls are meant to be moved into a large tank or pond.A bowl is too small for them to grow to their maximum length. Stunted, underdeveloped fish will die very young. A fish kept in a bowl will only live for 2 or 3 years.

How Old Is The Oldest Goldfish Fish?

A fish named Tish made the Guinness Book of World Records as the longest living Goldfish. She was born in 1956 and died at 43 years old. Her sibling, Tosh, lived to age 19.Your fish is not likely to live this long, but it just goes to show how much of a difference a good environment will make.With proper care and the right amount of effort, they can live much longer than most would ever expect.

What Is The Maximum Lifespan Of A Goldfish?

How Long Do They Usually Live Instead?

If you’re surprised to find out that Goldfish can live for two decades, you’re not alone. Most people assume that these fish are temporary pets with a short life expectancy.With their wide availability, low cost, and history of being used as prizes at the carnival, there’s a lot of misinformation about how long Goldfish live.While we’d like to say that most Goldfish can reach that 20-year lifespan without any issues, most do not. The vast majority of Goldfish in captivity don’t even get close to the 20-year mark.In fact,

Common Goldfish vs. Fancy Goldfish Lifespan

While Common Goldfish and Fancy Goldfish still belong to the same family, they are very different.And this impacts their lifespan as wellFancy Goldfish species are known for their long flowing fins. Many of them have double fins, which hampers their ability to swim fast like a Common Goldfish.Not only that, but many species have bulkier bodies. Due to so much selective breeding, these fish have developed round bodies that are more prone to disease (like dropsy).In poor living conditions, Fancy Goldfish have a much higher risk of suffering from a disease. For super modified species, such as the Bubble Eye and Ranchu, health issues are very widespread.Those species often only live for about five years.Common Goldfish are bred to live between 12 and 14 years. But that’s only achievable with pristine care.

Ways To Increase Their Lifespan

Just because Goldfish have a reputation for living shorter lives doesn’t mean that you have to treat them as temporary pets. Goldfish are fully capable of living long lives.Like any other captive fish, their lifespan depends on the quality of care that you provide. In optimal living conditions, your Goldfish can thrive for many years to come.Here are some ways that you can help your Goldfish live as long as possible.

1. Don’t Keep Them In A Bowl

The first thing you should do is keep them out of a fishbowl!There’s nothing more iconic than the imagery of a single Goldfish in a glass bowl.For one, a fishbowl doesn’t hold much water. Most will only hold about three gallons. Goldfish need far more space than that. Some types of Goldfish can reach lengths of around 10 inches.When they’re kept in a small bowl, their growth and development are stunted.Plus, the lack of swimming space can cause stress and anxiety. Goldfish need to have open waters to swim. Even those that aren’t powerful swimmers need ample room to roam.Without it, the fish’s stress levels can skyrocket. This opens up a pandora’s box of potential diseases and health problems.The second major issue with fishbowls is the lack of proper filtration. Goldfish are messy creatures that produce a considerable amount of waste.Without the proper filtration that comes with an established tank, ammonia and nitrate levels can increase dramatically. This can lead to ammonia poisoning, even more stress, and premature death.

2. Keep Them In A Tank That’s Large Enough

We know that fishbowls are bad, so how big of a tank does a Goldfish really need? At the very least,A tank that’s 20 gallons or larger provides a number of benefits. For one, your fish will have plenty of room to swim and explore. The extra space can do a lot to keep your Goldfish stimulates and happy.Secondly, larger tanks are easier to maintain water conditions. With even standard filtration equipment, the water is more likely to be well-cycled and highly oxygenated.It’s still possible to have quality issues in a tank. But, larger aquariums have the tools you need to keep things more stable in the long run.

3. Stay On Top Of Water Quality And Parameters

Good water quality is crucial for any fish that’s living in an aquarium. You must be proactive about maintaining the tank and keeping parameters stable.Start by investing in a top-notch filtration system.External hang-on-back filters or basic canister filters are more than capable of keeping the tank cycled. They’ll remove excess waste and keep water moving.While filters do a lot of the work for you, they won’t handle everything.This means performing partial water changes and getting rid of any algae buildup. You shouldn’t wait until the water is looking discolored or cloudy to take action.As we mentioned earlier, Goldfish are messy. If you have a group of them, it won’t take long for waste to accumulate. Scrub the inside of the glass, utilize a gravel vacuum, and remove any leftover food.Test the water regularly to ensure that ammonia and nitrate levels are not detectable.In addition to the cleanliness of the tank, you must pay attention to the water parameters. Conditions can fluctuate multiple times throughout the day.Luckily, Goldfish are hardy enough to tolerate subtle changes. It’s really the major changes that you have to worry about.The water temperature should stay between 68°F and 74°F (these are good cold water fish). pH levels can hover between 6.8 and 7.6.

4. Feed Them A Healthy Diet

Goldfish are omnivores that will eat pretty much anything that you provide. The go-to for inexperienced fish-keepers is cheap flake food. Commercial foods are great, but you need to make sure that your Goldfish is getting all the nutrients and vitamins they need.Stick to a high-quality flake or nutritionally balanced pellet food as the staple of their diet. Then, provide some supplements to kick their diet up a notch.Goldfish do very well when fed high-protein snacks like brine shrimp, water fleas, and tubifex worms. They also enjoy plant-based foods like blanched vegetables.Aim for some variety when feeding the Goldfish. This will improve their overall health and provide them with some enrichment.A good diet can even make them more colorful and vibrant than they were before!

5. Consider Keeping Them In A Pond

The absolute best thing you can do for your Goldfish is to house them in a large pond. Creating a Goldfish pond allows you to closely replicate their natural habitat, which will have a big impact on their lifespan.No matter how hard you try, there’s just no way to perfectly replicate natural light and seasonal variations in an indoor aquarium. With a spacious outdoor pond, you can.Larger ponds hold hundreds or even thousands of gallons of water. Thus, your Goldfish isn’t confined. They have all the space they would ever need!Most Goldfish living in ponds will grow to massive sizes. Instead of staying a measly two or three inches, some species can reach their full potential in a pond.You don’t have to start your Goldfish out in a pond. You can raise them in a standard 20-gallon tank to enjoy their company inside. Once they reach adulthood, you can transition them to the pond where they can live out the rest of their life.

A Short Guide to Goldfish Lifespans

I’ve noticed that many people don’t expect their pet goldfish to be around for very long. Afterall, feeder goldfish are often sold for less than a dollar and given away in school events and at county fairs. Many kids have seen their hard-won prize fish pass away quickly in a fishbowl. So what’s the real-life expectancy of a goldfish?

Average Lifespan of a Goldfish

It’s actually not an easy question to answer, because it depends on a host of factors. There are hundreds of varieties of goldfish in the world, and your fish’s genetics and their early development will set natural limits on their possible lifespan. In general, however, goldfish are the longest-living pet fish and can

Guppy1 to 2 yearsBetta2 to 3 yearsMolly/Platy/Swordtail3 to 5 yearsClown/Weather Loach10 to 15 yearsConvict Cichlid15 to 20 years

Guppy
1 to 2 years
Betta
2 to 3 years
Molly/Platy/Swordtail
3 to 5 years
Clown/Weather Loach
10 to 15 years
Convict Cichlid
15 to 20 years

In a Pond or Large Aquarium

Since goldfish have been domesticated for thousands of years, we can’t really examine their life expectancy under natural conditions in the wild. We know that their close cousin, the common carp, can live for up to 38 years in protected outdoor ponds and streams, though wild fish probably don’t survive much past 5 to 10 years.How long do goldfish live in a pond? Obviously, it depends on their conditions and diet. Assuming they receive high-quality care and are not eaten by a raccoon or other predator, pond goldfish can easily survive for 20 to 40 years depending on their type.Aquarium-kept fish rarely live as long as their pond-raised siblings unless they are kept in very roomy tanks with excellent filtration and top-notched maintenance. My three Common goldfish were 12 years old when I had to sell them as I left town to start college. They had already outlived my golden retriever by 2 years, though!

In a Fishbowl

I’ve never seen a bowl-raised goldfish that survived more than a couple of years, and I’d guess that the vast majority die within weeks. How long can goldfish live in a bowl? Even with diligent care, a goldfish in a bowl simply won’t live very long. Fishbowls are too small for goldfish, even the smaller fancy types.When goldfish are cramped for space they get very stressed. This reduces their immune system and metabolism, which causes them to stop growing and predisposes them to illness. Stress hormones wreak havoc on their bodies, leading to disease and death. Even with the best care, these goldfish have a limited lifespan.

Lifespan of Different Types of Goldfish

Increasing the Life Expectancy of Your Goldfish

You may have noticed that most varieties of goldfish have a fairly wide range when it comes to their life expectancy. Why is there so much variation in their lifespans? It comes down to their habitat conditions and care. The better you accommodate your goldfish and maintain their style of living, the longer you can expect them to survive!

Keep Their Water Clean

The ideal way to keep most types of goldfish is in a freshwater pond. Natural sunlight and seasonal variations go a long way to keeping goldfish healthy, lean and active. They will also naturally feed on insects, eggs and plant materials in your pond in addition to their usual diet.While I wouldn’t recommend trying to keep the very delicate types of goldfish in ponds, other fancies can survive outdoors as long as they have extra protection. While Common and Comet goldfish are hearty and don’t require warm water, you can move Fantail, Oranda and Lionheads to a pond if you use a heater.A pond-kept goldfish typically lives a few years longer than one in an aquarium (all other things being equal)! The key to

Feed a Well-Balanced Diet

Goldfish are omnivores and naturally eat a variety of plants and other animals. While it’s tempting to feed your fish a lot of food and extra treats, this usually leads to overweight, constipated fish. Fancy goldfish in particular are already predisposed to weight and digestive problems due to the odd shape of their bodies.Being overweight can cause issues with their swim bladders as well. While this isn’t directly fatal, it reduces their ability to swim and feed. This can lead to a cascade of health problems and often dramatically shortens the life of a goldfish. You can find details on the best diets, treats and feeding regimens in our Goldfish Care Guide.

Don’t Crowd Your Goldfish

We’ve already covered the reasons you should never keep your goldfish in a bowl or small aquarium. Cramped goldfish are stressed goldfish. They may act aggressively with each, which often leads to injuries and infections. Medicating sick fish is also stressful, since the meds are toxic even if your fish tolerates the correct dose.The ideal aquarium size varies depending on your number and type of goldfish, but for maximum growth and longevity I recommend allowing each fish a minimum of 50-gallons of capacity, and more is better if you have the space. 20 to 30 gallons is an acceptable range for a single fish but is less than ideal if you’re aiming for longevity.

Frances Dickson
What a beautiful day in history. A few thousand years ago, a chicken dressed as a rabbit layed the first ever Cadbury Egg. I think if I'm going to do a science fiction. General student. Friendly alcohol fan. Social media maven. Bacon fanatic. Passionate zombieaholic. Certified twitter practitioner. Interests: Birdwatching, Mosaic Art, Painting and Drawing
Posts created 393

Related Posts

Begin typing your search term above and press enter to search. Press ESC to cancel.

Back To Top