Goats With No Ears?

LaMancha, American breed of dairy goat known for its much-reduced external ears. The lineage of LaManchas is uncertain; their relation to goats of the La Mancha region of Spain is not proven. The breed was developed in the early 20th century on the West Coast of the United States from unusually short-eared goats believed to be descended from goats brought to California by Spanish missionaries. Those goats were bred to several other breeds, including Nubians and Alpines, until a distinctive American LaMancha breed was developed. Official recognition by the American Dairy Goat Association came in 1958.

What kind of goats have no ears?

The LaMancha is a type of dairy goat noted for its apparent lack of or much reduced external ears. The LaMancha goat is medium in size and is also noted for a generally calm, quiet, and gentle temperament.

Which breed of goat has almost no outer ears?

The LaMancha dairy goat is born with its unique small ears. In fact, that is the distinguishing feature of this breed. The breed has excellent dairy temperament and is an all-around sturdy animal that can withstand a great deal of hardship and still produce.

What are LaMancha goats known for?

The LaMancha breed is used for milk production and is known for having a high consistency of butterfat in its milk. Their milk produces a high amount of vitamins and minerals, plus it is lower in cholesterol than cow’s milk.

How much are LaMancha goats?

As with any other breed, the price of a LaMancha depends on factors such as availability, the quality of parentage, and the breeder. A quality LaMancha buck can cost anywhere between $400 and $600.

LaMancha goats are easy to recognize, what with those cute little ears, but the exact origin of the breed is not easily traceable. The La Mancha region of south-central Spain seems the most likely source of what we know today as the American LaMancha. Although shepherds in this region had no official name for the tiny-eared goats that frequently appeared in their stock, they did recognize them as being different, referring to them as monas (little monkeys) or monadas (cuties). The lack of an external ear is actually a common genetic mutation that has been noted in goats the world over, including in ancient Persia and more recently in Ethiopia, Egypt, and Turkey.

La Manchas are extremely intelligent goatsthey have a very crafty personality, says Leslie Cooperband, owner of Prairie Fruits Farm and Creamery, a producer of farmstead goats milk cheeses in Illinois.

American LaManchas were created in the 1930s by a woman named Eula F. Frey in Oregon after she had relocated from California. The breed was developed from unusually short-eared goats believed to be descended from goats brought to California by Spanish missionaries.

Official recognition by the American Dairy Goat Association came in 1958. Over the years, the LaMancha was shaped into a low-maintenance grazing breed that has excellent migration abilities.

Perhaps this behavior helps explain the LaMancha breeds strong herding instinct, which causes them to prefer being in a group. LaManchas are easily recognized by their very small outer ear. The gopher ear has an approximate length of one inch, but preferably it is nonexistent with little to no cartilage.

The face must be long and straight; a curved nose of the Nubian type disqualifies a specimen from the show ring. LaManchas have a short and glossy coat with numerous color variations and patterns. LaMancha goats are popular as pets due to their temperament.

LaMancha goats are extremely hardy in a range of climates. Goats are diurnal (active during the day), spending most of their time eating shrubs, trees, herbs, and scrub. At Fossil Rim, LaMancha goats live at the Children’s Animal Center.

The LaMancha is a type of dairy goat noted for its apparent lack of or much reduced external ears. The LaMancha goat is medium in size and is also noted for a generally calm, quiet, and gentle temperament.

The LaMancha has an excellent dairy temperament and is an all-around sturdy animal that can withstand a great deal of hardship and still produce. Through official testing, this breed has established itself in milk production with high butterfat.

LaManchas with a fold exceeding the allowed length cannot be registered as purebred animals.

Origin

LaMancha goats are easy to recognize, what with those cute little ears, but the exact origin of the breed is not easily traceable. The La Mancha region of south-central Spain seems the most likely source of what we know today as the American LaMancha. Although shepherds in this region had no official name for the tiny-eared goats that frequently appeared in their stock, they did recognize them as being different, referring to them as

History

Chroniclers of the breed speculate that the LaMancha precursors arrived in California with Spanish missionaries in the early days of European exploration of the Americas. Another story indicating their Spanish origin offers an explanation of the source of the name

Appearence

LaManchas are prized for their milk and their adaptability as well as for their most unique feature (or lack thereof)—their ears. LaMancha ears are divided into two types, gopher and elf. Gopher ears have a maximum length of an inch and are almost flat with circular folds, no stiff cartilage, and a tiny flap. Elf ears are similar but are up to two inches in length, with some cartilage.Other notable physical characteristics of the breed include a straight nose and a short, glossy coat that comes in a wide variety of colors and patterns. A LaMancha goat’s horns are almost always disbudded prior to two weeks of age, but if left to grow, they naturally curl backward like smaller versions of those found on bighorn sheep.

Temperament

When it comes to personality, LaManchas have it in spades. “La Manchas are extremely intelligent goats—they have a very crafty personality,” says Leslie Cooperband, owner of Prairie Fruits Farm and Creamery, a producer of farmstead goat’s milk cheeses in Illinois. “They are usually the first ones to figure out when someone has left a gate unlocked to make their escape from the barn to the orchard or to the stash of grain.” While Cooperband notes that they aren’t quite as social as some other breeds like Nubians, LaManchas are a docile, affectionate, quiet bunch.“LaMancha popularity and numbers have increased enormously in the last 10 years, especially in the commercial dairy setting,” adds Barbara Backus, a longtime LaMancha breeder and the owner of Quixote LaManchas and Goat’s Leap Cheese in Saint Helena, California.