Goldfish With Big Eyes?

The telescope eye (Japanese: , romanized: Demekin) is a goldfish characterised by its protruding eyes.[1][2][3] It was first developed in the early 1700s in China, where the trait was referred to as dragon eyes.

Demekins are available in red, red-and-white, calico, black-and-white, chocolate, blue, lavender, kirin, chocolate-and-blue and black coloration. In the presentation, the fish was in good body condition, (Bartlett et al., 2021) Meaning that the mutation does not typically affect how the species lives and could live a normal life with such mutations with typical diseases a normal goldfish would have.

A young orange telescope losing its black pigmentation.Most telescopes have deep bodies and long, flowing finnage, with characteristic protruding eyes, but the original is fan-tailed and has a similar body to the fantail goldfish , from which they are derived. They can grow up to a length of 4-10 inches, but may lose their velvet-like appearance with increasing age (lifespan: 6 to 25 years). However, they are often culled as they do not conform to the telescope eye feature for the Moor variety.

In 1941, Moscow aquarist P. Andrianov, bred a kind of black telescope with orange-red eyes. The Blackamoor goldfish is featured on a commemorative 2018 postage stamp from Mozambique. Young moors resemble bronze fantails and their protruding eyes gradually develop with age.

Fancy Goldfish: A Complete Guide to Care and Collecting, Weatherhill, Shambala Publications, Inc., 2006. – ISBN 0-8348-0448-4 ^ Bristol Aquarists’ Society, Bristol Aquarists.org, United Kingdom , retrieved on: 4 June 2007 ^ Blackamoor stamp ^ “Black Moor Goldfish Facts & Care Guide: Fish Species” . “Bilateral intraocular malignant neuroectodermal tumors in a telescope goldfish (Carassius auratus)”.

PMID20840084 .Kon, T.; Omori, Y.; Fukuta, K.; Wada, H.; Watanabe, M.; Chen, Z.; Iwasaki, M.; Mishina, T.; Matsuzaki, S. S.; Yoshihara, D.; Arakawa, J.; Kawakami, K.; Toyoda, A.; Burgess, S. M.; Noguchi, H.; Furukawa, T. (2020).

What are the goldfish with big eyes called?

Black Moor Goldfish Facts & Overview. Each variety of Fancy Goldfish has its own distinctive features and for Black Moors, it’s their large telescopic eyes. You may see these fish called Telescopes because of this. Other names include Moors, Demekin, or Dragon Eyes.

Why does my goldfish have huge eyes?

Some fish breeds—like the Black Moor goldfish and the Celestial Eye goldfish—are prized for their large telescoping eyes, which are perfectly normal and healthy. Sometimes, however, cloudy and swollen eyes can indicate popeye disease in your aquarium fish.

Can telescope goldfish live in a pond?

These fish are very undemanding of water quality and temperature. They can do well in a goldfish aquarium or even a pond if the environment is safe, well maintained, and tankmates are not competitive. When it comes to feeding, the Telescope Goldfish will not thrive with fast, competitive tankmates.

The Black Moor Goldfish is basically a black version of the Telescope Goldfish, though the eyes usually don’t protrude as far as they do on the Telescope!

Black Moors are very popular gold fish and can be found in collectors’ tanks around the world. Additionally, most of these goldfish are hardy enough to live at colder temperatures (as long as the cooling drops only a few degrees a day), which makes them ideal for outdoor ponds.

While the Black Moor is hardy enough to withstand colder temperatures, its telescopic eyes cause it to see poorly. The other hardy goldfish mentioned above make unsuitable companions for the Black Moor because they are all too competitive during feeding time. Report Broken Video A large, 17 cm Black Moor Goldfish shows off its colors!

They inhabit the slow moving and stagnant waters of rivers, lakes, ponds, and ditches feeding on plants, detritus, small crustaceans, and insects. This fish has a wide range across the waters of the European continent, running west to east from England to Russia, north to Scandinavian countries in the Arctic Circle and as far south as the central France and the Black Sea. The Black Moor Goldfish is egg-shaped with a short, stubby body and large eyes protruding from either side of its head.

Since they are omnivorous , the Black Moor Goldfish will generally eat all kinds of fresh, frozen, and flake foods. The Black Moors’ protruding eyes give them poor vision, so they need extra time to feed. Setting up a goldfish aquarium in a manner that will keep your fish happy and healthy is the first step to success.

A filtration system will remove much of the detritus, excess foods, and waste, which keeps the tank clean and maintains the general health of the goldfish. A large surface area minimizes the possibility that the goldfish will suffer from an oxygen shortage. Oval or round tanks that are wide in the middle and narrower toward the top might be filled less than full to maximize the surface area.

A quick temperature drop can kill them, so heaters are strongly advised for goldfish in very cold climates. Provide a gravel substrate to help create a natural and comfortable environment for your fish. A smaller aquarium will stunt the Black Moor’s growth and potentially lead to health problems.

Venomous: No Temperament: Peaceful Compatible with: Same species – conspecifics: Yes Peaceful fish (): Safe Semi-Aggressive (): Threat Shrimps, Crabs, Snails: Safe – not aggressive Plants: Threat – Goldfish will eat many kinds of aquatic plants. It is impossible to sex Goldfish when they are young and not in breeding season, but generally the male is smaller and more slender than the female. Many breeders will also separate the males and females for a few weeks prior to breeding to help increase their interest in spawning.

The tank will need a lush environment with solid surfaces for the spawning process and for the eggs to adhere to. Feeding lots of high protein food such live brine shrimp and worms during this time will also induce spawning. Feed small amounts three times a day, but don’t overfeed because any uneaten scraps will sink to the bottom and foul the water.

At first the fry are a dark brown or black color in order to better hide and not be eaten by larger fish. They gain their adult color after several months and can be put in with larger fish once they reach about 1 inch long. When treating it is best to move the afflicted fish into a separate tank with no gravel or plants, and do regular partial water changes.

Another is fish lice (Argulus) which are flattened mite-like crustaceans about 5 mm long that attach themselves to the body of the goldfish. This can be caused by a number of things: constipation, poor nutrition, a physical deformity, or a parasitic infection. Feeding frozen peas (defrosted) has been noted to help alleviate the symptoms and correct the problem in some cases.

Anyway, this dialog is from the story of Little Red Riding Hood. I am sorry if this doesnt make sense to you but I get reminded of it every time I see or think about Telescope goldfish.

Photo by Benson Kua, CC BY You would think with such big eyes, the Telescope goldfish will have very good vision, right? What you need to worry about though is whether this breed of goldfish is able to compete for food with their bad eyesight.

This means that it is darn adorable with its chubby look and wobbly swimming style. It is better to keep it with equally slow swimming goldfish such as Oranda , Ranchu , Lionhead, Bubble-eyes and Celestial eyes so that it has a chance to compete for food. These breeds will finish the food before the poor Telescope goldfish manages to swim over.

You can find them in a solid color of red, orange, yellow, blue, chocolate, white and black; or in bi-colored of red/white or black/white; or in tri-colored and calico. Photo by Benson Kua, CC BY In general, the following rules on goldfish keeping applies: They will require more consideration in taking care of the delicate protruding eyes.

I cant help but to quote this dialog from Little Red Riding Hood again, just because this goldfish breed always reminds me of it: However, we must remember that although the distinctive characteristic about telescope goldfish is on its huge protruding eyes, it is its whole package that makes this breed interesting.

Description[edit]

Except for its enlarged projecting eyes, the demekin is similar to the ryukin and fantail. It has a deep body and long flowing fins, some with veiled fins and some with broad, or short fins, like the “China doll”. Demekins are available in red, red-and-white, calico, black-and-white, chocolate, blue, lavender, kirin, chocolate-and-blue and black coloration. They may either have metallic, matted, or nacreous scales. Telescope eyes can grow quite large.The telescope goldfish also known as the Carassius auratus is similar to the household goldfish. This particular species is a variant because it has a tumor in either its left or right that somehow bubbles out. The eyes of the fish typically both have the bubble which according to (Kon et al., 2021) it is “A naturally occurring medulloepithelioma has been documented in a goldfish,” The life span of the Goldfish is that of the normal goldfish. The most prominent discovery is that the Goldfish lives up to six months. Some studies show that “. . . appeared systemically ill during the course of the ocular disease. In the presentation, the fish was in good body condition, (Bartlett et al., 2021)” Meaning that the mutation does not typically affect how the species lives and could live a normal life with such mutations with typical diseases a normal goldfish would have.

Black Moor[edit]

TheBlack moor are believed to originate from China in the 1400s. In the 1500s they were traded in Japan, and lastly, in the 1800s, they made their way to the U.S.. It is widely accepted they were a result of selective fish breeding by Chinese who first called them Dragon Fish or Dragon Eyes.Most telescopes have deep bodies and long, flowing finnage, with characteristic protruding eyes, but the original is fan-tailed and has a similar body to the fantail goldfish, from which they are derived.Young black telescopes resemble bronze fantails. Their black coloration and eye protrusion develop with age. They can grow up to a length of 4-10 inches, but may lose their velvet-like appearance with increasing age (lifespan: 6 to 25 years).A genuine Black Moor never loses its colorIt was once theorized that the blackness in goldfish is only exhibited by the telescope-eyed goldfish and that the black color is only a permanent fixture with telescope eye goldfish. However, with the recent entry of black lionheads, black orandas, black ranchus, black ryukins, black pearlscales, black comets, black bubble eyes, black crosses of two or more goldfish, and black “hibunas”, this view is no longer true.In fact, black telescopes do sometimes spawn normal-eyed offspring, which are black also. However, they are often culled as they do not conform to the telescope eye feature for the Moor variety.Because their eyes are usually large, their vision is poor.Black telescope goldfish are popular because they are hardy fish and because their black color sets them apart from the more abundant orange color. Goldfish are typically easy to care for. Black moors, in particular, are able to withstand a wide variety of temperatures. They do well with other fancy goldfish varieties, especially those with impaired vision such as the bubble eye or Celestial goldfish.In 1941, Moscow aquarist P. Andrianov, bred a kind of black telescope with orange-red eyes.The Blackamoor goldfish is featured on a commemorative 2018 postage stamp from Mozambique.

Panda Telescope[edit]

ThePanda telescopes have protruding eyes. Young moors resemble bronze fantails and their protruding eyes gradually develop with age. They sport a velvety appearance in maturity. However, they may lose this velvet-like appearance with increasing age. They can also lose their panda coloration with age; they may become orange and white or any other color combination. Frequently panda moors will not keep any of their coloration, or they may turn pure white.

White Telescope[edit]

The white telescope has a solid white body which contrasts the black variant, the black telescope goldfish, which has a solid black body. The white moor is a variant of the telescope goldfish.Young white telescopes resemble bronze fantails. Their brown coloration decreases and eye protrusion develops with age. They can grow up to a length of 6 inches. Because their eyes are usually large, their vision is poor.White telescopes are less popular than black telescopes. The white telescopes, in particular, are able to withstand a wide variety of temperatures. They do well with other fancy goldfish varieties.

About Telescope Goldfish Care

In general, the following rules on goldfish keeping applies:Telescope goldfish is not as hardy as its streamlined bodied counterparts such as the common goldfish. They will require more consideration in taking care of the delicate protruding eyes.