Hemp Oil Side Effects?

Social Anxiety Disorder Coping The Potential Side Effects of CBD CBD: Benefits and Side Effects By Wendy Rose Gould Wendy Rose Gould LinkedIn Wendy Rose Gould is a lifestyle reporter with over a decade of experience covering health and wellness topics. Learn about our editorial process Updated on November 08, 2021 Medically reviewed Verywell Mind articles are reviewed by board-certified physicians and mental healthcare professionals. Medical Reviewers confirm the content is thorough and accurate, reflecting the latest evidence-based research. Content is reviewed before publication and upon substantial updates. Learn more. by Steven Gans, MD Medically reviewed by Steven Gans, MD Steven Gans, MD is board-certified in psychiatry and is an active supervisor, teacher, and mentor at Massachusetts General Hospital. Learn about our Medical Review Board Fact checked Verywell Mind content is rigorously reviewed by a team of qualified and experienced fact checkers. Fact checkers review articles for factual accuracy, relevance, and timeliness. We rely on the most current and reputable sources, which are cited in the text and listed at the bottom of each article. Content is fact checked after it has been edited and before publication. Learn more. by Karen Cilli Fact checked by Karen Cilli Karen Cilli is a fact-checker for Verywell Mind. She has an extensive background in research, with 33 years of experience as a reference librarian and educator. Learn about our editorial process Print Generally speaking, CBD is considered a safe substance when applied topically or taken orally. There are, however, some potential side effects to keep in mind when using this substance, the majority of which are mild. Common Side Effects of CBD The most comment side effects of CBD include drowsiness, gastrointestinal issues, dry mouth, reduced appetite, nausea, and interaction with other medications. Those are outlined in detail below. Drowsiness Some common side effects when using CBD include drowsiness and sedation. This is also considered a benefit, but Dr. Jas Matharu-Daley, a physician and chief medical officer for a CBD brand, notes that the effects might be too strong if youre also taking CBD with other sedating medications. Gastrointestinal Issues Some people may get diarrhea or liver problems [when using CBD]. This is dependent on the individual and their medical history, so monitoring is important, says Dr. Matharu-Daley. Dry Mouth Also known as cotton mouth, CBD can potentially cause your mouth and eyes to feel very dry. Though this side effect is more likely to occur with THC, it can happen with CBD as well. Can Interact With Other Medications CBD might interfere with the other medications you take. Dr. Matharu-Daley says its important to talk to your doctor about whether CBD could affect your existing prescriptions. Nausea In some cases, those who ingest CBD supplements might experience nausea, says Dr. Matharu-Daley. This depends on how sensitive the person is to CBD, as well as the amount they ingest. Because CBD supplements come in so many different formssuch as oils, gummies, tinctures, and vaporsthe amount thats actually absorbed can vary drastically. This, combined with each person, will ultimately affect which (if any) CBD side effects you might experience. What Is Cannabidiol (CBD)? CBDthe abbreviation for cannabidiol, a substance that’s generally derived from the hemp planthas skyrocketed in popularity over the last five years. In fact, according to research, “CBD” as a Google search term remained stable from 2004 to 2014 but has since ballooned by up to 605%. CBD is one of the many chemical compounds that is found in the cannabis plantreferred to as cannabis sativa. There are two primary parts of the plant that humans use. One is THC, or Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol, and the other is CBD. Though they’re from the same plant, THC and CBD are quite different from each other. CBD is not an intoxicating substance, whereas THC is a psychoactive that can get you high, explains Dr. Jas Matharu-Daley, a physician and consultant for a brand that specializes in CBD production. She adds, [Another difference is that] CBD is derived from hemp and has been classified as a legal substance. Hemp has <0.3% THC. Conversely, cannabis plants such as marijuana are grown to have much higher levels of THC and are still illegal according to the FDA, although individual states vary as to their use. What to Know About Marijuana Use Are There Any Benefits Associated With Using CBD? There are several reasons why someone might want to use CBD. The substance can be found in a multitude of products ranging from pain-relieving creams to edible tinctures to skincare. Research is still underway, but over the last few decades scientists have become more aware of how CBD might be beneficial when applied either topically or ingested. Since discovering the endocannabinoid system (ECS) in the body in the 1990s, CBD has been researched more extensively. The ECS is a central regulatory system restoring normal balance and homeostasis in a range of human physiologic systems throughout the body and brain and has cannabinoid receptors and chemicals in its function, explains Dr. Matharu-Daley. CBD benefits include the following: CBD can have positive impact on the brain. In fact, Dr. Matharu-Daley says that the substance is legally prescribed in a specific medication for certain severe forms of epilepsy in children. It has also been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties, which is why you often see CBD in topical products such as oils, creams, and lotions. Some research points to CBDs ability to relieve stress and anxiety. It has been used as a nausea treatment in some countries. CBD may potentially reduce pain symptoms. It has antioxidant properties, which means it can help fight off free radical damages that leads to premature aging. Regarding skincare, CBD may help reduce excessive oil production in those with very oily skin types. Ultimately, the primary reasons why people use CBD is because it tends to have calming, relaxing, pain-reducing effects. It has been used to alleviate joint pain and nerve pain, reduce anxiety and stress, treat insomnia, improve migraines, and address nausea. CBD Is Still an Unregulated Substance It’s important to point out that CBD is not regulated by the FDA and therefore dosages might not be accurate. Its also difficult to know what an appropriate dose is the first time you try a new product. If the CBD is from a reputable source and one that has been inspected by a third-party independent lab, the content of CBD is more reliable, notes Dr. Matharu-Daley. The CBD should be organically grown, free of pesticides and heavy metals, and not sourced in food which can affect absorption. Generally, CBD is safe and side effects are few at low doses. The Potential Side Effects of CBD A Word From Verywell CBD is technically an unregulated substance in the United States and therefore it ought to be used with caution. This is especially important for those taking additional medications and/or those with ongoing medical issues. That said, preliminary research on CBD and its benefits are promising in relation to helping with mild to moderate health concerns and it is generally considered a safe substance. Health professionals do not consider CBD a cure-all for serious medical issues, including cancer. As with any sort of supplement, we recommend speaking to your medical doctor about whether using CBD makes sense for you. Your doctor can also recommend certain products that align with your needs and help ensure you get the correct dosage. Was this page helpful? Thanks for your feedback! Learn the best ways to manage stress and negativity in your life. Sign Up You’re in! Thank you, {{form.email}}, for signing up. There was an error. Please try again. What are your concerns? Other Inaccurate Hard to Understand Submit 4 Sources Verywell Mind uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy. Oberbarnscheidt T, Miller NS. The impact of cannabidiol on psychiatric and medical conditions. J Clin Med Res. 2020;12(7):393-403. doi:10.14740/jocmr4159 Leas EC, Nobles AL, Caputi TL, Dredze M, Smith DM, Ayers JW. Trends in internet searches for cannabidiol (CBD) in the United States. JAMA Netw Open. 2019;2(10):e1913853. doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2019.13853 Mortimer TL, Mabin T, Engelbrecht A-M. Cannabinoids: the lows and the highs of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Future Oncology. 2019;15(9):1035-1049. doi:10.2217/fon-2018-0530 Atalay S, Jarocka-Karpowicz I, Skrzydlewska E. Antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties of cannabidiol. Antioxidants. 2019;9(1):21. doi:10.3390/antiox9010021 Speak to a Therapist for Social Anxiety Disorder Advertiser Disclosure The offers that appear in this table are from partnerships from which Verywell Mind receives compensation.

What are the negative side effects of hemp oil?

Anxiety..Changes in appetite..Changes in mood..Diarrhea..Dizziness..Drowsiness..Dry mouth..Nausea.

Is hemp oil safe to take?

Whether applied topically or ingested orally, hempseed oil offers numerous benefits for skin health, and many people can take advantage of those benefits. Hemp oil is considered safe for most people to use, and it can help moisturize the skin from the inside out.

What does hemp oil do for the body?

Promotes Heart Health. Hemp seed oil is rich in linoleic acid. Studies have shown that eating a diet high in linoleic acid significantly reduces total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL), or “bad” cholesterol. Lowering cholesterol levels reduces your risk of high blood pressure, stroke, and heart disease.

Can hemp oil make you sick?

Nausea and gastrointestinal issues are a pretty common side effect of CBD oil. This can lead to vomiting, diarrhea, dizziness and other symptoms associated with a digestive problem (think how you would feel after eating something that disagreed with you). In part, some people simply don’t digest CBD oil well.

Diet and Nutrition What Is Hemp? Nutritional Advantages of Eating Hemp Seeds and Hempseed Oil By Sherry Christiansen Sherry Christiansen Sherry Christiansen is a medical writer with a healthcare background. She has worked in the hospital setting and collaborated on Alzheimer’s research. Learn about our editorial process Updated on September 22, 2021 Medically reviewed Verywell Health articles are reviewed by board-certified physicians and healthcare professionals. Medical Reviewers confirm the content is thorough and accurate, reflecting the latest evidence-based research. Content is reviewed before publication and upon substantial updates. Learn more. by Lana Butner, ND, LAc Medically reviewed by Lana Butner, ND, LAc Facebook LinkedIn Lana Butner, ND, LAc, is a board-certified naturopathic doctor and licensed acupuncturist in private practice in New York City. Learn about our Medical Review Board Fact checked Verywell Health content is rigorously reviewed by a team of qualified and experienced fact checkers. Fact checkers review articles for factual accuracy, relevance, and timeliness. We rely on the most current and reputable sources, which are cited in the text and listed at the bottom of each article. Content is fact checked after it has been edited and before publication. Learn more. by Nick Blackmer Fact checked by Nick Blackmer LinkedIn Nick Blackmer is a librarian, fact-checker, and researcher with more than 20 years experience in consumer-oriented health and wellness content. Learn about our editorial process Print Verywell / Anastasiia Tretiak Table of Contents View All Table of Contents Health Benefits Possible Side Effects Selection, Preparation, Storage Common Questions Hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) is grown for use in many different products. Hemp is made into foods, health products, fabric, rope, natural remedies, and much more. Different parts of the hemp plant are used to make different products. Hemp seeds are edible and highly nutritious. They have a high concentration of fiber. They also contain omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids. These fatty acids are nutrients that are important for heart and skin health. Hemp is sometimes confused with marijuana. Hemp, however, contains only trace amounts of THC, the main chemical in the marijuana plant that makes people get “high.” Because hemp contains little THC, it is grown for non-drug use. This article discusses some of the health benefits of hemp, its uses, and its potential side effects. It also answers some common questions about hemp and how it should be used and stored. Also Known As Narrow-leaf hempBitter rootCatchflyIndian hempMilkweedWild cotton Does Hemp Offer Any Benefits? There are three different plants in the Cannabis genus, also called the Cannabaceae family. These include Cannabis sativa, Cannabis indica, and Cannabis ruderalis. Hemp varieties of Cannabis contain 0.3% or less THC. Marijuana varieties have more than 0.3%. Higher amounts of THC can produce a high. The seeds are the main edible part of the hemp plant. The leaves can be used to make tea, but most of the nutrients are in the seeds. In fact, hemp seeds are over 30% fat, including essential fatty acids. The potential health benefits of hemp, therefore, come mainly from its seeds. Hemp Seeds Hemp seeds are, as the name implies, the seeds of the hemp plant. Hemp hearts are seeds that have had the shell removed. Hemp seeds are high in soluble and insoluble fiber. Soluble fiber dissolves in water, while insoluble fiber does not. Both types of fiber are important for digestion. Because hemp hearts lack the fibrous shell, they are lower in fiber and other nutrients than whole hemp seeds. Hemp seeds are also rich in gamma-linolenic acid (GLA). GLA is an omega-6 fatty acid that has been shown to have many health benefits. A 2016 study found that GLA has strong anti-inflammatory properties. Hemp seeds contain a 3-to-1 ratio of omega-3 to omega-6 fatty acids. This is considered an optimal ratio for heart and brain health. This ratio is difficult to get in the Western diet. Western diets tend to be too heavy in omega-6 fatty acids, which can be found in foods like vegetable oil. Many Western diets don’t contain enough omega-3 fatty acids. These are found in foods like salmon and other wild-caught, cold-water fish. Hemp seeds contain many nutrients, including protein, minerals (such as magnesium, calcium, iron, and zinc), and vitamins. Whole hemp seeds contain 20% soluble and 80% insoluble fiber. The fiber in hemp seeds may help digestion. It may also help lower bad cholesterol and improve heart health. The insoluble fiber in hemp seeds has also been linked to a lower risk of diabetes. Hemp Oil vs. CBD Oil Hemp oil is also called hempseed oil. It is made by cold-pressing hemp seeds. Hempseed oil is different from CBD oil. CBD oil is extracted from the cannabis plant and then combined with a base oil. Examples of base oils include coconut or olive oil. Hempseed oil comes from hemp seeds only. It is not derived from the Cannabis plant itself. Hempseed oil does not contain any psychoactive properties. You can not use it to get high. Hemp oil has unique properties and health benefits. Hemp oil contains healthy nutrients such as: ProteinsEssential fatty acids (EFAs), which are important for good healthMinerals like zinc, magnesium, calcium, iron, and moreAntioxidants like vitamin E Hemp oil can be used as a cooking oil. Just like any other type of healthy oil, it can be added to foods such as salads, dips, and spreads. Animal studies have suggested that hempseed oil may lower blood pressure. It may also reduce the risk of stroke and heart attack. This hasn’t been proven in human studies, though. Hemp oil is often used as a hair conditioner or a skin moisturizer. Some studies found that hemp seed oil may improve dry, itchy skin and help symptoms of eczema, a common skin condition. When used for eczema symptoms, it may reduce the need for prescription medication. Recap Hemp oil is not the same as CBD oil. Hemp oil comes from the seed of the hemp plant. It can be used for cooking or as a hair conditioner or skin moisturizer. Hemp Protein Hemp protein is a powder made from the seeds of the hemp plant. Hemp protein contains all nine essential amino acids. Amino acids are the building blocks of protein. Some studies, though, have shown that hemp protein isn’t as good a source of one amino acid, lysine, compared to soy protein. Hemp protein is a good choice for vegetarians or vegans because it contains essential fatty acids. Whole hemp seeds contain about 25% protein. This is higher than flax or chia seeds, which contain only around 20% and 18% protein, respectively. Other Health Benefits There is not enough clinical research data to back up claims that hemp is a safe or effective treatment for any condition. People still use it as a remedy for many illnesses, though, including: AsthmaCoughBloatingArthritisSyphilisPneumoniaHeart problemsUrinary conditions (increasing urine flow)Warts (when applied to the skin) How It Works Hemp contains chemicals that may affect the heart and might help reduce blood pressure. Hemp also contains terpenes. Terpenes are the compounds that give plants their distinctive odors. Some studies suggest that terpenes may have health benefits. These benefits may include: Neuroprotective or brain-protective benefitsAnti-inflammatory benefitsAnti-tumor properties Recap Hemp contains more protein than seeds like chia and flaxseed. It also contains other substances that may have health effects. Some people claim it can help with certain illnesses, though this has not been proven through clinical research. Possible Side Effects of Hemp Seed Taking whole hemp seed by mouth can cause many side effects, including: Throat irritationDiarrheaNausea and vomitingBradycardia, or slow heart rateHypertension, or high blood pressure There is not enough clinical research data to prove that hemp is safe for use in people who are pregnant or breastfeeding. There is also not enough research to show it is safe to use topically on the skin. Eating hemp seeds is not considered as unsafe as is eating hemp leaves or other parts of the plant. But because of the high fat content, the seeds can cause mild diarrhea. Interaction with Medications Do not ingest hemp when taking cardiac glycosides or diuretics. Cardiac Glycosides Cardiac glycosides, such as Lanoxin (digoxin), help the heart beat strongly and can slow down the heart rate. They are used for treating heart failure (in which the heart can’t pump blood well enough to meet the body’s needs) and irregular heartbeats. Hemp is also known to slow the heart rate. Taking hemp with cardiac glycosides could slow the heart rate too much. Ask your doctor before taking hemp with Lanoxin. Diuretics Diuretics are drugs that increase the amount of urine. They are used to reduce the amount of fluid in the body and lower blood pressure. Diuretics include: Diuril (chlorothiazide)Thalitone (chlorthalidone)Lasix (furosemide)Microzide (hydrochlorothiazide)Others An increase in the amount of urine may lead to a loss of potassium. Hemp can also decrease potassium. Taking diuretics and hemp together may result in dangerously low potassium levels. This might cause problems with heart function. Verywell / Anastasia Tretiak Selection, Preparation, and Storage of Hemp Seed Hemp seeds can be eaten raw, roasted, or cooked with other foods. In China, hemp seed oil has been used as food or made into medicine for thousands of years. There are many ways to eat hemp protein, oil, and seeds, including: In a smoothieOn oatmeal or cerealSprinkled over saladsAs a nut butterAs a form of milk called hemp milkOn yogurtIn meal bars or granola barsIn salad dressingOn casserole dishesAdded to baked goodsIn recipesAs a cooking oil Storage Hemp seeds need to be stored properly. The healthy fats in hemp seeds can degrade if they are exposed to air for long periods. Storing hemp seeds at high temperatures can have a similar effect. Hemp seeds stored this way could contain unhealthy trans fats, a type of fat especially linked to heart disease. Store hemp seeds and hemp oil in an airtight container. Keep these products in a cool, dark place. It is best to refrigerate hemp products after opening. Many hemp products come in different forms, including: Hemp oilHemp milkHemp protein powder Many of these products can be purchased in health food stores or online. Cooking hemp seeds or heating the oil to temperatures above 350 degrees F can destroy the healthy fatty acids. Hemp seeds and oil are best eaten raw. If cooking with hemp oil, use low heat. Dosage The dosage of any herbal or natural supplement, including hemp, depends on several factors. Age and health condition are two important considerations. Never take more than the recommended dosage on the package insert. Always ask your doctor before taking hemp or any other herb. The recommended dosage may not be right for you. If you are going to eat hemp seeds, experts suggest starting slow. This is especially true if you have digestive problems. Start with 1 teaspoon and work up to more as tolerated. Recap Ask your doctor before taking hemp. Your safe dosage may be different than what is on the packaging. Selection Hemp seeds are grown in many different countries. Some people prefer hemp from Canada for its taste and the strict government restrictions aimed to improve quality. Look for products that have been tested in the lab for purity and potency. Consult the manufacturer if you have questions. Regulations on hemp grown in U.S., Europe, and Canada are stricter than in other countries, such as China. Common Questions Are hemp seed hearts the same as hemp seed? No. Hemp hearts have had the fibrous shell removed. This makes them lower in fiber and other nutrients than whole hemp seeds. Hemp hearts are not as nutritious as whole hemp seeds. However, hemp hearts are very high in healthy polyunsaturated fats. Are hemp seeds legal to ingest in the U.S.? Yes, hemp seeds are legal in the United States. Hemp seeds in the U.S. must contain a minimal amount of THC. THC is the psychoactive part of the cannabis plant. According to the FDA, some hemp products are safe for food, including: Hemp seedsHemp seed protein powderHempseed oil Can eating hemp cause a person to fail a drug test? No. Eating moderate amounts of hempseed oil, protein powder made of hemp, or hemp seeds will not cause you to fail a drug test. Hemp contains only trace amounts of THC. Unless you are using other varieties of the Cannabis plant, such as marijuana, or you are eating large amounts of hemp, you are unlikely to fail a drug test. Hemp hearts do not contain any THC. The shells of whole hemp seed do have trace amounts below 0.3% THC. If you are recovering from cannabis addiction or just want to avoid exposure to THC in any amount, avoid eating whole hemp seeds. What does hemp taste like? Hemp seeds have a mild, nutty flavor. They are similar to unsalted sunflower seeds, but the texture is not as hard. Summary Hemp seeds are a good source of protein and fiber. Hemp seeds may also have other health benefits, though there is not enough clinical research to say for sure. Because hemp may interact with some drugs and cause certain side effects, it is a good idea to consult your doctor before adding hemp seeds to your diet. Was this page helpful? Thanks for your feedback! Sign up for our Health Tip of the Day newsletter, and receive daily tips that will help you live your healthiest life. Sign Up You’re in! Thank you, {{form.email}}, for signing up. There was an error. Please try again. What are your concerns? Other Inaccurate Hard to Understand Submit 17 Sources Verywell Health uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy. Vonapartis E, Aubin M, Seguin P, Mustafa AF, Charron J. Seed composition of ten industrial hemp cultivars approved for production in Canada, J Food Compost Anal. 2015;39:8-12. doi:10.1016/j.jfca.2014.11.004 uk-Goaszewska K, Goaszewski J. 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Cannabidiol (CBD) is often covered in the media, and you may see it touted as an add-in booster to your post-workout smoothie or morning coffee. You can even buy a CBD-infused sports bra. But what exactly is CBD? And why is it so popular?

CBD is readily obtainable in most parts of the United States, though its exact legal status has been in flux. The Farm Bill removed all hemp-derived products, including CBD, from the Controlled Substances Act, which criminalizes the possession of drugs.

Other research identifies how CBD may inhibit inflammatory and neuropathic pain, which are difficult treat. Animal models of addiction suggest it may also help lessen cravings for alcohol, cannabis, opiates, and stimulants. People taking high doses of CBD may show abnormalities in liver related blood tests.

CBD comes in many forms, including oils, extracts, capsules, patches, vapes, and topical preparations for use on skin. If youre hoping to reduce inflammation and relieve muscle and joint pain, a topical CBD-infused oil, lotion or cream or even a bath bomb — may be the best option. Alternatively, a CBC patch or a tincture or spray designed to be placed under the tongue allows CBD to directly enter the bloodstream.

Outside of the US, the prescription drug Sativex, which uses CBD as an active ingredient, is approved for muscle spasticity associated with multiple sclerosis and for cancer pain. We need more research but CBD may prove to be a helpful, relatively non-toxic option for managing anxiety, insomnia, and chronic pain. Without sufficient high-quality evidence in human studies, we cant pinpoint effective doses, and because CBD currently is typically available as an unregulated supplement, its hard to know exactly what you are getting.

As a service to our readers, Harvard Health Publishing provides access to our library of archived content.

Barnes, M. P. Sativex: clinical efficacy and tolerability in the treatment of symptoms of multiple sclerosis and neuropathic pain. Expert.Opin.Pharmacother. 2006;7(5):607-615. View abstract.

Consroe, P., Laguna, J., Allender, J., Snider, S., Stern, L., Sandyk, R., Kennedy, K., and Schram, K. Controlled clinical trial of cannabidiol in Huntington’s disease. Cunha, J. M., Carlini, E. A., Pereira, A. E., Ramos, O. L., Pimentel, C., Gagliardi, R., Sanvito, W. L., Lander, N., and Mechoulam, R. Chronic administration of cannabidiol to healthy volunteers and epileptic patients.

Ohlsson, A., Lindgren, J. E., Andersson, S., Agurell, S., Gillespie, H., and Hollister, L. E. Single-dose kinetics of deuterium-labelled cannabidiol in man after smoking and intravenous administration. Wade, D. T., Collin, C., Stott, C., and Duncombe, P. Meta-analysis of the efficacy and safety of Sativex (nabiximols), on spasticity in people with multiple sclerosis. Wade, D. T., Makela, P., Robson, P., House, H., and Bateman, C. Do cannabis-based medicinal extracts have general or specific effects on symptoms in multiple sclerosis?

Watzl, B., Scuderi, P., and Watson, R. R. Marijuana components stimulate human peripheral blood mononuclear cell secretion of interferon-gamma and suppress interleukin-1 alpha in vitro. Bergamaschi MM, Queiroz RH, Chagas MH, et al. Cannabidiol reduces the anxiety induced by simulated public speaking in treatment-nave social phobia patients. Carroll CB, Bain PG, Teare L, et al. Cannabis for dyskinesia in Parkinson disease: a randomized double-blind crossover study.

Crippa JA, Derenusson GN, Ferrari TB, et al. Neural basis of anxiolytic effects of cannabidiol (CBD) in generalized social anxiety disorder: a preliminary report. Kavia RB, De Ridder D, Constantinescu CS, et al. Randomized controlled trial of Sativex to treat detrusor overactivity in multiple sclerosis. Lee CY, Wey SP, Liao MH, et al. A comparative study on cannabidiol-induced apoptosis in murine thymocytes and EL-4 thymoma cells.

Magen I, Avraham Y, Ackerman Z, et al. Cannabidiol ameliorates cognitive and motor impairments in mice with bile duct ligation. Morgan CJ, Das RK, Joye A, et al. Cannabidiol reduces cigarette consumption in tobacco smokers: preliminary findings. Notcutt W, Langford R, Davies P, et al. A placebo-controlled, parallel group, randomized withdrawal study of subjects with symptoms of spasticity due to multiple sclerosis who are receiving long-term Sativex (nabiximols).

Novotna A, Mares J, Ratcliffe S, et al. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, enriched-design study of nabiximols* (Sativex), as add-on therapy, in subjects with refractory spasticity cause by multiple sclerosis. Schubart CD, Sommer IE, van Gastel WA, et al. Cannabis with high cannabidiol content is associated with fewer psychotic experiences. Potent inhibition of human cytochrome P450 3A isoforms by cannabidiol: role of phenolic hydroxyl groups in the resorcinol moiety.

Yamaori S, Kushihara M, Yamamoto I, Watanabe K. Characterization of major phytocannabinoids, cannabidiol and cannabinol, as isoform-selective potent inhibitors of human CYP1 enzymes. Consroe, P., Kennedy, K., and Schram, K. Assay of plasma cannabidiol by capillary gas chromatography/ion trap mass spectroscopy following high-dose repeated daily oral administration in humans. Consroe, P., Laguna, J., Allender, J., Snider, S., Stern, L., Sandyk, R., Kennedy, K., and Schram, K. Controlled clinical trial of cannabidiol in Huntington’s disease.

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Is cannabidiol legal?

CBD is readily obtainable in most parts of the United States, though its exact legal status has been in flux. All 50 states have laws legalizing CBD with varying degrees of restriction. In December 2015, the FDA eased the regulatory requirements to allow researchers to conduct CBD trials. In 2018, the Farm Bill made hemp legal in the United States, making it virtually impossible to keep CBD illegal – that would be like making oranges legal, but keeping orange juice illegal.The Farm Bill removed all hemp-derived products, including CBD, from the Controlled Substances Act, which criminalizes the possession of drugs. In essence, this means that CBD is legal if it comes from hemp, but not if it comes from cannabis (marijuana) – even though it is the exact same molecule. Currently, many people obtain CBD online without a medical marijuana license, which is legal in most states.

Is CBD safe?

CBD has been touted for a wide variety of health issues, but the strongest scientific evidence is for its effectiveness in treating some of the cruelest childhood epilepsy syndromes, such as Dravet syndrome and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS), which typically don’t respond to antiseizure medications. In numerous studies, CBD was able to reduce the number of seizures, and, in some cases, stop them altogether. Epidiolex, which contains CBD, is the first cannabis-derived medicine approved by the FDA for these conditions.Animal studies, and self-reports or research in humans, suggest CBD may also help with:

How can CBD be taken?

CBD comes in many forms, including oils, extracts, capsules, patches, vapes, and topical preparations for use on skin. If you’re hoping to reduce inflammation and relieve muscle and joint pain, a topical CBD-infused oil, lotion or cream – or even a bath bomb — may be the best option. Alternatively, a CBC patch or a tincture or spray designed to be placed under the tongue allows CBD to directly enter the bloodstream.Outside of the US, the prescription drug Sativex, which uses CBD as an active ingredient, is approved for muscle spasticity associated with multiple sclerosis and for cancer pain. Within the US, Epidiolex is approved for certain types of epilepsy and tuberous sclerosis.

The bottom line on cannabidiol

Some CBD manufacturers have come under government scrutiny for wild, indefensible claims, such that CBD is a cure-all for cancer or COVID-19, which it is not. We need more research but CBD may prove to be a helpful, relatively non-toxic option for managing anxiety, insomnia, and chronic pain. Without sufficient high-quality evidence in human studies, we can’t pinpoint effective doses, and because CBD currently is typically available as an unregulated supplement, it’s hard to know exactly what you are getting.If you decide to try CBD, make sure you are getting it from a reputable source. And talk with your doctor to make sure that it won’t affect any other medicines you take.

Disclaimer:

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