How Big Do Cocker Spaniels Get?

Cocker spaniels are loving, easy-going, and affectionate-a treat to have as part of the family. They are generally smart and easy to train. Thanks to their relatively small size-they grow to about 14-15 inches tall and weigh no more than 30 pounds-they are also ideal for any size home, from apartment to single-family house.

patterns bicolor tricolor black and tan sable flecked / ticked / speckled merle other traits easy to train requires lots of grooming prone to health issues high prey drive high potential for weight gain loves water apartment-friendly cold weather tolerant strong loyalty tendencies

While they were originally bred as hunting dogs , they now make ideal companions for pet owners young and old. Cocker spaniels have thick, soft, wavy coats of many colors-black, light cream, red, white, and brown-and patterns, all with long, lush ears that people can’t resist petting. Originally bred to hunt woodcock, cocker spaniels still love time spent outside.

Cocker spaniels are a beautiful dog with a very nice size, big enough to be sturdy and able to play with kids , but small enough to be an apartment or condo dog ,” says Ryan Steen, DVM, medical director at Frey Pet Hospital in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. As long as your cocker spaniel is raised with kids that are kind and respectful to animals, it’s a match made in heaven. While your cocker spaniel will certainly like to snuggle up on your lap, you’ll need to make sure she gets plenty of exercise , too, thanks to her hunting heritage.

While cocker spaniel puppies will be worn out on a short walk, adult cocker spaniels will need 30 minutes of walking twice a day with additional free time to play-they especially enjoy a good game of fetch. For a style that requires little maintenance, ask the groomer to trim your cocker spaniel’s hair the same length all over, called a “puppy cut.” Their trademark floppy ears are usually kept with longer hair no matter the style and need to be monitored for mats.

Use deep, narrow bowls for food and water , or consider using a snood to protect her ears when your cocker spaniel eats. They are a versatile breed and can be trained for agility courses as well-cocker spaniels are skilled at paying attention and following commands . You’ll spend considerable time on potty training as cocker spaniels are notorious for marking their spot indoors when excited or nervous.

Cockers are sensitive and don’t respond well to harsh treatment, so be kind and gentle to bring out the best in their personality. Generally a healthy breed -typically living about 12-15 years-there are a few common conditions cocker spaniel owners should be aware of. ” Allergies and chronic ear infections are some of the most common ailments I see in cocker spaniels,” Steen says.

Their diet may be to blame, with common allergies to beef, chicken, corn, wheat, soy, milk, and eggs. They will overeat and use their big, brown eyes to convince you they need a second helping at feeding time. As they get older, cocker spaniels are prone to heart, liver, or kidney failure , as well as cancer .

Cocker spaniels are also sometimes affected by epilepsy , progressive retinal atrophy (which causes blindness ), and cataracts (which requires expensive surgical correction). Cocker spaniel popularity in the U.S. significantly increased when the breed was featured in Disney’s Lady and the Tramp in 1955. Named for their excellence in field hunting the woodcock, they were recognized as an official breed in England in 1892.

Cocker spaniels quickly became popular dogs both with pet owners and breeders, and they did particularly well in the show ring. Cocker spaniel popularity in the U.S. significantly increased when the breed was featured in Disney’s Lady and the Tramp in 1955. Media mogul Oprah Winfrey owns two cocker spaniels , Sophie and Solomon.

Breeding a cocker spaniel with a poodle produces the intelligent, loving cockapoo .

How big is a full size cocker spaniel?

Cocker spaniels are moderately sized, beautiful dogs. Male pups stand 15 inches tall, and female dogs grow to 14 inches tall. They should not weigh more than 30 pounds-and will need your help in not overeating.

Is a Cocker Spaniel a small or medium dog?

Cocker Spaniel (English) English Cocker Spaniels are medium-sized, well-balanced dogs. Their coats are flat and silky with plenty of feathering on the front legs.

What is the average size of a cocker spaniel?

English Cocker Spaniel / Height

Do cocker spaniels bark a lot?

Cocker Spaniels can be high strung, vocal dogs, so your Cocker Spaniel is particularly prone to develop a habit of barking at delivery people. The reason this behavior can be difficult to eradicate is that the behavior is self-rewarding.

Finding a good breeder is the key to finding the right puppy. A good breeder will match you with the right puppy, and will without question have done all the health certifications necessary to screen out health problems as much as is possible. He or she is more interested in placing pups in the right homes than in making big bucks.

Beautiful, sweet-natured and moderately sized, the Cockers popularity bounded happily forward after World War II with the two-time Westminster Best in Show winner Ch. Weighing less than 30 pounds (albeit with a tendency to gain more) with a soft, wavy coat in many colors and patterns, long ears and the most expressive eyes in dogdom, the Cocker is an excellent family pet — lively, affectionate, sweet and trainable.

A well-bred Cocker should be easy to housetrain, happy to be with you, and eager to experience new things even if it means walking on a leash, riding in the car or going to puppy classes. The immense popularity fueled a rise in poor breeding that resulted in some bad temperaments, but Cocker breeders have worked hard to correct the situation. Before individual Cockers can be included in the Canine Health Information Center (CHIC) database, the ASC requires them to have a clearance from the Canine Eye Registry Foundation or a board-certified veterinary ophthalmologist (to check for cataracts, glaucoma, and progressive retinal atrophy); hip evaluations from the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals or PennHIP ; a thyroid profile; and a profile for blood factor X and von Willebrands disease.

You should also bear in mind that buying a puppy from websites that offer to ship your dog to you immediately can be a risky venture, as it leaves you no recourse if what you get isnt exactly what you expected. The cost of a Cocker puppy varies depending on where the breeder lives, whether he is male or female, what titles his parents have, and whether he is best suited for the show ring or a pet home.

As a pet or working dog a Cocker spaniel makes an ideal choice. Being of medium sized Cocker spaniels generally come in two types show Cockers or working Cockers.

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The Cocker Spaniel is primarily a beloved companion dog breed, though they remain a capable bird dog at heart. Beautiful to look atand labor-intensive to groomthe Cockers amenable, cheerful disposition also makes them a treat to have in the family.

Breed isn’t the only factor that goes into affection levels; dogs who were raised inside a home with people around feel more comfortable with humans and bond more easily. Mouthy dogs are more likely to use their mouths to hold or “herd” their human family members, and they need training to learn that it’s fine to gnaw on chew toys, but not on people.

Mouthy breeds tend to really enjoy a game of fetch, as well as a good chew on a toy that’s been stuffed with kibble and treats. These breeds generally aren’t a good fit for homes with smaller pets that can look like prey, such as cats, hamsters, or small dogs. Nordic dogs such as Siberian Huskies were bred to range long distances, and given the chance, they’ll take off after anything that catches their interest.

Originally bred to perform a canine job of some sort, such as retrieving game for hunters or herding livestock, they have the stamina to put in a full workday. They need a significant amount of exercise and mental stimulation, and they’re more likely to spend time jumping, playing, and investigating any new sights and smells. When picking a breed, consider your own activity level and lifestyle, and think about whether you’ll find a frisky, energetic dog invigorating or annoying.

These dynamos need lots of training to learn good manners, and may not be the best fit for a home with young kids or someone who’s elderly or frail. He is primarily a companion but is easily trained for the conformation show ring, obedience and agility competitions, and field work. However, a number of Spaniel fanciers noticed the different strains of Cocker and sought to preserve separate breeds and discourage the interbreeding of the English and American varieties.

The typical Cocker Spaniel is gentle, a loving and trustworthy family companion who is good with children, other pets, and the elderly. It’s important to remember that seizures can be caused by many other things than idiopathic epilepsy, such as metabolic disorders, infectious diseases that affect the brain, tumors, exposure to poisons, severe head injuries, and more. Like most dogs, the Cocker is better behaved when active than when he’s allowed to get bored, which can lead to such behavior problems as barking, digging, and chewing.

Most owners opt to have a professional groomer bathe, brush, and trim their dogs’ coats every six to eight weeks, and prices are high for this time-intensive breed. Given his sensitive personality, an early introduction is advisable so that he learns to accept the handling, brushing, noise of electric clippers, scissoring, ear cleaning, and all the rest of the tasks involved in keeping him looking good.

Cocker Spaniel

Cocker spaniels are loving, easy-going, and affectionate-a treat to have as part of the family. They are generally smart and easy to train. Thanks to their relatively small size-they grow to about 14-15 inches tall and weigh no more than 30 pounds-they are also ideal for any size home, from apartment to single-family house.Very loyal pets, they’ll follow you from room to room all day long. Cockers also love going on brisk walks and seem to frolic everywhere they go. While they were originally bred as hunting dogs, they now make ideal companions for pet owners young and old.

Appearance

Cocker spaniels are moderately sized, beautiful dogs. Male pups stand 15 inches tall, and female dogs grow to 14 inches tall. They should not weigh more than 30 pounds-and will need your help in not overeating.Cocker spaniels have thick, soft, wavy coats of many colors-black, light cream, red, white, and brown-and patterns, all with long, lush ears that people can’t resist petting. The term “sweet puppy dog eyes” was likely inspired by cocker spaniels with their big, dreamy, pleading brown eyes. But their looks require constant attention, both at home and with visits to the groomer.The cocker spaniel, also called the American cocker spaniel, is a distinctly different breed than the English cocker spaniel. Though both breeds have similar heritage, there are subtle differences: the cocker spaniel is longer than she is tall, whereas an English cocker spaniel is taller than she is long. The cocker spaniel also has a shorter muzzle than her English cousins, and her eyes are more almond-shaped.

Temperament

The cocker spaniel is a merry breed. They are also smart and trusting of their owners. While they do have a hunting instinct, they are happiest being a companion at home.They are up for whatever their owner wants to do, as they are happiest pleasing their human family. Care to snuggle up on the couch? A cocker spaniel is in. Kids want to run around in the yard? They are up for that, too. And while reserved initially, cocker spaniels make fast friends with most everyone they meet.They have a sweet temperament and can be very affectionate and cuddly dogs. And with proper training, they also get along well with other pets, including cats. But thanks to their hunting instincts, sharing a home with a pet bird is not typically an option.

Living Needs

Cocker spaniels are a beautiful dog with a very nice size, big enough to be sturdy and able to play with kids, but small enough to be an apartment or condo dog,” says Ryan Steen, DVM, medical director at Frey Pet Hospital in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. As long as your cocker spaniel is raised with kids that are kind and respectful to animals, it’s a match made in heaven.People-oriented by nature, your cocker spaniel will prefer to be with you as much as possible. They enjoy being part of the family and truly thrive when they can be a part of all family activities. They do not do well when left alone and can turn to barking, crying, and other undesirable behaviors when anxious. If left outdoors, they will dig or bark to keep themselves busy.While your cocker spaniel will certainly like to snuggle up on your lap, you’ll need to make sure she gets plenty of exercise, too, thanks to her hunting heritage. While cocker spaniel puppies will be worn out on a short walk, adult cocker spaniels will need 30 minutes of walking twice a day with additional free time to play-they especially enjoy a good game of fetch. This exercise not only helps manage weight-cocker spaniels aren’t one to turn down a snack-but also keeps your pup from getting grouchy.

Care

If you adopt a cocker spaniel, be aware that consistent grooming will be necessary, Steen says. Regular haircuts keep them looking their best and prevent their hair from matting.For a style that requires little maintenance, ask the groomer to trim your cocker spaniel’s hair the same length all over, called a “puppy cut.” Their trademark floppy ears are usually kept with longer hair no matter the style and need to be monitored for mats. Introduce your cocker spaniel to grooming early, because early introduction can make for more successful groomer visits. Be prepared to make regular grooming appointments-about every six to eight weeks-which can be an investment.Between haircuts, plan to do plenty of brushing. Invest in a metal, professional-quality dog comb with fine and medium spacing for the teeth. If you encounter a tangle while brushing, pick through it gently. Regular baths-where you use a high-quality dog shampoo that you rinse thoroughly-are also essential. Nails should be trimmed regularly and you should wipe out their ears once a week to avoid infections.Take steps to make sure their ears don’t get soaked every time they go for a drink of water. Use deep, narrow bowls for food and water, or consider using a snood to protect her ears when your cocker spaniel eats.Cocker spaniels make great therapy dogs, as they are gentle and very loving. They are a versatile breed and can be trained for agility courses as well-cocker spaniels are skilled at paying attention and following commands.Training will require patience and repetition. Make sure to address barking early on. You’ll spend considerable time on potty training as cocker spaniels are notorious for marking their spot indoors when excited or nervous. Lots of positive reinforcement over time will do the trick. Cockers are sensitive and don’t respond well to harsh treatment, so be kind and gentle to bring out the best in their personality.

Health

Generally a healthy breed-typically living about 12-15 years-there are a few common conditions cocker spaniel owners should be aware of.”Allergies and chronic ear infections are some of the most common ailments I see in cocker spaniels,” Steen says. Their diet may be to blame, with common allergies to beef, chicken, corn, wheat, soy, milk, and eggs. Check with your veterinarian for suggestions on changes to their diet.And ensure you aren’t overfeeding your pooch. They will overeat and use their big, brown eyes to convince you they need a second helping at feeding time. But an overweight cocker is an unhealthy cocker.As they get older, cocker spaniels are prone to heart, liver, or kidney failure, as well as cancer. Cocker spaniels are also sometimes affected by epilepsy, progressive retinal atrophy (which causes blindness), and cataracts (which requires expensive surgical correction).

History

The cocker spaniel originated in Spain and has been mentioned as far back as the 14th century. By the 1800s, they were divided into two groups: toys (for companionship) and hunting dogs. Named for their excellence in field hunting the woodcock, they were recognized as an official breed in England in 1892. Cocker spaniels are thought to have been brought to North America with the pilgrims. In fact, the American Spaniel Club was created in 1881 and is the oldest breed club in America.Cocker spaniels quickly became popular dogs both with pet owners and breeders, and they did particularly well in the show ring. In 1921, a cocker spaniel took home Westminster Kennel Club’s Best in Show for the first time. In 1946, the American Kennel Club recognized the American cocker spaniel and the English cocker spaniel as two distinct breeds.

Finding a Cocker Spaniel

Whether you want to go with a breeder or get your dog from a shelter or rescue, here are some things to keep in mind.

Choosing a Cocker Spaniel Breeder

Finding a good breeder is the key to finding the right puppy. A good breeder will match you with the right puppy, and will without question have done all the health certifications necessary to screen out health problems as much as is possible. He or she is more interested in placing pups in the right homes than in making big bucks.
Good breeders will welcome your questions about temperament, health clearances and what the dogs are like to live with and come right back at you with questions of their own about what you’re looking for in a dog and what kind of life you can provide for him. A good breeder can tell you about the history of the breed, explain why one puppy is considered pet quality while another is not, and discuss what health problems affect the breed and the steps she takes take to avoid those problems.
Find a breeder who is a member in good standing of The American Spaniel Club, Inc. and who has agreed to abide by its code of ethics, which prohibits selling dogs to or through pet stores. Your Cocker breeder should want to be a resource in helping you train and care for your new dog.
Avoid breeders who only seem interested in how quickly they can unload a puppy on you and whether your credit card will go through. You should also bear in mind that buying a puppy from websites that offer to ship your dog to you immediately can be a risky venture, as it leaves you no recourse if what you get isn’t exactly what you expected. Put at least as much effort into researching your puppy as you would into choosing a new car or expensive appliance. It will save you money in the long run.
Many reputable breeders have websites, so how can you tell who’s good and who’s not? Red flags include puppies always being available, multiple litters on the premises, having your choice of any puppy, and the ability to pay online with a credit card. Those things are convenient, but they are almost never associated with reputable breeders.
Whether you’re planning to get your new best friend from a breeder, a pet store, or another source, don’t forget that old adage “let the buyer beware”. Disreputable breeders and facilities that deal with puppy mills can be hard to distinguish from reliable operations. There’s no 100% guaranteed way to make sure you’ll never purchase a sick puppy, but researching the breed (so you know what to expect), checking out the facility (to identify unhealthy conditions or sick animals), and asking the right questions can reduce the chances of heading into a disastrous situation. And don’t forget to ask your veterinarian, who can often refer you to a reputable breeder, breed rescue organization, or other reliable source for healthy puppies.
The cost of a Cocker puppy varies depending on where the breeder lives, whether he is male or female, what titles his parents have, and whether he is best suited for the show ring or a pet home. Expect to pay between $300 and $1,000 for a puppy. The puppy you buy should have been raised in a clean home environment, from parents with health clearances and conformation (show) and, ideally, working titles to prove that they are good specimens of the breed.Puppies should be temperament tested, vetted, dewormed, and socialized to give them a healthy, confidentstart in life.
Before you decide to buy a puppy, consider whether an adult Cocker Spaniel might better suit your needs and lifestyle. Puppies are loads of fun, but they require a lot of time and effort before they grow up to become the dog of your dreams. An adult Cocker may already have some training and will probably be less active, destructive and demanding than a puppy. With an adult, you know more about what you’re getting in terms of personality and health and you can find adults through breeders or shelters. If you are interested in acquiring an older dog through breeders, ask them about purchasing a retired show dog or if they know of an adult dog who needs a new home. If you want to adopt a dog, read the advice below on how to do that.

Are working Cockers bigger than show Cockers?

Not normally. Show Cockers are bred for appearance and for conformity to ‘breed standards’ and are generally larger than working dogs.If you compare a fully grown show Cocker and aShow spaniels ( of all breeds ) are normally taller than working spaniels and have much more exaggerated features, such as long ears, longer snouts and much longer hair. Working spaniels, which includes Cockers, by contrast are more compact, smaller and often powerful than their counterparts.

Cocker Spaniel

The Cocker Spaniel is primarily a beloved companion dog breed, though they remain a capable bird dog at heart. Beautiful to look at–and labor-intensive to groom–the Cocker’s amenable, cheerful disposition also makes them a treat to have in the family.Never more pleased than when they’re pleasing you, they’re as happy to snuggle on the couch with their favorite adults as to romp in the yard with the kids. Apartment or large home with a back yard, the Cocker is a highly trainable and adaptable addition to the family. Read on to find out if this is the breed for you!DogTime recommendsSee all dog breed traits and facts about Cocker Spaniels below!