German Shepherd vs Husky?

The Husky of today still maintains that same resiliency and heroic work ethic and sits at number 12 out of 194 on the AKCs list of Americas favorite dogs.

The German Shepherd and Husky are both working breeds, but they come from two very different backgrounds. The German Shepherd is the AKCs 2nd most frequently registered breed, after the Labrador Retriever .

Early Huskies There he earned his keep as an all-around sled and companion dog for the roaming Chukchi people. Bred to pull loads for extended distances in frigid temperatures, the Husky played a vital role in the survival of his original creators. Due to the Chukchis isolation, the pureness of the Siberian Husky remained intact for generations.

The Husky breed also played a vital role in saving countless lives of the people of Nome, Alaska after a diphtheria epidemic in 1925. A sled team of Siberian Huskies ran 658 miles in under six days in order to deliver a lifesaving medicine to the townspeople. The German Shepherd is the larger of the two breeds, standing 22-26 inches tall and weighing between 50 and 90 pounds.

The German Shepherd has a lean and muscular build with keen eyes and erect ears. The Husky is more compact than the German Shepherd, with a more proportionately shaped body. They have erect ears, a long tail, and expressive eyes that are either blue, brown, or one of each.

Both the German Shepherd and the Husky make good family dogs as they do well with children and other pets. The German Shepherd, for example, requires consistent training , early socialization, and lots of family time as he becomes extremely bonded with his people. He will thrive when given doggy jobs to do around the house like helping with laundry or bringing in the newspaper or groceries.

And even though his ancestors worked all day alongside other dogs, they also learned fondness for their human families. So he becomes extremely bonded to his family, and struggles if left in an empty house for long periods. This is a breed who needs constant companionship and will be an excellent candidate for homes with other doggie siblings.

Luckily, both the German Shepherd and the Husky are intelligent breeds who are eager to please and enjoy family life. The Husky and the German Shepherd are both prone to boredom due to their high intelligence and work ethic. And, like all breeds, the German Shepherd and the Husky will need early socialization and obedience training to ensure they are happy and well-adjusted dogs.

Both the Husky and the German Shepherd are active breeds who need lots of exercise and mental stimulation to stay healthy and happy. On top of that they need free time to run and play in a securely fenced yard or dog park. The German Shepherd has a shorter lifespan than the Husky, living only 7-10 years.

He is also prone to more health issues than the Husky, including degenerative myelopathy, elbow dysplasia, and bloat. Of course, a healthy diet and lifestyle will also play a large role in both the Husky and the German Shepherds overall health. Experts suggest a high-quality dog food specified for your specific breeds age and size.

They also recommend making sure your dogs food has real meat within the first few ingredients and does not contain unnecessary additives like corn, soy, or wheat. Keeping your German Shepherd or Husky groomed will also help maintain his overall health. Luckily, both the German Shepherd and the Husky are naturally clean dogs.

He is playful, energetic, very patient with kids, and would be a good choice for young families on the move. However, make sure you have a flexible schedule or other dogs around to keep your Husky busy. On the other hand, if you are interested in an intelligent dog who is eager to please and can help out around the house, then the German Shepherd is for you.

This breed thrives on doggy jobs and loves to be a helpful part of his family unit. However, the German Shepherd has a shorter lifespan and is prone to a few more health issues than the Husky. Ackerman, The Genetic Connection; a Guide to Health Problems in Purebred Dogs, Second Edition, 2011.

What dog is stronger than a German shepherd?

From the differences in weight and height, the Rottweiler stands out. The largest male Rottweiler would be 45lb (20.4kg) heavier and 1ʺ (2.5cm) taller than the largest male German Shepherd. The Rottweiler also has a stronger dog bite force when compared to the German Shepherd.

The German Shepherd and the Siberian Husky are quite different. They are both working dogs but from different professions, and it is this that shapes their temperament and consequentially their needs. The Siberian Husky also requires a lot of time from his family, but mainly so that he can be exercised thoroughly and simply to be part of the pack.

Height 20-23.5 Inches Weight 35-65 Pounds Temperament Mischievous, Loyal, Loving Energy Very High Health Above Average Lifespan 12-14 Years Price $850-$1,500 Despite being the most popular military and police service canine choice across the world, he is also now a favored family pet.

The Siberian Husky is one of the most favored breeds by families.The Siberian Husky is one of the oldest dog breeds in the world, and he was developed by the Chukchi Tribe in Russia to haul light loads at a fast pace over vast expanses of icy terrain without tiring quickly. In 1925, a Siberian Husky called Balto led a pack of dogs during the most difficult stretch of a 658-mile journey while he carried a life-saving antidote to save hundreds of lives from a deadly outbreak of Diphtheria. The German Shepherd is much longer than he is tall, and this gives him his sleek and powerful appearance, whereas the Siberian Husky is more proportionate and compact in his shape.

They both have a fluffy double coat , which originally kept them warm in the cold German and Arctic environment; however, they have very different colorings. This is totally different from the Husky, who is a sociable pooch who loves every family member equally, as well as any stranger or passersby. Mishka was a famous Husky, who went viral on the internet when her parents filmed her talking on camera, and mimicked words such as I love you.

The Husky is much more independent and stubborn , and as such he does not enjoy training or bonding sessions as much as the German Shepherd and would much rather just get stuck into family playtime and show off his silly antics. The German Shepherd is a medium energy dog and requires under 60 minutes of exercise a day to keep him fit, healthy and occupied. The German Shepherd would prefer to partake in an intense activity that is going to get his brain working, such as agility courses, or playing fetch and frisbee.

The Husky, however, is a high-energy dog who needs at least 90 minutes of exercise a day and would prefer long and brisk walks, and he makes for an excellent jogging partner. His trainability is one of the main reasons why he is used in protection services, drug detection roles, as well as being utilized in search and rescue operations. The Siberian Husky, on the other hand, while he is intelligent, is independent and would rather be playing than training, so you should not expect him to fetch your morning newspaper or retrieve your slippers, unlike the German Shepherd.

The German Shepherd is a natural protector and as such socialization will help to control his guarding tendencies, and to ensure that he does not become overprotective of his family or estate. Both dogs are considerably healthy, but the Husky can outlive a GSD.The German Shepherd National Breed Club recommends testing for Elbow andHip Dysplasia . The right dog food for your Husky will be largely a personal choice, as long as it meets nutritional requirements based on age range.

Expect to spend $1,000 or more on either breed as a puppy.Both the German Shepherd and the Siberian Husky cost, on average, $1,000 and up from a reputable breeder. If you are still undecided between these two breeds then you could always consider a German Shepherd and Siberian Husky crossed pup , also known as a Gerberian Shepsky .

Dogs are a long-term commitment, so dont let those puppy eyes melt your heart before you do some serious research into which breed best fits your lifestyle.

To fully understand how the two breeds compare, well review their appearance, temperament, training and grooming needs, and overall health. On the other hand, German Shepherds have long, lean, muscular bodies prime for demanding jobs.

This strapping breed is noteworthy for its tall, erect ears, long snout and distinct athletic prowess. As a whole, Huskies tend to be much smaller than German Shepherds with more compact bodies and fluffier coats. If left alone for too long, theyre prone to separation anxiety so make sure they get plenty of time with others, whether thats people or other pets.

The breed is highly intelligent and easy to train, which is why they are so often used as rescue, police and guide dogs. Because of their backgrounds as working dogs, both German Shepherds and Huskies require a great deal of exercise. Huskies are generally more energetic, needing long runs multiple times a day, while the German Shepherd is content with a couple of shorter walks.

Weve heard many people give their Husky the nickname Houdini for their ability to escape. They are extremely loyal to their family, but they tend to be suspicious of strangers, which is why they make excellent guard dogs. Similar to the Husky, if left to their own devices, especially when young, the German Shepherd may become destructive.

Both Huskies and German Shepherds, if properly conditioned, can live harmoniously with children and other pets. Whichever breed you choose, socialize your puppy early and often to ensure they acclimate to their environment. As far as common health issues go, Huskies can have eye diseases and problems later in life, including cataracts, progressive retinal atrophy and corneal dystrophy.

With both breeds, proper screenings from a vet early in life will help you prepare for and mitigate any health issues that could come up. They can be faithful, loyal, loving companions if given the proper exercise, discipline and affection. Do your research and think hard about which one best suits you, and the feeling of bringing home that adorable new puppy will be even sweeter when you do!

When youre looking for a dog but dont know what breed to get, these nine easy questions can help quickly narrow down your search and find a four-legged friend who perfectly fits your lifestyle. Fortunately, in the German Shepherd vs Husky debate, both are great family dogs in different ways. Also, certain dogs, including both the German Shepherd and Husky, need space and a yard to run and exercise.

Potential pup parents should always make sure they have the time, energy and resources to care for a dog, no matter what the breed. In comparison, the German Shepherd is more reserved yet deeply loyal to family and very easy to train. Cost is a consideration, and its always a good idea to understand the full picture before making a commitment.

Undoubtedly because of its handsome, wolf-like appearance, the Siberian Husky is quickly gaining popularity both as a working dog and a household pet. Even so, it hasnt quite yet to reach the same popularity level as the German Shepherd breed. If youre looking for an athletic and loyal companion, however, these two breeds are excellent options.

When youre looking for an active companion or working dog, the German Shepherd and Siberian Husky are likely going to be among your top choices. Its easy to tell the Siberian Husky and the German Shepherd apart because of their vastly different appearance.

On the other hand, Huskies are mostly agouti (multi-colored banded hair), gray, black, red, sable, and white. Both have dense undercoats, but the Huskys outer hair tends to be fluffier, while the GSDs is more coarse and fuzzy. Although GSDs are also remarkably strong and agile, they work best using their intelligence, drive, and natural tracking abilities.

Considering their heritage as herding dogs, its no surprise that German Shepherds can run pretty fast, reaching top speeds of about 30 miles per hour. Because of their larger frames, both the German Shepherd and the Siberian Husky are at higher risk of bone and joint conditions like elbow and hip dysplasia. Other than bone and joint issues, Huskies are generally more prone to poor eye health.

Although eye health is not a common concern for GSDs, these dogs are more prone to digestive issues. However, individual dogs commonly surpass these numbers and live way beyond their breeds life expectancy. Among the most critical factors that contribute to a long life are diet, regular exercise, general health and well-being, and genetics.

Just check out Shada the Husky who lived way past 17 years old despite being unwanted by her first owner. GSDs rank 3rd overall and belong to the top tier of working dogs, along with breeds like the Border Collie and the Poodle. On the other hand, the Siberian Husky ranks 78th overall and belongs to the fourth tier of working dogs.

Grooming requirements are generally the same between the two breeds in terms of bathing, ear cleaning, nail cutting, and toothbrushing. Both the German Shepherd and the Siberian Husky have dense undercoats and thick top hairs. Note that just because their breeds are known to tolerate harsh climates, it doesnt mean that every dog will thrive in those conditions.

Thats enough for the breed to be included in restrictions set by local laws and even private rules by property owners and insurance companies. The cost of German Shepherds and Siberian Huskies can vary greatly and is typically determined by several factors. These include the bloodline, breeders reputation, conformity to AKC breed standards, and special colors or markings.

The even temperament and affectionate nature of both the German Shepherd and the Siberian Husky make them each a delight to own. The reality is either dog can be a great choice as long as you are willing to put time into training, socialization and developing a bond with your new furry friend. The physical characteristics, general temperament, and maintenance requirements of each breed will help you determine which one is better suited to your personality and lifestyle.

German Shepherd Vs Husky History

The German Shepherd and Husky are both working breeds, but they come from two very different backgrounds.

The First German Shepherd Dogs

The German Shepherd hails from Germany, where he was originally bred as a herding dog.It took 35 years to refine the German Shepherd breed.Today he works as a police dog, military dog, search and rescue dog, and service dog, amongst many other canine professions.The German Shepherd is the AKC’s 2nd most frequently registered breed, after the Labrador Retriever.

Early Huskies

The Siberian Husky, on the other hand, was refined in Siberia.There he earned his keep as an all-around sled and companion dog for the roaming Chukchi people.Bred to pull loads for extended distances in frigid temperatures, the Husky played a vital role in the survival of his original creators.Due to the Chukchi’s isolation, the pureness of the Siberian Husky remained intact for generations.The Husky breed also played a vital role in saving countless lives of the people of Nome, Alaska after a diphtheria epidemic in 1925.A sled team of Siberian Huskies ran 658 miles in under six days in order to deliver a lifesaving medicine to the townspeople.The Husky of today still maintains that same resiliency and heroic work ethic and sits at number 12 out of 194 on the AKC’s list of America’s favorite dogs.

German Shepherd Vs Husky Appearance

Both the German Shepherd and the Husky are handsome dogs.And both of them have distinct looks that set them apart.The German Shepherd is the larger of the two breeds, standing 22-26 inches tall and weighing between 50 and 90 pounds.But the Siberian Husky isn’t far behind.They stand approximately 20-23.5 inches tall and weigh between 35 and 50 pounds.

How Does the Husky Compare?

The German Shepherd and the Husky have remarkably similar coats.Both coats are weather resistant and double-layered.And they both shed profusely during shedding season.Still, it is not difficult to tell a German Shepherd and a Husky apart.The German Shepherd has a lean and muscular build with keen eyes and erect ears.Their fur comes in six colors:The Husky is more compact than the German Shepherd, with a more proportionately shaped body.They have erect ears, a long tail, and expressive eyes that are either blue, brown, or one of each.The Husky’s coat comes in 13 color varieties:

German Shepherd Vs Husky Training

Luckily, both the German Shepherd and the Husky are intelligent breeds who are eager to please and enjoy family life.However, the Husky is an independent thinker.He tends to only follow commands which he sees the benefit in, so he demands patience when it comes to training.The German Shepherd, on the other hand, highly enjoys learning new things and will actually thrive when given jobs to do.The Husky and the German Shepherd are both prone to boredom due to their high intelligence and work ethic.Bored dogs can become frustrated, and destructive.And, like all breeds, the German Shepherd and the Husky will need early socialization and obedience training to ensure they are happy and well-adjusted dogs.Experts always encourage positive reinforcement training, meaning treats and lots of praise instead of scolding and punishments.

German Shepherd Vs Husky Exercise

Both the Husky and the German Shepherd are active breeds who need lots of exercise and mental stimulation to stay healthy and happy.The Husky is a bit more energetic than the German Shepherd.He may require more time and maintenance when it comes to an exercise routine.Still, both of these breeds will need at least an hour or two of exercise every day.On top of that they need free time to run and play in a securely fenced yard or dog park.

German Shepherd Vs Husky Health

When comparing the health of these two breeds, it looks like the Husky is the healthiest.

German Shepherd Health

With a lifespan of 12-14 years, the Husky is most prone toThe AKC recommends early health screening for the breed, including a hip evaluation and an ophthalmologist evaluation.

Husky vs German Shepherd Grooming

Keeping your German Shepherd or Husky groomed will also help maintain his overall health.Luckily, both the German Shepherd and the Husky are naturally clean dogs.Brush them with a suitable brush once or twice a week and give them an occasional bath.You will also want to keep their nails trimmed and their ears and teeth cleaned to keep infection at bay.

Adopting a German Shepherd or Husky Dog

If the possibility of health issues is deterring you from getting one of these breeds, you may want to consider adopting an adult dog whose overall health is already known.To learn more about adopting a dog from a shelter, visit us here!

More Breed Comparisons

If you’ve loved learning about the differences between these two breeds, we’ve got plenty of others for you to take a look at!Click the links below:

Temperament

This is where the German Shepherd and the Siberian Husky differ the most. The German Shepherd is more of aThis is totally different from the Husky, who is aBecause the German Shepherd is one of the best guard dogs in town, he will let you know immediately if there is someone, or something, lurking that he doesn’t like the look of. The Husky, on the other hand, rarely barks, but he is a veryDespite their differences, they both make for aThe German Shepherd needs a firm master and one who will reward him with love and praise. He also needs to be worked, both physically and mentally, particularly through training sessions. He also feels much more comfortable following aThe Husky, on the other hand, needs much moreSimilarly, they both need to be with their family for the majority of the day, and neither likes to be left on their own for very long. They are both known to suffer from

Exercise

The German Shepherd requires less exercise than the Siberian Husky, more so than most people would think. The German Shepherd is aThe Husky, however, is aThey are both known to

Training

The German Shepherd isThe Siberian Husky, on the other hand, while he is intelligent, isHowever, they both need aIt is, of course, important to

Health

The German Shepherd National Breed Club recommends testing forThe German Shepherd, despite not being on the recommended test list, is also more prone to suffer fromThe Siberian Husky National Breed Club suggests that he should be tested for Hip Dysplasia as described above, but also forThey are both

Nutrition

The German Shepherd and the Siberian Husky will require approximately the same amount of food, at aroundA low-calorie diet will be better suited to dogs who suffer from joint dysplasia, particularly the German Shepherd as he suffers from both elbow and hip abnormalities, as this can help to prevent joint issues. If in any doubt,

Grooming

Both the German Shepherd and the Siberian Husky haveDuring the Husky’s shedding season they will most certainly need brushing every day. The same goes for the German Shepherd. This not only keeps their coat healthy but also keeps it manageable for both your sanity and the cleanliness of your household.The German Shepherd should be bathed once every 8 weeks or so, whereas the Husky is known to be a

Puppy Price

Both the German Shepherd and the Siberian Husky cost, on average,As mentioned earlier, both of these guys share the fact that they require a particular type of family who can offer them what they need, and often people welcome these guys into their home not knowing exactly what their needs are, and as such, they often find themselves in rehoming centers.The American German Shepherd Rescue Association lists dedicated rescue centers state by state if you wish to adopt a German Shepherd. The Siberian Husky Club of America Trust also lists dedicated rescue centers if you wish to adopt a Siberian Husky.

German Shepherd vs Husky

To fully understand how the two breeds compare, we’ll review their appearance, temperament, training and grooming needs, and overall health.This will give you a full picture of the German Shepherd vs Husky.

Appearance

As far as appearance goes, the Husky stands out for its medium-length, bushy coat and pointy ears. They’re also known for having beautiful, striking eyes that can often be different from one another in color.The breed comes in many different colors, ranging from sable to grey to black and white.On the other hand, German Shepherds have long, lean, muscular bodies prime for demanding jobs.This strapping breed is noteworthy for its tall, erect ears, long snout and distinct athletic prowess. These dogs can be one of 13 different colors.As a whole, Huskies tend to be much smaller than German Shepherds with more compact bodies and fluffier coats. On average they stand just under 2 feet tall and weigh 44-59 lbs for males and 35-38 lbs for females.German Shepherds are larger, weighing anywhere from 75-100 pounds and standing over 2 feet tall.

Temperament

The German Shepherd vs Siberian Husky temperament involves several tradeoffs.Siberian Huskies are extremely friendly and love to meet new people. They also have a bit of a mischievous side – which can be good and bad!Huskies also require a lot of exercise otherwise they will get bored and potentially destructive. You’ll have to make sure you give them the proper attention and play time they need.Also, the breed isn’t a big barker, but they can howl at times. If left alone for too long, they’re prone to separation anxiety so make sure they get plenty of time with others, whether that’s people or other pets.German Shepherds, on the other hand, are pure people pleasers. Give them a task to do and they’ll be in their element.The breed is highly intelligent and easy to train, which is why they are so often used as rescue, police and guide dogs.One key difference is that the German Shepherd isn’t as open with its affection. They have a bit of an aloof personality at first until they get to know someone.Once they bond with a person, however, they are loyal for life. This breed develops an incredibly deep connection with their owner and family.Because of their backgrounds as working dogs, both German Shepherds and Huskies require a great deal of exercise. Huskies are generally more energetic, needing long runs multiple times a day, while the German Shepherd is content with a couple of shorter walks.

Training

Highly intelligent and headstrong, the Husky needs proper training to reach their full potential. It’s said the best Husky owners are ones who act as the alpha and are clearly in charge.Notably, Huskies have an overwhelming desire to run. We’ve heard many people give their Husky the nickname “Houdini” for their ability to escape. Because of this, Huskies should always be properly secured. (There’s no going off the leash for this breed!)In comparison, the German Shepherd is one of the easiest dog breeds to train. Because of this, they are often in service jobs.They are extremely loyal to their family, but they tend to be suspicious of strangers, which is why they make excellent guard dogs.Similar to the Husky, if left to their own devices, especially when young, the German Shepherd may become destructive. This is why chew toys and plenty of exercise are so important.Both Huskies and German Shepherds, if properly conditioned, can live harmoniously with children and other pets.Whichever breed you choose, socialize your puppy early and often to ensure they acclimate to their environment.

Grooming

Both breeds shed, but there is no competition in the Husky vs German Shepherd shedding war.Huskies tend to shed in the spring and autumn, but German Shepherds shed year-round – a LOT. So get yourself a powerful vacuum while you’re at it. (The breed has even earned the nickname the German Shedder!)Due to their thick coats, both of these dogs need to be brushed at least twice a week to keep their coats shiny and healthy. Since they are naturally pretty clean and odor free, they only require the occasional bath.As with all dog breeds, they need their nails trimmed regularly, too.

Health

The German Shepherd vs. Husky life expectancy is slightly different. Huskies tend to live between 12-15 years while German Shepherds live around 9-13 years.One of the most important ways to keep your dog healthy is to feed it properly. The best way to go for both of these breeds is a high-quality diet with few additives that’s tailored to their size.As far as common health issues go, Huskies can have eye diseases and problems later in life, including cataracts, progressive retinal atrophy and corneal dystrophy.The Husky is also prone to hip dysplasia, as is the German Shepherd. The German Shepherd can also face elbow dysplasia. (Dysplasia is when limbs pop out of their sockets due to wear and tear on the joints.)Other common ailments for the German Shepherd include bloat and epilepsy.With both breeds, proper screenings from a vet early in life will help you prepare for and mitigate any health issues that could come up.

German Shepherd vs Husky: Conclusion

Both Huskies and German Shepherds are wonderful dogs to have in your life. They can be faithful, loyal, loving companions if given the proper exercise, discipline and affection.Do your research and think hard about which one best suits you, and the feeling of bringing home that adorable new puppy will be even sweeter when you do!

Why Do You Want a Dog?

First things first, let’s talk about why you want a dog. This will guide you more than you realize!For example, do you love cuddling up on the couch and want a furball to curl up in your lap and keep you company? Or do you want an energetic and enthusiastic dog who fits your active lifestyle?Stop for a minute, close your eyes and think about it.

Do You Have Any Allergies?

Dogs can be awful for allergies. But fortunately, there are many hypoallergenic dog breeds that make it easier for allergies sufferers.Always learn more about the breed before bringing it into your home.

Who’s in Your Household?

Another important thing to think about is who is in your household.Is it just you? Or do you have a partner? Roommates? Children?This is incredibly important to consider. Especially if you have little ones in the household.Fortunately, in the German Shepherd vs Husky debate, both are great family dogs in different ways.

Where Do You Live?

As you think about which dog breed is right for you, where you live is incredibly important.It goes without saying that certain breeds just aren’t cut out for small spaces. For example, a Great Dane in a tiny apartment would be a disaster!Also, certain dogs, including both the German Shepherd and Husky, need space and a yard to run and exercise.

What is the Dog’s Temperament?

Just like appearance, a pup’s temperament can vary greatly by breed. And it’s absolutely critical to find out how a dog will act based on their breed instincts.Both the Husky and German Shepherd have great personalities. The Husky is more outgoing yet a little more headstrong and mischievous. In comparison, the German Shepherd is more reserved yet deeply loyal to family and very easy to train.

How Much Does the Breed Cost?

Owning a dog isn’t cheap, but some breeds are more expensive than others. Especially for some of the rarer canines.Cost is a consideration, and it’s always a good idea to understand the full picture before making a commitment.Things to consider include the initial expense, vet bills, food, grooming and other expenses like daycare or boarding.

German Shepherd vs Husky

Undoubtedly because of its handsome, wolf-like appearance, the Siberian Husky is quickly gaining popularity both as a working dog and a household pet. Even so, it hasn’t quite yet to reach the same popularity level as the German Shepherd breed. If you’re looking for an athletic and loyal companion, however, these two breeds are excellent options.This article will explain the key difference between the German Shepherd vs Husky so you can decide which breed is the best for you and your family.

Why Compare German Shepherds and Huskies

When you’re looking for an active companion or working dog, the German Shepherd and Siberian Husky are likely going to be among your top choices.Although both are energetic and eager to please, they differ in so many ways. If you’re choosing between the two, it’s important for you to consider those differences in order to make the right decision.

German Shepherd vs Husky: Points of Comparison

It’s easy to tell the Siberian Husky and the German Shepherd apart because of their vastly different appearance. But those differences don’t just affect the way they look, but also the way they need to be cared for.Additionally, the personalities and physical abilities between the two breeds differ in many different ways. When you’re choosing between a Husky and a German Shepherd, consider the following points of comparison:

German Shepherd vs Husky Size

Huskies and German Shepherds are commonly referred to as large dogs. In reality, only the GSD is a “Large” breed while the Husky is technically only a “Medium” dog.Huskies often seem larger than they are because of their thick coats. Although they grow almost as tall as GSDs, they’re not as solidly built and so they weigh much less.

German Shepherd vs Husky Appearance

The most obvious difference between the German Shepherd and the Siberian Husky is their coats.German Shepherds are most commonly black & tan but also come in solid black, while, blue, gray, and liver as well as sable and a combination of black and cream, red, or silver. On the other hand, Huskies are mostly agouti (multi-colored banded hair), gray, black, red, sable, and white.Apart from color, their coats are also different in terms of texture. Both have dense undercoats, but the Husky’s outer hair tends to be fluffier, while the GSD’s is more coarse and fuzzy.In terms of similarities, both have the same noble stature and confident gait. They both also have distinctly erect ears and bushy tails.

German Shepherd vs Husky Strength

Both German Shepherds and Siberian Huskies are incredibly strong dogs. Because of their protection roles and police work, GSDs are recognized for their bite strength.However, Huskies actually have a bite force of 320 psi, which is considerably stronger than the GSD’s 238 psi. But unless you’re looking to get a dog for personal protection, that probably isn’t going to matter much.What’s essential to note about these dogs’ strength is that GSDs were bred for herding while Huskies were bred mainly for sledding. With the right equipment, Huskies can pull heavy loads and show incredible endurance.Although GSDs are also remarkably strong and agile, they work best using their intelligence, drive, and natural tracking abilities.

German Shepherd vs Husky Speed

Considering their heritage as herding dogs, it’s no surprise that German Shepherds can run pretty fast, reaching top speeds of about 30 miles per hour. As carting and sledding dogs, you’d think that Siberian Huskies would run much faster, but they actually run a little more slowly at 28 miles per hour.Where Huskies excel over GSDs is their unbelievable endurance. In fact, a Husky sledding team running at an average speed of 10 miles per hour can cover up to 150 miles in a single day.

German Shepherd vs Husky Health

Because of their larger frames, both the German Shepherd and the Siberian Husky are at higher risk of bone and joint conditions like elbow and hip dysplasia.To maintain a good quality breed stock, the German Shepherd Dog Club of America (GSDCA) requires elbow and hip evaluations by the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA). The Siberian Husky Dog Club of America (SCHA) requires the same OFA evaluation or an equivalent OVC or PennHIP evaluation.Other than bone and joint issues, Huskies are generally more prone to poor eye health. To combat the prevalence of corneal dystrophy, juvenile cataracts, and progressive retinal atrophy in the breed, the SCHA requires annual eye examinations for all adults to be used as breeding stock.The results of these examinations must be registered with the Companion Animal Eye Registry through OFA (CAER) and the Siberian Husky Ophthalmic Registry (SHOR).Although eye health is not a common concern for GSDs, these dogs are more prone to digestive issues. Mild to severe bloating is common to this breed, as well as several other gastric problems. Their sensitive stomachs can lead to frequent runny stools, gas, and vomiting.

GSD vs Husky

According to the American Kennel Club, the German Shepherd has an average lifespan of 7 to 10 years, while the Siberian Husky’s is about 12 to 14 years. However, individual dogs commonly surpass these numbers and live way beyond their breed’s life expectancy. Among the most critical factors that contribute to a long life are diet, regular exercise, general health and well-being, and genetics.Sometimes, resilience is the only factor needed for a long life. Just check out Shada the Husky who lived way past 17 years old despite being unwanted by her first owner. Thankfully, she was adopted into a new home and lived a much better life in her golden days.

GSD vs Husky Temperament

Huskies have shown that they are just as loyal and affectionate as GSDs. They’re both confident and outgoing, and are both very vocal breeds. Between the two, Huskies are more prone to mischief, while GSDs are more likely to be aloof.Both the GSD and Husky dislike irregularity. They thrive on daily routines and dislike frequent guests. GSDs, however, are better with strangers than Huskies. In terms of sharing their home, GSDs are better with children and cats while Huskies are better with other dogs.Nevertheless, most Huskies would prefer being the only pet at home. Despite these predispositions, however, both do very well in practically all situations as long as they’re socialized properly and at an early age.

German Shepherd vs Husky Trainability

Both the Siberian Husky and the German Shepherd are generally regarded as smart breeds. However, a study on the intelligence of dogs shows that GSDs are significantly more intelligent than Huskies.GSDs rank 3rd overall and belong to the top tier of working dogs, along with breeds like the Border Collie and the Poodle. This means they can learn a new command within five seconds and will obey that same command at least 95% of the time.On the other hand, the Siberian Husky ranks 78th overall and belongs to the fourth tier of working dogs. They share this tier with other popular workers like the Australian Shepherd and the Irish Wolfhound. Dogs in this tier generally need 25 to 40 repetitions before learning a new command, which they will obey at least 50% of the time.

Type of Work

Based on the AKC dog breed classifications, the German Shepherd forms part of the Herding Group while the Siberian Husky falls under the Working Group.Although both are workers, herders like the German Shepherd are generally better able to do specialized work. They are trainable to a very high level and are able to make independent decisions.Additionally, they have tons of energy and are able to work closely as well as collaboratively with humans. Generally, they’re better than Huskies at being service dogs and therapy dogs. They’re also better at detection and search & rescue.On the other hand, workers like the Siberian Husky aren’t as suited for specialized work. They’re often used for their incredible stamina and endurance, as well as their imposing stature. They are trained to assist humans in activities like pulling carts and sleds as well as protecting flocks.

Grooming differences: Huskies and German Shepherds

Grooming requirements are generally the same between the two breeds in terms of bathing, ear cleaning, nail cutting, and toothbrushing. Where they differ significantly is in coat maintenance. Although they are both known for shedding, their shedding patterns are different.Both the German Shepherd and the Siberian Husky have dense undercoats and thick top hairs. They both will blow their undercoats twice a year. During this time, they will shed so heavily that they will require daily brushing with a de-shedder tool.If you want to see what that might be like, check out this shedding GSD getting a good brushing:If you thought that was a lot of fur, check out this shedding Husky:Although the two breeds shed similarly when they blow their coats in the fall and spring, they shed differently throughout the year.Huskies don’t really shed much hair outside of their shedding seasons. It’s generally enough to brush them once a week. On the other hand, German Shepherds shed throughout the year. They will benefit from more frequent brushing of twice or even three times a week.

Living Conditions Required

Both the Husky and the GSD are highly adaptable breeds. Both thrive in cooler climates but can live happily in warmer areas as well. Because of their Siberian ancestry, it’s no surprise that Huskies can withstand much colder temperatures than the GSD.In fact, they can tolerate temperatures as low as -60°F (-51°C) while, just like most dogs, temperatures of 40°F (4.44°C) might already be too cold for German Shepherds. On the other hand, GSDs can tolerate warmer temperatures than Huskies.Note that just because their breeds are known to tolerate harsh climates, it doesn’t mean that every dog will thrive in those conditions. Your dog will need time to acclimatize when they’re subjected to temperatures they’re not used to.In terms of living space, both breeds will benefit from large spaces where they can run freely. Nevertheless, they could still thrive as apartment dogs as long as they get plenty of opportunities to go outside and use up all their energy.

GSD vs Husky Exercise Requirement

German Shepherds and Siberian Huskies are both incredibly energetic. Without plenty of opportunities to use up their energy, they easily become bored and more likely to develop some unwanted behaviors. Remember that these are working breeds, so they’re happiest when they’re performing a function.According to the PSDA, German Shepherds and Siberian Huskies should get at least 2 hours of exercise per day. Many companion dogs, however, are happy enough with 1 hour of daily physical exertion.You’ll really need to observe your own dog and determine how much and what type of exercise they need on a daily basis. In addition, both breeds, but most especially the GSD, need the additional mental stimulation because of their intelligent nature.

AKC Recognition

Both the German Shepherd and the Siberian Husky are recognized by the American Kennel Club. In fact, they are among the most popular breeds that compete in their shows and sporting competitions.However, the GSD is much more popular at #2 out of 196 breeds, ranking just below the Labrador and above the Golden Retriever. The Husky ranks at #15 below Boxers and above Cavalier King Charles Spaniels.

Breed Restrictions

Although the Husky isn’t reputed for aggression, US dog bite statistics show that it makes up 3% of all fatal dog attacks between 2005 and 2017. That’s enough for the breed to be included in restrictions set by local laws and even private rules by property owners and insurance companies.Nevertheless, the German Shepherd appears on more breed restriction lists than the Siberian Husky. It’s important that you check with your city, community, landlord, and insurance provider before you take in any of these two breeds.

German Shepherd vs Husky Costs

The cost of German Shepherds and Siberian Huskies can vary greatly and is typically determined by several factors. These include the bloodline, breeder’s reputation, conformity to AKC breed standards, and special colors or markings.Buying a German Shepherd will cost you anywhere between $450 and $1,900 while Siberian Huskies are generally less expensive at $400 to $1,200.The first year of dog ownership is typically the most expensive, especially if you get your dog as a puppy. Veterinary expenses, training costs, and supplies in the first year will cost approximately $3,815 for a GSD and about $3,575 for a Husky.To keep your dog happy and healthy, you’ll spend about $147 per month on a GSD and about $125 per month on a Husky. The slight difference in monthly costs is driven mostly by the difference in food consumption.

Which Breed is Best for You?

The even temperament and affectionate nature of both the German Shepherd and the Siberian Husky make them each a delight to own. However, the more superior intelligence of the GSD makes them better suited for a number of working roles. They’re also immensely fulfilling to train and engage in various activities with.On the other hand, Huskies are less expensive to own. They’re also much better companions if you often engage in outdoor activities in colder areas. Their longer life expectancy could mean that you will likely enjoy their company for longer.The reality is either dog can be a great choice as long as you are willing to put time into training, socialization and developing a bond with your new furry friend.