Giant Schnauzer Next to Person?

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The Giant Schnauzer is a breed of dog developed in the 17th century in Germany. It is the largest of the three breeds of Schnauzer—the other two breeds being the Standard Schnauzer and the Miniature Schnauzer. Numerous breeds were used in its development, including the black Great Dane, the Bouvier des Flandres, and the German Pinscher. Originally bred to assist on farms by driving livestock to market and guarding the farmer’s property, the breed eventually moved into the city, where it worked guarding breweries, butchers’ shops, stockyards and factories. It was unknown outside of Bavaria until it became popular as a military dog during World War I and World War II.

Giant SchnauzerOther namesMunich Schnauzer [1] Munchener [1] Russian Bear Schnauzer [2] Origin Germany Weight
35–47 kg (77–104 lb) [3] Bitches
Hight females and males = 60 – 70 cmCoat
Dense, wiryColor
“pepper and salt”, pure black with black undercoat , black/silverLitter size
5-8 [4] Life span
10-12 years [5] Dog ( domestic dog )They have a dense coarse coat that protects them from the weather and from vermin. [1] The origins of the breed are unclear, but sources speculate it originated through some combination of black Great Danes , [1] German Shepherds , [1] Rottweilers , [1] Dobermanns , [1] Boxers , [1] Bouvier des Flandres , [1] Thuringian Shepherds , [2] and the Standard Schnauzer . The Giant Schnauzer was originally bred as a multipurpose farm dog for guarding property and driving animals to market. [8] By the turn of the 20th century the Giant Schnauzer was being used as a watchdog at factories, breweries , butcheries , and stockyards throughout Bavaria. [1] It has the potential to be aggressive, [1] but Giant Schnauzers are usually reserved [2] – they are “amiable in repose, and a commanding figure when aroused”. [1] They are also very energetic and highly spirited, [7] which, when coupled with boredom, can lead to unwanted and destructive behavior. [12] Their beard can collect drool and food particles, making frequent cleanings essential. [14] They are also prone to skin diseases, such as seasonal flank alopecia , vitiligo , and follicular cysts. [14] This susceptibility occurs because melanoma is caused by a defect in the melanocytes , the cells that darken the color of the skin. ^ “Summary results of the Purebred Dog Health Survey for Giant Schnauzers” (PDF) . Report from the Kennel Club/ British Small Animal Veterinary Association Scientific Committee .

Are Giant Schnauzers aggressive?

Giant Schnauzers will make excellent guard dogs. … They can be aggressive toward people, dogs, and other animals they don’t know. They are naturally suspicious of strangers and need to become accustomed to experiencing new people and situations.

Do Schnauzers attach to one person?

Although some breeds attach themselves to one person fast, schnauzers love and appreciate all members of their family. Due to their playful nature, the standard schnauzer loves children. Because of their guard dog history, they can make excellent watchdogs for your home.

Do Giant Schnauzers like to cuddle?

Giant Schnauzers are affectionate companions. While their desire to cuddle may vary, they’re known for loving their person and always wanting to be around them.

Are Giant Schnauzers intelligent?

In reality, Giant Schnauzers are just one intelligence class below – listed as “above average intelligent dogs.” In terms of learning and obedience, they’re not far behind either. The Giant Schnauzer is able to learn a new command with just 15 to 25 repetitions.

Giant schnauzers are as advertised (they can weigh up to 85 pounds) and have plenty of energy, but with the right training they become one of the most loving, loyal companions and make the effort well worth it.

intelligenceshedding amountexercise needsenergy levelbarking leveldrool amountbreed groupcoat length/texturecolorspatternsother traits hypoallergenic easy to train requires lots of grooming cold weather tolerant strong loyalty tendencies good hiking companion His characteristic beard and impressive eyebrows that frame those dark oval eyes will regularly need trimming to stay sleek. The giant schnauzer is a minimal shedder and might be a good fit for some allergy sufferers, though periodic grooming is needed to keep his wiry coat neat and healthy. Giant schnauzers are highly intelligent , and Fojkit describes them as phenomenally trainable dogs, joking that owners “could almost train them to cook you dinner.” As a working dog, giant schnauzers are most content when they have a job to do, whether that’s simply playing fetch , darting through agility courses , or attending obedience training —all things they excel at. This highly intelligent breed doesn’t cope well when left alone for long periods of time, so owners run the risk of their giant schnauzer developing undesirable behaviors if they are lonely and anxious. These dogs have a strong desire to please their owners, so if you’re willing to put the work into proper training, you’ll be rewarded with an incredibly loyal and loving companion. Known more commonly as bloat, the condition occurs when the dog’s stomach twists and cuts off blood supply, sometimes causing death in a matter of hours. “When we spay or neuter any dog of this size, we recommend a simple procedure that stitches the stomach to the body wall, which stops it being able to twist,” Frieman says.

You know those sweet, obedient, adaptable little Miniature Schnauzers? The Giant Schnauzer is not quite the same. Rather, they’re large, strong dogs with natural guarding and territorial instincts. Which isn’t to say that Giants Schnauzers don’t make excellent canine companions. They do. But there are just a few things you should know about this Working Group breed before you decide to own one.

A Giant Schnauzer will enjoy long walks and jogs, playtime in a fenced yard, and learning all of those dog sports they’re so good at. Giants are excellent companions for active owners and will join them for exercise like running, hiking , and swimming. That handsome beard tends to drip water or food if you don’t wipe your Giant Schnauzer’s face after they imbibe. If you’re ready for the challenges of owning a Giant Schnauzer, you’ll be rewarded with their undying devotion for the rest of their life. The AKC is the only purebred dog registry in the United States that maintains an investigation and inspection effort. The AKC conducts thousands of inspections each year to ensure the health, safety, and welfare of dogs and the environments in which they live. There are many other benefits, including a complimentary first vet visit, 30 days of pet insurance, and eligibility to compete in AKC events and sports. The clean lines of this white ceramic mug perfectly show off an image of your favorite breed.

Giant Schnauzer

TheThey have a dense coarse coat that protects them from the weather and from vermin. Giant Schnauzers come in three color varieties: pepper and salt, pure black with black undercoat

History[edit]

The first Giant Schnauzers emerged from Swabia in the German state of Bavaria, and Württemberg in the 17th century.The Giant Schnauzer was originally bred as a multipurpose farm dog for guarding property and driving animals to market.In modern times, the Giant Schnauzer is used as a police dog; is trained for obedience, dog agility, herding, search and rescue, and schutzhund; and is shown in conformation shows.

Description[edit]

Appearance[edit]

Although the Giant Schnauzer is called ‘Giant’, this is not in comparison to other large dog breeds such as the Great Dane or the Rottweiler, but instead in comparison to the Standard and Miniature Schnauzers.The head is 1/2 the length of the dog’s back, when the back is measured from the withers to the base of the tail.

Temperament[edit]

Giant Schnauzers are usually a quiet breed.Giant Schnauzers have been described as trustworthy with children.

Health[edit]

Giant Schnauzers require regular grooming.Hip and elbow dysplasia are common.Some Giant Schnauzers develop central diabetes insipidus, autosomal recessive hypothyroidism, selective malabsorption of cobalamin, narcolepsy, cataplexy, and various seizure disorders.

See also[edit]

Giant Schnauzer

Giant Schnauzer

Giant schnauzers are as advertised (they can weigh up to 85 pounds) and have plenty of energy, but with the right training they become one of the most loving, loyal companions and make the effort well worth it.Majestic and proud, these large dogs can stand more than 27 inches tall, clocking in as a much larger version of their smaller cousins, the standard and miniature schnauzers. With the right obedience training and surroundings—they probably aren’t a good idea for novice dog owners—the giant schnauzer can be a playful family dog well into old age.

Appearance

The tall, sturdy dogs are hard to miss. Much like his smaller cousins, the giant schnauzer has a dense, wiry coat that’s usually black or a salt-and-pepper mix, though his fur can also be fawn or black and tan. His characteristic beard and impressive eyebrows that frame those dark oval eyes will regularly need trimming to stay sleek.The giant schnauzer is a minimal shedder and might be a good fit for some allergy sufferers, though periodic grooming is needed to keep his wiry coat neat and healthy. And while no dog is completely hypoallergenic, schnauzers of all sizes are widely considered to be a great choice for people with dog allergies, though that also depends on the specific person and dog. Before bringing home a giant schnauzer puppy, spend time with the breed to see how your allergies react.

Temperament

Giant schnauzer temperament is generally proud, friendly, and affectionate, provided they’ve been properly socialized and trained from a young age. Because of their large size and larger-than-life personality, the giant schnauzer is not a dog suited to first–time owners or those who are unable to follow a consistent obedience training schedule. But if you do the work, there’s plenty to love about owning a giant schnauzer.Ed Fojkit, an American Kennel Club registered breeder and owner of Tanglewood Giant Schnauzers, grew up with giant schnauzers and says they are playful dogs who cherish every moment with their people.”They make tremendous couch potatoes … or go out in the yard and play Frisbee,” Fojkit says.As a working dog who was bred to guard their people and even livestock, the giant schnauzer has a rich history of having a strong prey drive, meaning you may want to consider keeping him as the only animal in the house. They could chase cats or smaller animals, even other dogs. But if they’re well-socialized from puppyhood and properly introduced to other pets, giant schnauzers can live well with furry roommates.Because of their size and high activity level, giant schnauzers are best suited for people with the time and energy to devote to long play sessions in the yard. They can do well with children, but small kids need to be supervised and taught how to properly interact with animals.Giant schnauzers are highly intelligent, and Fojkit describes them as phenomenally trainable dogs, joking that owners “could almost train them to cook you dinner.” Because of their intelligence and trainability, this breed has been used in police forces and militaries across the globe.

Living Needs

Giant schnauzers are energetic dogs who need a lot of exercise, so they’re best matched to a home with a large, fenced-in yard where they can run and play. If you don’t have a yard, you’ll want to plan on regular long walks to give them exercise. Shlomo Frieman, DVM, founder of the Animal Hospital of Factoria in Bellevue, Wash., says the dogs make great hiking companions and that it’s going to be hard to wear them out no matter how long you walk or play.Giant schnauzers are usually happiest as the only dog in your house, but it’s possible they can get along well with other pets if they’re properly socialized with them as a puppy. Besides, owning a giant schnauzer requires a fair bit of work to burn off all that energy—you may not have the attention to lavish on other pets.As a working dog, giant schnauzers are most content when they have a job to do, whether that’s simply playing fetch, darting through agility courses, or attending obedience training—all things they excel at. Smart dogs like this need to be stimulated physically and intellectually, and giving them what they need will make living with them much easier than trying to fight their natural desire to be working and occupied.You need to consistently be around your dog, too, according to the Giant Schnauzer Club of America. Your giant schnauzer wants to be with you pretty much all the time and requires a fair bit of attention. This highly intelligent breed doesn’t cope well when left alone for long periods of time, so owners run the risk of their giant schnauzer developing undesirable behaviors if they are lonely and anxious.

Care

Grooming is a rather intense affair when you own a giant schnauzer. They have a dense, weather-resistant double coat. And while they barely shed (which gives you the upside of not constantly needing to vacuum up their fur), you will need to trim them in order to keep them neat and tidy.”Their hair will grow and grow, so you can end up with them looking like an Afghan [hound] if you don’t take care of it,” Fojkit says, adding that owners can expect to visit the groomer every six weeks without clipping the coat themselves. On top of that, you’ll need to brush them weekly and stay on top of any tangles.Because giant schnauzers are such smarty-pants, they are considered easy to train. Consistency and positive reinforcement are key. These dogs have a strong desire to please their owners, so if you’re willing to put the work into proper training, you’ll be rewarded with an incredibly loyal and loving companion.

Health

Somewhat unusual for a breed of this size, giant schnauzers have a long average lifespan of 12–15 years and relatively few health issues. Frieman says giant schnauzers benefit from the fact that they aren’t that popular.”When there are lots of people trying to breed a certain type of puppy, it can lead to genetic issues because not everybody is being as careful as they should be to screen these things out,” Frieman says.Giant schnauzer owners should be aware of gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV) complex, a potentially life-threatening problem that can affect large-chested dogs. Known more commonly as bloat, the condition occurs when the dog’s stomach twists and cuts off blood supply, sometimes causing death in a matter of hours. However, there’s a way to hopefully avoid the frightening condition.”When we spay or neuter any dog of this size, we recommend a simple procedure that stitches the stomach to the body wall, which stops it being able to twist,” Frieman says. “It should be a no-brainer to anyone looking to own any giant breed dog.”As with other large breeds, giant schnauzers can suffer from issues like dysplasia in their hips and knees, and Frieman suggests talking about these with your giant schnauzer breeder so that you are fully informed of any medical history in their lineage. It’s also important to keep regular vet visits a priority so they can help identify warning signs.

History

The giant schnauzer originated in Bavarian Germany in the mid-1800s. Not surprisingly, the breed got its start when standard schnauzers were bred with Great Danes to provide the size and stature these dogs are known for, according to the breed club. Historically used as a working dog in Europe, giant schnauzers were tasked with guarding farms, livestock, and homes. They also worked as police or military service dogs.Giant schnauzers were first exported to the United States in the 1920s and ’30s. However, their arrival didn’t make much of a splash because another German dog—the German shepherd—had peaked in popularity. The AKC recognized the giant breed in 1930, after the smaller standard and miniature schnauzers.

1. Giant Schnauzers are imposing dogs.

They stand up to 27.5 inches at the shoulder and can weigh up to 95 pounds. Giant Schnauzers share some physical characteristics with their smaller cousins, the Miniature and Standard Schnauzers, like the harsh eyebrows and beard, as well as a keen, intelligent expression.

2. The three Schnauzer sizes are three different breeds.

Although you may think the three types are the same breed in different sizes, they’re actually three distinct AKC-recognized breeds with independent standards. They were first developed in Germany in the agrarian kingdoms of Bavaria and Wurttemberg as working farm dogs.

3. The Giant Schnauzer is a hard worker.

With their energy and intelligence, there’s no end to the jobs Giant Schnauzers can perform. Originally bred to be all-around workers, they were primarily used to drive cattle from the farm to market, for carting, and to protect the farm and family.

4. They are often employed in important jobs.

Because of their intelligence and need to work, the Giant Schnauzer is successful in many areas, including as police dogs, military dogs, search and rescue dogs, and even as guide dogs.

5. The Giant Schnauzer excels at dog sport competitions.

Giants have earned many titles in tracking, obedience, conformation, and more. Most recently, GCHG CH Ingebar’s Tynan Dances With Wildflowers (“Ty”) won the Working Group at the 2019 AKC National Championship presented by Royal Canin.

6. Giant Schnauzers are loyal and courageous guard dogs.

To them, the most important job is to protect the home and family. Giants are deeply loyal to their families and instinctively territorial. This isn’t one of those happy-go-lucky breeds that greets every visitor with a tail wag. Because they learn easily, though, you can train Giant Schnauzers to differentiate between welcome visitors and everyone else.

7. They are a high-energy breed that needs lots of exercise.

A Giant Schnauzer will enjoy long walks and jogs, playtime in a fenced yard, and learning all of those dog sports they’re so good at. Giants are excellent companions for active owners and will join them for exercise like running, hiking, and swimming.

8. Giant Schnauzers need regular grooming.

Grooming your dog is considered to be a bonding experience, so prepare to bond because the Giant Schnauzer does need regular grooming. Although he doesn’t shed large tumbleweeds of hair, he does need regular brushing. It’s important to keep his head trimmed; with those pronounced eyebrows and beard, his face can virtually disappear under a tangle of hair unless they’re kept neatly trimmed.

9. They’re among the few breeds that sports a beard.

In fact, the pronounced beard is one of the hallmarks of the breed. But it may require some extra attention around the house. That handsome beard tends to drip water or food if you don’t wipe your Giant Schnauzer’s face after they imbibe.

10. Owning a Giant can be challenging, but rewarding.

These are very large, powerful, and energetic dogs. But they’re also loyal, smart, and trainable. This makes them a great choice for owners who are willing to make the commitment and put in the work. If you’re ready for the challenges of owning a Giant Schnauzer, you’ll be rewarded with their undying devotion for the rest of their life.

Purchasing and Registering Your Giant Schnauzer

Think the imposing Giant Schnauzer is the breed for you? Check out Giant Schnauzer puppies on the AKC Marketplace.After becoming the owner of a Giant Schnauzer, it is important to register your dog. Why? The AKC is the only purebred dog registry in the United States that maintains an investigation and inspection effort. The AKC conducts thousands of inspections each year to ensure the health, safety, and welfare of dogs and the environments in which they live.After you register your dog. you will receive your official AKC certificate in the mail. There are many other benefits, including a complimentary first vet visit, 30 days of pet insurance, and eligibility to compete in AKC events and sports.

Beverly Shaffer
Recycling old ones doesn't make them good, or original... AC... and everyone else posting unoriginal stuff. Now run along, before I get deleted for this one, while your recycled crap stays. Cheers :) People need dreams Problem solver. Pop culture fanatic. Twitter fanatic. Proud creator. Zombie mom. Interests: Dancing, Calligraphy
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