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Do you love a good romp through the woods? Wish you had someone to share it with? Meet the German shorthaired pointer—an absolute dream dog for any outdoor enthusiast and your new four-legged best friend.

intelligenceshedding amountexercise needsenergy levelbarking leveldrool amountbreed groupcoat length/texturecolors brown / chocolate / liver If you give your German shorthaired pointer lots of love, affection, and playtime, he’ll reward you with an unbreakable family bond. They’re wonderful companions who love to fetch in the backyard with kids, join their pet parents for a morning jog , and go for a swim (those webbed feet come in handy! Intelligent and active German shorthaired pointers love having a job to do, whether that’s hunting or dog sports like agility or nose work. GSPs have a high prey drive because of their hunting history, which means they’re wired to chase any small animal that crosses their path. Left to his own devices, your playful pointer could become a daring escape artist on a mission to see what the rest of the neighborhood has to offer. German shorthaired pointers are sensitive dogs who need positive reinforcement and a stable living environment to thrive. They’ll also enjoy the occasional bath with mild shampoo—twice a year should be plenty for these dogs, who rely on natural oils to protect their skin. GSPs shed more in the spring and fall and need extra brushing during those seasons to keep them from leaving a trail of little loose hairs behind. Reputable German shorthaired pointer steer breeders will screen for health issues in your puppy. They’re prized for their keen sense of smell, their ability to retrieve waterfowl, and their courage to take on bigger animals like deer.

Is a German Shorthaired Pointer a good family dog?

German Shorthaired Pointers make great family dogs, but can be a handful for small children. … The GSP is a very affectionate, loving companion that mostly likes children and other dogs, though since they’re so rambunctious, some experts advise against having them in households with children under seven.

Why should you not get a German Shorthaired Pointer?

The German Shorthaired Pointer has an almost constant supply of energy, and a profound desire to be with their humans. So, when you put these two things together, one could have an incredibly destructive dog while its family is out of the house due to how easily this breed can develop separation anxiety.

How much does a German Shorthaired Pointer cost?

$600–$1,500. A German Shorthaired Pointer costs between $600 and $1,500, depending on the breeder you choose.

Will a German Shorthaired Pointer protect you?

While they are a very friendly dog as long as they have been socialized early, a German Shorthaired Pointer can be very protective of his humans and home. Some will have more of an intense need to protect their pack than others, but in general, this is not an aggressive breed.

The versatile German Shorthaired Pointer sporting dog breed hunts many types of game, retrieves on land or from water, and is an affectionate companion. They have a striking, easy-care coat, but they need plenty of vigorous exercise.

The versatile German Shorthaired Pointer sportingdog breed hunts many types of game, retrieves on land or from water, and is an affectionate companion. Low-sensitivity dogs, also called “easygoing,” “tolerant,” “resilient,” and even “thick-skinned,” can better handle a noisy, chaotic household, a louder or more assertive owner, and an inconsistent or variable routine. Breed isn’t the only factor that goes into affection levels; dogs who were raised inside a home with people around feel more comfortable with humans and bond more easily. Mouthy dogs are more likely to use their mouths to hold or “herd” their human family members, and they need training to learn that it’s fine to gnaw on chew toys, but not on people. These breeds generally aren’t a good fit for homes with smaller pets that can look like prey, such as cats, hamsters, or small dogs. Originally bred to perform a canine job of some sort, such as retrieving game for hunters or herding livestock, they have the stamina to put in a full workday. They need a significant amount of exercise and mental stimulation, and they’re more likely to spend time jumping, playing, and investigating any new sights and smells. When picking a breed, consider your own activity level and lifestyle, and think about whether you’ll find a frisky, energetic dog invigorating or annoying. Prince Albrecht zu Solms-Braunfeld of the Royal House of Hanover was credited with encouraging breeders to select early specimens on the basis of function rather than form. As the end of the war drew near, many breeders hid their gold, their diamonds, their artwork, their Lipizzaner stallions, and their German Shorthaired Pointers. But since Yugoslavia was behind the Iron Curtain after WW II, West German breeders didn’t have access to Germany’s finest GSPs and they were faced with rebuilding their beloved breed from a limited gene pool. Rick Bass wrote a book called Colter: The True Story of the Best Dog I Ever Had about living and hunting with a German Shorthair in Montana Sportswriter Mel Wallis wrote a book titled Run, Rainey, Run about his relationship with his intelligent and versatile hunting German Shorthaired Pointer. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills. Lymphedema: A disorder in which valvular blockage of lymph flow or twisted lymphatic ducts cause tissues to swell from an accumulation of fluids. However, it can be managed with treatments that include cauterizing or suturing injuries, transfusions of the von Willebrand factor before surgery, and avoiding certain medications.

The versatile, medium-sized German Shorthaired Pointer is an enthusiastic gundog of all trades who thrives on vigorous exercise, positive training, and a lot of love. GSP people call their aristocratic companions the “perfect pointer.”

The German Shorthaired Pointer (GSP) is a medium to large sized breed of pointing dog developed in the 19th century in Germany for hunting.[1] A versatile hunting breed, being an all-purpose gun dog suitable for both land and water,[2] they are streamlined yet powerful with strong legs. While a hunting breed that retains a strong drive to find and chase game, they are extremely energetic and can excel at a wide variety of dog sports. Their demeanor when well-socialized is friendly toward both people and fellow canines, with some tendency to be “velcro dogs”.

[1] A versatile hunting breed, being an all-purpose gun dog suitable for both land and water, [2] they are streamlined yet powerful with strong legs. While a hunting breed that retains a strong drive to find and chase game, they are extremely energetic and can excel at a wide variety of dog sports . Therefore, its temperament is that of an intelligent, bold, boisterous, eccentric, and characteristically affectionate dog that is cooperative and easily trained. These dogs love interaction with humans and are suitable pets for active families who will give them an outlet for their considerable energy. This need for exercise, coupled with the breed’s natural instinct to hunt, means that training is an absolute necessity. The GSP’s distinctly independent character means that any unused energy will likely result in the dog amusing itself, most probably in an undesirable manner. Failure by the owner to give this active and intelligent dog sufficient exercise and/or proper training can produce a German Shorthaired Pointer that appears hyperactive or that has destructive tendencies. Regular hunting , running , carting , bikejoring , skijoring , mushing , dog scootering or other vigorous activity can alleviate this desire to escape. German Shorthaired Pointers are proficient with many different types of game and sport, including trailing, retrieving, and pointing pheasant, quail, grouse, waterfowl, raccoons, possum, and even deer. liver & white patched (head) and ticked (body)German Shorthaired Pointers are usually healthy but they can get certain health conditions. Like many other deep-chested dogs, German shorthaired pointers are highly prone to gastric dilatation volvulus (GDV), also known as bloat. Some symptoms of GDV are: distended abdomen, excessive salivation, retching without throwing up, restlessness, depression, lethargy, and weakness. However, the GSP’s high levels of activity require the breed to drink considerable amounts of water to prevent dehydration. GSPs depicted in the 1915 book “Dogs of All Nations”German Hunters spent generations cross different breeds until the GSP came during the 1800s. [12] According to the American Kennel Club, [5] it is likely that the GSP is descended from a breed known as the German Bird Dog, which itself is related to the Old Spanish Pointer introduced to Germany in the 17th century. With their high intelligence and athleticism the German Shorthaired Pointer performs well in many AKC sports such as, Agility, Dock Diving, Obedience along with Service Dog work. Robert B. Parker ‘s most popular mystery series features a Boston detective known only as Spenser who has had a series of three solid-liver German Shorthairs, all named Pearl: one who stood with him during a bear charge in his rural youth; one given to his girlfriend by her ex-husband; and the third Pearl, to keep company with Spenser and his girlfriend in their late middle age. Author Parker appears on many of the Spenser dust jackets with a solid-liver GSP male identical to the three incarnations of Pearl in the series. Rick Bass ‘s ruminations on living and hunting with a German Shorthaired Pointer in Montana can be found in the book Colter: The True Story of the Best Dog I Ever Had . The 1978 film ” Days of Heaven ,” written and directed by Terrence Malick , features a brief scene of dogs hunting the prairie. ^ “2016 Winners” , westminsterkennelclub.org , Westminster Kennel Club “German Shorthaired Pointer Dog Breed Information and Pictures” .

German Shorthaired Pointer

German Shorthaired Pointer

Do you love a good romp through the woods? Wish you had someone to share it with? Meet the German shorthaired pointer—an absolute dream dog for any outdoor enthusiast and your new four-legged best friend.German shorthaired pointers (GSPs for short) are bright, friendly dogs who are always up for an adventure. This regal breed is easy to train, eager to please, and makes an excellent family dog. Because they’re so energetic, GSPs do best with an active family who loves to play and move as much as they do. If you give your German shorthaired pointer lots of love, affection, and playtime, he’ll reward you with an unbreakable family bond.These agile, athletic family dogs are also versatile hunting dogs. German shorthaired pointers can do it all in the field, from trailing and tracking to pointing and retrieving. If their humans aren’t up for hunting, no problem—GSPs are great at retrieving toys, too. They’re wonderful companions who love to fetch in the backyard with kids, join their pet parents for a morning jog, and go for a swim (those webbed feet come in handy!).

Appearance

German shorthaired pointers are medium-to-large dogs with good posture and a regal stance. Males reach a height of 23–25 inches and a weight of 55–70 pounds, while females clock in at 21–23 inches and 45–60 pounds.GSPs have a large brown nose, floppy ears, and dark, almond-shaped eyes. But it’s their unique markings and color combinations that make them one of the most recognizable breeds in the world. German shorthaired pointers can be solid in color, but more commonly their coats are liver and white or black and white with spots (referred to as “patches” or “ticking”). But one thing’s for sure: You’ll never find a black nose on a liver-colored dog (and vice versa)—a GSP’s nose always matches the color of his coat.This breed doesn’t need a ton of maintenance beyond regular brushing and the occasional bath. They need more frequent brushing during the shedding seasons to rid them of loose hairs, which can be difficult to remove from furniture and carpeting. But compared with other breeds, they’re considered very clean dogs and mild shedders.

Temperament

German shorthaired pointers are smart dogs, willing to please, and easy to get along with. They have lots of energy to burn and will let you know when they’re feeling playful. They’re active their whole lives—but from 6 months to 3 years old, this breed is particularly energetic and will need lots of activity and affection.GSPs have a high prey drive because of their hunting history, which means they’re wired to chase any small animal that crosses their path. A fenced yard and leashed walks are a must for this free-spirited breed. Your German shorthaired pointer is likely to wander off and do his own thing if he’s not trained to stay by your side. The good news? With a little patience and lots of positive reinforcement, these dogs are quick to learn.Kid-friendly and kind, GSPs get along with other dogs and are polite with most strangers. They love playing with children, but can be a little rambunctious at times—as with any dog, kids should be supervised during GSP playtime and be taught how to interact with pets. They won’t bark excessively, but theyAbove all, GSPs hate being bored. These working dogs were bred with a purpose and thrive on having a job to do. Left to his own devices, your playful pointer could become a daring escape artist on a mission to see what the rest of the neighborhood has to offer. Plenty of exercise, games, interactive toys, and puzzle feeders will keep his mind occupied.

Living Needs

German shorthaired pointers need room to run and play. Apartment life will not bode well with an energetic GSP in the mix. These dogs need an owner with an active lifestyle and ample space to accommodate their boundless energy.This breed craves purpose and structure, and without it they can begin chewing and barking. Their high energy levels—especially as puppies—can be hard for impatient or first-time owners to handle.German shorthaired pointers are sensitive dogs who need positive reinforcement and a stable living environment to thrive. They don’t like being left alone, so if you’re gone a lot, you may want to rethink owning a GSP. This breed needs patient humans with the dedication to stick through the puppy phase and keep these super-smart dogs occupied.German shorthaired pointers are high-performers when it comes to organized dog sports. But if you’re not into competitive agility training, your GSP will be more than happy to join your family on a camping trip or long hike.

Care

These dogs are easy to groom. You’ll need to trim their nails, check and clean their ears, and brush their coat with a groomer’s mitt or firm bristle brush once a week. They’ll also enjoy the occasional bath with mild shampoo—twice a year should be plenty for these dogs, who rely on natural oils to protect their skin. GSPs shed more in the spring and fall and need extra brushing during those seasons to keep them from leaving a trail of little loose hairs behind.These enthusiastic dogs thrive on tons of exercise and movement. “German shorthaired pointers are bred for hunting, which makes them very outgoing, high-energy dogs,” says Nicole Goudey-Rigger, owner and CEO of Pets a Go Go in Stamford, Conn. “They need so much exercise that they even make goldens and Labs look sluggish. Off-leash running and nose work are great ways for them to expend their energy.” Just make sure they’re trained to stick by your side before letting them off the leash!Because these dogs are so smart, they’re easy to train. Positive, encouraging methods early on are the key to success. Reward their good behavior with treats, praise, and play. These sensitive dogs only become defeated with harsh commands or inconsistent training.”German shorthaired pointers need a lot of socializing to build up their confidence,” Goudey-Rigger says. “Daily handling is important to get puppies used to being touched. As soon as the puppy has a couple of vaccines, they should be introduced to new people daily. You want them to get comfortable with new sights and sounds.”Feed your German shorthaired pointer dog food with high-quality ingredients. Check with your vet for information about how much and how often to feed your pup based on age, activity level, and individual needs.

Health

The German shorthaired pointer has a lifespan of 12–14 years and is typically a healthy dog.According to the German Shorthaired Pointer Club of America (GSPCA), potential health complications for this breed can include hip dysplasia, eye issues, and heart problems. GSPs are also prone to bloat (gastric dilation volvulus), which can be life-threatening. Owners of German shorthaired pointer puppies should talk to their veterinarian about what they can do to prevent GDV.Reputable German shorthaired pointer steer breeders will screen for health issues in your puppy. You can help your GSP steer clear of serious complications by scheduling regular check-ups and taking the advice of your veterinarian.

History

German breeders wanted one dog to “do it all,” so they spent generations perfecting this hunting dog in the 1700s and 1800s. While it’s hard to tell which breeds were combined to ultimately create the GSP, it’s likely that a combination of German bird dogs and Spanish pointers is behind this versatile and intelligent gundog, according to the GSPCA.Those early breeders did such a good job that even today GSPs are among the top-ranking hunting and tracking dogs. They’re sleek, speedy, and full of stamina. They’re prized for their keen sense of smell, their ability to retrieve waterfowl, and their courage to take on bigger animals like deer. The American Kennel Club recognized the GSP in 1930.

German Shorthaired Pointer

The versatile German Shorthaired Pointer sporting dog breed hunts many types of game, retrieves on land or from water, and is an affectionate companion. They have a striking, easy-care coat, but they need plenty of vigorous exercise.If you can provide this dog with the mental and physical challenges they crave, they’ll be your best four-legged friend. But those who live in apartments or spend lots of time away from home must beware. Without room to play and lots of exercise, you may find a bored dog engaging in destructive behaviors when you get home.DogTime recommendsSee all dog breed traits and facts about German Shorthaired Pointers below!

German Shorthaired Pointer Dog Breed Pictures

Vital Stats:

German Shorthaired Pointer

TheThe German Shorthaired Pointer has a short coat that comes in various combinations, generally a mix of liver and white. They have moderately long floppy ears set high on the head. Longer, broad, and strong, muzzles allow retrieval of heavier game. The dog’s profile should be straight or strongly Roman nosed; any dished appearance to the profile is incorrect according to breed standards.The German Shorthaired Pointer is a member of the Sporting Group.

Appearance[edit]

The German Shorthaired Pointer’s coat is short and flat with a dense undercoat protected by stiff guard hairs making the coat water resistant and allowing the dog to stay warm in cold weather. This allows the German Shorthaired Pointer to be an agile hunter with high performance in both field and water. The color can be a dark brown with some lighter brown colors, referred to as “liver” (incorrectly as “chocolate” or “chestnut”), black (although any area of black is cause for disqualification in American Kennel Club-sanctioned shows), white, liver roan, or liver and white.The GSP coat is easy to groom and take care of. Although their coat is short, they do shed. They shed more at certain times throughout the year. If that isn’t taken care of their hairs can be embedded in fabrics and carpet and it will be difficult to get it out. All it takes is to brush regularly with a firm bristle brush, along with baths when necessary.

Temperament[edit]

The temperament of dogs can be affected by different factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. The German Shorthaired Pointer was developed to be a dog suited for family life, as well as a versatile hunter. Therefore, its temperament is that of an intelligent, bold, boisterous, eccentric, and characteristically affectionate dog that is cooperative and easily trained. This breed is smart, friendly, willing, and enthusiastic. The GSP is usually good with children, although care should be taken because the breed can be boisterous especially when young. These dogs love interaction with humans and are suitable pets for active families who will give them an outlet for their considerable energy. The German Shorthaired Pointer needs plenty of vigorous activity and thrives with much exercise and running. This need for exercise, coupled with the breed’s natural instinct to hunt, means that training is an absolute necessity. The GSP’s distinctly independent character means that any unused energy will likely result in the dog amusing itself, most probably in an undesirable manner. Most German Shorthaired Pointers make excellent watchdogs, as they are naturally a very vocal dog. The breed generally gets along well with other dogs, but a strong hunting instinct is normal for the breed, which is not always good for other small pets such as cats or rabbits.Failure by the owner to give this active and intelligent dog sufficient exercise and/or proper training can produce a German Shorthaired Pointer that appears hyperactive or that has destructive tendencies. Thus, the breed is not a suitable pet for an inactive home or for inexperienced dog owners. Although these dogs form very strong attachments with their owners, a bored GSP that receives insufficient exercise may feel compelled to exercise himself. These dogs are athletic and can escape from four- to six-foot enclosures with little difficulty. Regular hunting, running, carting, bikejoring, skijoring, mushing, dog scootering or other vigorous activity can alleviate this desire to escape.Like the other German pointers (the German Wirehaired Pointer and the less well-known German Longhaired Pointer), the GSP can perform virtually all gun dog roles. It is pointer and retriever, an upland bird dog and water dog. The GSP can be used for hunting larger and more dangerous game. It is an excellent swimmer but also works well in rough terrain. It is tenacious, tireless, hardy, and reliable. German Shorthaired Pointers are proficient with many different types of game and sport, including trailing, retrieving, and pointing pheasant, quail, grouse, waterfowl, raccoons, possum, and even deer.

Health[edit]

German Shorthaired Pointers are usually healthy but they can get certain health conditions. There are things like cancer, Lymphedema, Entropion, Van Willebrand’s Disease, and Gastric dilation-volvulus (GDV). Some GSP are prone to epilepsy, hip dysplasia, and hermaphroditism. There are scans and test to verify vWD. When feeding a pup under 6 months they will need to be fed more than twice a day but once they reach adulthood they can be fed twice a day. Since German Shorthaired Pointer can bloat, they shouldn’t be fed immediately after running or other vigorous exercise. Once they have eaten, they shouldn’t run or exercise for at least an hour after eating and drinking.A genetic form of lupus, termed exfoliative cutaneous lupus erythematosus (ECLEMany factors, like genetics, environment, and diet can all contribute to hip dysplasia, which is a deformity of the hip joint. Not all German shorthaired pointers will develop displasia, but as the disease is determined by multi-genetic factors, only an OFA X-ray and screening by a qualified veterinary practitioner will determine whether the condition is present. No amount of exercise will correct it, and care should be taken to prevent slippage on smooth flooring. In severe cases, surgical correction may be required. Like many other deep-chested dogs, German shorthaired pointers are highly prone to gastric dilatation volvulus (GDV), also known as bloat. This is a life-threatening condition, requiring immediate veterinary treatment. GDV occurs especially if the dog is fed one large meal a day, eats rapidly, drinks large amounts of water after eating, or exercises vigorously after eating. In GDV, the stomach distends with gas or air and then twists (torsion), so that the dog is unable to rid the excess air in stomach through burping or vomiting. Also, the normal return of blood to the heart is impeded, causing a drop in blood pressure and the dog will go into shock. Without immediate medical attention, the dog may die. Some symptoms of GDV are: distended abdomen, excessive salivation, retching without throwing up, restlessness, depression, lethargy, and weakness. Precautions against GVD include: refraining from feeding immediately before or after exercise, feeding several smaller meals throughout the day instead of a single large meal, and avoiding the consumption of large amounts of water with dry food.As with any other hunting dog, contact with game can cause the spread of fungi and bacteria that can easily colonise in the gums or cause infections on open wounds and small cuts from scratching against plants and bushes during a regular hunting session.

Care[edit]

German Shorthaired Pointers along with other sporting dogs requires much exercise and space to run. GSPs are one of the most energetic breeds. Therefore, if not given the right amount of attention, they can become bored and destructive. GSPs do not do well left alone all day or if relegated to a kennel with little human interaction.GSPs are a very clean breed. The short GSP coat needs very little grooming, just occasional brushing. They typically shed constantly. GSPs should only be bathed when needed. Like all dogs with flop ears, GSP can be prone to ear infections and their ears require regular checking and cleaning.The GSP has a median lifespan of 9 years in a Danish survey and 12 years in a UK survey. In the UK survey about 1 in 8 lived to >15 years with the longest lived dog living to 17 years.As the GSP is a medium/large, active breed, the dogs can require considerable food. Older or less active GSPs can also become obese if fed more than suitable for the individual’s activity levels. A healthy weight should permit the last two ribs to be felt under the coat and the dog should have a distinct waist or “tuck-up”.Due to the short GSP coat, body heat management is not generally a problem. However, the GSP’s high levels of activity require the breed to drink considerable amounts of water to prevent dehydration. Early symptoms of dehydration show itself as thick saliva and urine with an excessively strong and distinct smell.

Training[edit]

Early training is important for German Shorthair Pointer. The first year of having a GSP, it is best to make sure that they know the basics before teaching them other things. When training them, it is best to keep the lessons short but entertaining because they can get easily distracted. It is best to make sure they get their exercise in and then try some training. They are an intelligent breed and will learn quickly. They have much energy and need to be taken out daily so that they can relieve some of the energy.

History[edit]

German Hunters spent generations cross different breeds until the GSP came during the 1800s. They were very successful to the point that they are among the top-winning breeds in competitive hunting events.

Current uses[edit]

German Shorthaired Pointer are well-mannered, obedient, and sometimes they are wary of children but they can be around them. They can survive outside in mild weather but they perform their best when kept inside the house with access to the outdoors. Early training is an important vital and they will learn quickly with consistent training sessions. They are playful and have much energy. German Shorthaired Pointers requires a great deal of physical and mental exercise. If they don’t get their daily exercise they become nervous and destructive. They have a strong bond with their family. When meeting other people they are careful and observant, but once they spend more time with them they slowly start to warm up to them. They also don’t like being alone very often and they get bored. When meeting other dogs they get along well, especially when they are similar size. German Shorthaired Pointers are still currently used as versatile hunting and gun dogs. With their high intelligence and athleticism the German Shorthaired Pointer performs well in many AKC sports such as, Agility, Dock Diving, Obedience along with Service Dog work.

In art and literature[edit]

Thomas Mann’s great love for his German Shorthaired is told in the bookRobert B. Parker’s most popular mystery series features a Boston detective known only as Spenser who has had a series of three solid-liver German Shorthairs, all named Pearl: one who stood with him during a bear charge in his rural youth; one given to his girlfriend by her ex-husband; and the third Pearl, to keep company with Spenser and his girlfriend in their late middle age. Author Parker appears on many of theRick Bass’s ruminations on living and hunting with a German Shorthaired Pointer in Montana can be found in the bookSportswriter Mel Ellis’ memoirThe 1978 film “Days of Heaven,” written and directed by Terrence Malick, features a brief scene of dogs hunting the prairie. The GSP shown is Jocko von Stolzhafen, twice GSP National Champion (Field) and perhaps the best GSP of his era. A year or so later Jocko vanished while running at a training camp, presumably stolen.The logo of the Westminster Kennel Club is a Pointer, not a German Shorthaired Pointer, though it is frequently mistaken for the latter.

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]