How Big Do Corn Snakes Get?

The corn snake is a mouse hunter commonly found in cornfields, hence their name. These snakes are generally low-key and easy to care for. They are not vicious, and they are never a threat to humans, which makes them awesome pets for households of all types. Corn snakes come in a wide variety of different colors and patterns, making them favorites of snake collectors and enthusiasts. The southern United States is where these snakes originated from, but they can be found living in captivity all around the world today. Lets take a look at how big corn snakes can get.

Image Credit: Frauke Feind, Pixabay In the wild, corn snakes eat mice. There are a couple of factors that could affect the rate and quality of growth that a corn snake experiences as they age.

A tank that is too large while they are babies can make them feel afraid and regress to hiding spaces, where they do not spend much time stretching and moving. Image Credit: Frauke Feind, Pixabay All snakes maintain their body temperature by obtaining heat from their environment. A lack of nutrition can negatively affect the growth rate of the snake if temperatures stay too low for too long.

A heat lamp that helps keep the habitat stable temperature-wise will allow a corn snake to consistently maintain their body temperature. If they are fed other sources of food instead of mice as their main staple, chances are that they will not grow as expected throughout their life. Making sure that mice are the main staple of this snakes diet will help ensure optimal growth and health.

Oliver (Ollie) Jones A zoologist and freelance writer living in South Australia with his partner Alex, their dog Pepper, and their cat Steve (who declined to be pictured). Ollie, originally from the USA, holds his masters degree in wildlife biology and moved to Australia to pursue his career and passion but has found a new love for working online and writing about animals of all types.

How big do pet corn snakes get?

Corn snakes hatch at 8 to 12 inches long, and most eventually reach 4 to 5.5 feet in length.

Do corn snakes like to be held?

Corn snake handling should occur least 1-2x weekly, but no more than once daily. Snakes do not require social interaction for their mental health, but handling helps the snake stay tame and can be a good opportunity for exercise as well.

How long does it take for a corn snake to reach full size?

Adult corn snakes can range in length from 3.5 to 5 feet. When they hatch, neonate corn snakes will measure between 8 and 12 inches. It takes approximately three years for corn snakes to reach their adult length and sexual maturity.

If youre thinking that corn snakes are snakes made of corn, well give you points for imagination, but unfortunately, you are wrong. A corn snake is, in fact, a relatively small and harmless North American snake that gets its name from the corn-like pattern on its skin.

When you’re ready to choose your corn snake, look for one with no cuts or abrasions, and with bright, alert eyes and a flicking tongue . Corn snakes need to be kept in a temperature of 75 to 85 degrees Fahrenheit, which is pretty easy to achieve with a warming lamp set over the tank.

Heat rocks, meanwhile, are generally not recommended because snakes have sensitive skin that is prone to burns. To keep your corn snake happy and stress free, its a great idea to fill the tank with plants, branches for curling around on, and boxes to hide in.

Corn snakes are some of the least imposing snakes because of their size. The snakes of your nightmares are usually giant anacondas not small corn snakes that you keep as a pet.

This 8-14 inch baby will grow steadily throughout a 2 year period (approximately) until it reaches its full size. These snakes were chosen because they would willingly eat the mice they gave them, so it was clear that they could control their food intake.

)164.3As you can see, the corn snakes in this study started out at approximately a foot in length and grew to 3 feet over the course of a year! We generally dont like to hear the word captivity in most contexts, but in the snake world, this just means that they were not born and raised in the wild. Its true that size may vary depending on whether you are looking at a wild corn snake or a captive bred one.

Captive bred snakes tend to be a tiny bit smaller than their wild cousins. If you are nervous about your corn snake not having enough wiggle room and resenting you later in life, then it is fine to allow them a bigger cage. Apart from the basic size of tank that you put your corn snake in to live, you will need to think about how to keep it healthy once its in there.

Its important to make sure the humidity doesnt get too extreme, though, because then you run the risk of deteriorating scale rot for your snake. If you maintain the correct temperatures and humidity for your corn snake, then it will be able to grow without any problems. For hatchlings, you will want to get very small baby mice and increase the size of the food as your snake gets bigger.

This is popular because your corn snake will get the same amount of nutrients without the trouble (and sometimes danger) of catching live prey. It is documented that corn snakes will continue reproducing until they hit the ages ranging from 10-12 years old.

Most corn snakes for sale in the UK are bred in captivity. However, it’s still important that the environment you keep your pet corn snake in mimics the wild as much as possible. Here’s what to keep in mind if you’re thinking of keeping a corn snake as a pet.

If you’re interested in buying or adopting a corn snake, make sure you’re ready to provide the care theyll need for their entire life. Mice should be your corn snake’s most common food, but you can feed them other prey, such as suitably sized quails or rats.

Make sure prey is thoroughly defrosted and the width is no greater than 1.5 times the widest part of the snake’s body. When threatened , corn snakes may pull their head back, displaying an ‘S’ shaped neck.

Facts About Corn Snakes

Corn snakes are also sometimes referred to as red rat snakes, as they are closely related to rat snakes, which are larger than them. Usually docile, the corn snake is easy for even children to handle. However, they shake their tails and make a rattling noise when they are feeling threatened. These snakes are known for being excellent escape artists and will spend much of their time trying to figure out how to get out of their habitat if they are feeling bored or boxed in.Therefore, corn snakes need plenty of space to sprawl out and explore inside their habitats. The size of their habitat may have to change as time goes on, based on their growth. They love having dark places to hide during the day, as they are most active at dawn and dusk. A heat lamp should be utilized to keep the snake’s habitat warmed to about 85 degrees during the day and 75 degrees at night. Corn snakes tend to like it nice and humid too.

Ideal Diet for Optimal Growth

In the wild, corn snakes eat mice. Therefore, this should be their main staple for optimal growth while living in captivity. Corn snakes should be fed about once a week. If a corn snake will not eat their offerings right away, the food should be taken away and offered again the next day until it does get eaten. Adults snakes can eat up to three mice in one sitting. Both live and dead mice can be offered at mealtime. Frozen mice should be completely defrosted before serving.Dead mice can be held by the tails using tongs so the snake can “strike” their prey, like in the wild. In addition to mice, corn snakes can eat quail eggs as snacks. They can also occasionally eat rats and other small rodents in exchange for mice. But mice should always be their primary source of calories.

What Other Factors Affect Corn Snake Growth?

There are a couple of factors that could affect the rate and quality of growth that a corn snake experiences as they age. Here is what you need to know.The size of a corn snake’s tank can affect their growth as time goes on. A tank that is too large while they are babies can make them feel afraid and regress to hiding spaces, where they do not spend much time stretching and moving. A lack of movement and stretching can stunt a snake’s growth. A tank that is too small can also stunt their growth. Therefore, baby corn snakes should live in a 5-gallon tank. Once they become adults, they should live in a 20-gallon tank. A 10-gallon tank can be used for the middle stage.All snakes maintain their body temperature by obtaining heat from their environment. Improper temperatures that make it hard for a corn snake to maintain their body temperature may grow slowly because so much of their energy is being used to maintain their body temperature.Also, if a snake is too cold, they will not eat because they need heat to digest their food. A lack of nutrition can negatively affect the growth rate of the snake if temperatures stay too low for too long. A heat lamp that helps keep the habitat stable temperature-wise will allow a corn snake to consistently maintain their body temperature.Corn snakes predominantly eat mice. If they are fed other sources of food instead of mice as their main staple, chances are that they will not grow as expected throughout their life. Making sure that mice are the main staple of this snake’s diet will help ensure optimal growth and health.

Are Corn Snakes Venomous When Fully Grown?

Corn snakes are not venomous, but they do pack a punch when it comes to biting. Their striking range is about half of their body length, which can be quite far. While their bite does hurt, the injury tends to heal itself within a few days without the need for medical assistance.These snakes tend to bite when they feel threatened or cornered. They should be handled from a young age to reduce stress when being handled as adults. Regular handling will reduce the risk of bite injuries among friends and family who are just getting to know the snake.

Snake Bytes: Corn Snake Care

If you’re thinking that corn snakes are snakes made of corn, we’ll give you points for imagination, but unfortunately, you are wrong. A corn snake is, in fact, a relatively small and harmless North American snake that gets its name from the corn-like pattern on its skin.Corn snakes make great first pets for a responsible kid that has a keen interest in snakes, but it is still important to do thorough research before getting the snake to make sure it is a good fit and that you’re up for the commitment

Choosing Your New Pet

When you’re ready to choose your corn snake, look for one with no cuts or abrasions, and with bright, alert eyes and a flicking tongue. These are all signs of a healthy snake.Now, on to the nitty-gritty: caring for a corn snake.

Corn Snake Tanks

Remember that reptiles, like other creatures, will grow to their proper size, regardless of whether you have a big or small space for them. As no one (particularly your snake) enjoys cramped quarters, a roomy home is of utmost importance. A 30- to 40-gallon tank should be large enough for your corn snake to move and grow in.As with any snake tank, however, you’ll need to have a secured top to prevent any great escapes by your snake. A mesh lid is probably best, so that the tank will have appropriate ventilation. Corn snakes need to be kept in a temperature of 75 to 85 degrees Fahrenheit, which is pretty easy to achieve with a warming lamp set over the tank. The tank should have a “warm” zone (82 degrees) and a cool zone, with a hiding area available in each zone. Your local pet shop will have a selection to choose from. Heat rocks, meanwhile, are generally not recommended because snakes have sensitive skin that is prone to burns. Do not use reptile sand as bedding on the bottom of the tank, it can get into their nostrils and cause congestion. Pine bedding is not recommended either, as the oils can be toxic to corn snake.To keep your corn snake happy and stress free, it’s a great idea to fill the tank with plants, branches for curling around on, and boxes to hide in. Snakes can get traumatized when they have no place to hide, so give your snake both room to move and accessories to feel secure. Just make sure not to use live plants, as the fertilizer in the soil can be harmful to the snake. Use rocks and treated wood available in pet stores.

What Do Corn Snakes Eat?

Corn snakes primarily eat rodents. They are constrictor snakes, meaning that they catch thier prey and squeeze it. Even if you are feeding your snake dead rodents, you may want to give your snake the feeling that it is catching its own food. When it comes to mealtime, defrost the (dead) mouse and let it warm to room temperature. Offer it to the snake by holding it by the tail (feeding forceps are a really good idea) and dangle the mouse in front of the snake so it can strike the mouse, grab it, and go to work at swallowing its meal.Quail eggs make great treats for your snake, but only occasionally — about one every few weeks. Keep in mind that in the wild, eggs are an uncommon treat, not part of a regular diet. Fresh, clean water should always be available. This is essential.

Preventing Illness

To avoid bacteria and fungus from accumulating in the tank, make sure to clean the tank regularly, removing feces and urine as soon as possible. Snakes shed their old skin as they grow, and this is an amazing process to observe, since they shed their entire skin, slipping out of it like an old stocking.When the time comes for your corn snake to shed, you will notice that its eyes will turn milky blue a few days before, its skin will go dull and it will take on a whitish sheen. When its eyes clear again, the snake is ready to shed. You can give your snake a shallow dish of tepid water to soak itself in as it goes through the shedding process.Corn snakes, like other creatures, are susceptible to parasites and illnesses — many of which are deadly. Because of this, have your snake tested for parasites when you first purchase the animal. If your snake is listless or sick, take any vomit or feces along to the veterinarian for testing.

Final Corn Snake Care Tips

So now you have a few facts under your belt. But consider this before you bring a snake home: make sure that no one in your home is very afraid of snakes (ophidiophobia), and think very carefully before bringing a snake into a home with small children, as toddlers don’t have the maturity to remember rules about not opening tanks, and they have not yet learned how to be gentle with small creatures.

How Big Do Corn Snakes Get?

How big do corn snakes get, and how long does it take for them to grow?Corn snakes are very popular in the pet snake community because of their beautiful colors and manageable sizes. However, there is much more to this species’ size than meets the eye.It’s important to know how to feed, house, and care for your corn snake to allow it the health and room to grow!

Corn Snake Lengths and Sizes

The corn snake is a terrific choice as a pet. Their temperaments are pretty docile, and they are easy to take care of! Another pleasant fact, that corn snake owners find to be true, is that corn snakes don’t grow to unmanageable sizes.An average corn snake will rarely exceed 5 feet long; whereas, a lot will vary in lengths between 2 and 5 feet. This means that your corn snake may end up being shorter than you anticipated, which isn’t a bad thing! We love all of our snakes equally here!The size is a breath of fresh air for beginning snake owners, but the beautiful array of colors that you can find corn snakes in is appealing to even the most experienced care givers.When corn snakes are first hatched, they will only be a few inches long. This 8-14 inch baby will grow steadily throughout a 2 year period (approximately) until it reaches its full size.In a journal article written by S. M. Barnard, T. G. Hollinger, and T. A. Romaine, published by the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists (ASIH), a study of corn snakes and their size and eating habits was conducted.This experiment took place in the 1970’s but the lengths are still relevant. These men took 10 baby corn snakes, measured them at birth, and then measured them twice more throughout their lives.These snakes were chosen because they would willingly eat the mice they gave them, so it was clear that they could control their food intake.Here are the results of that study:As you can see, the corn snakes in this study started out at approximately a foot in length and grew to 3 feet over the course of a year!The data ends there, so we don’t know what they were like after 2 years, but you can really see the development even in the first year of life!

How Captivity Affects Size

We generally don’t like to hear the word “captivity” in most contexts, but in the snake world, this just means that they were not born and raised in the wild.It’s true that size may vary depending on whether you are looking at a wild corn snake or a captive bred one. Captive bred snakes tend to be a tiny bit smaller than their wild cousins. This has some to do with balanced diets and the confines of their homes.Don’t worry too much about the little details of this because the size change is not significant enough for worry.Something youIt is suggested that a full-grown corn snake be kept in a 20-gallon tankWe don’t want a 50-gallon tank cluttering up your home if it is unnecessary, but you do what is best for your snake. The only advice I can give, and I will repeat it, is to not put your snake in a tank that is obviously too small.

Other Housing Requirements That Affect Your Snake

Apart from the basic size of tank that you put your corn snake in to live, you will need to think about how to keep it healthy once it’s in there. There are the basics such as food and water that are very important which I discuss in the next section.The temperature and humidity levels in your snake’s tank will affectThese two factors will help your snake stay healthy and allow it to have an easy time shedding. It’s important to make sure the humidity doesn’t get too extreme, though, because then you run the risk of deteriorating scale rot for your snake.Scale rot is very dangerous. Check out this article for everything you need to know about scale rot in snakes.If you maintain the correct temperatures and humidity for your corn snake, then it will be able to grow without any problems.

Life Span of a Corn Snake

If we break down all life to its simplest form (now I’m not talking atoms and cells) then all we need for life is food, water, and sunshine. We’re all just plants with more complicated social lives.What I’m trying to get at is that a snake’s diet and care can really affect their growth if it’s not regulated or done right.Corn snakes can happily live on a diet of mice. For hatchlings, you will want to get very small baby mice and increase the size of the food as your snake gets bigger.It has become increasingly popular among snake owners to use thawed frozen mice as the chosen food for their corn snake. This is popular because your corn snake will get the same amount of nutrients without the trouble (and sometimes danger) of catching live prey.This will be easy for a snake bred in captivity because they didn’t even have the need to chase down and hunt their food. This also makes life easier on you and saves you any trauma from buying and offering live mice to your snake-like a blood sacrifice.You just need to find the right method for you and your corn snake.[hurrytimer id=”11278″]

What do corn snakes eat?

Mice should be your corn snake’s most common food, but you can feed them other prey, such as suitably sized quails or rats. Make sure prey is thoroughly defrosted and the width is no greater than 1.5 times the widest part of the snake’s body.