German Shepherd Mastiff Mix?

Harley the English Mastiff and German Shepherd mix at 2 1/2 years old”Harley’s mom was a purebred German Shepherd, weighing approximately 75 lbs. His father was a purebred Mastiff, weighing approximately 180 lbs. He is now 2.5 years old, weighing approximately 150 lbs and still growing! He stands 6 ft. tall on his hind legs. He is a wonderful dog. He has an amazing temperament. He’s very laid back and so gentle with our small children. He lays on his side patiently if the baby approaches him with his favorite toy… even though he would love to play. He dismisses the toy completely and licks fingers and toes and loves to be the jungle gym. Otherwise, he likes to lay near the children during group play and just be near them. If they are playing outside, he patrols the perimeter of the yard and redirects children who get too close to the perimeter by walking in front of them until they forget where they are going and turn around LOL. He loves to lounge around, but when he gets outside he loves tug of war, playing with tennis balls and big tree branches! But his favorite toy is the laser pointer. He is very intelligent. When I was pregnant he would always lick my belly. Any time I am sick in the bathroom, he comes and lays his head on my lap until I am done, and then he licks my tears away 🙂 same for the kids. He is such a sweet boy. On top of all of this, he is so alert to his surroundings. And if an “intruder” shows up to the house while I am away, he makes it clear they aren’t welcome. (We had our friend test this theory gladly and we were all pleased with the result!) He is our most beloved pet. He is active enough to play but not too demanding and destructive. He loves to snuggle but is also very independent, alert but does not bark incessantly, great natural protective instincts but not overzealous and knows when to protect and when to let the alphas be in charge. He is a definite gentle guardian over small children and even the cat and chickens. He has a pretty low prey drive also… he would do perimeter patrols around our free range chickens to keep them in our yard, and the closest thing to bothering them would be to occasionally trot through the flock to watch them scatter before rounding them all up in a group again LOL! Not to mention he just looks cool as hell 🙂 I’m not worried about intruders.”

Are mastiff mixes good dogs?

The St. Bernard Mastiff mix dogs are excellent watchdogs with an innate loyalty to their owners. They also have a calm disposition. The St. Bernard Mastiff mix puppies weigh about 50-60 pounds.

What is the best German shepherd mix breed?

Golden Shepherd. Parents: Golden Retriever x German Shepherd mix. ….Shug. Parents: Pug x German Shepherd mix. ….Chow Shepherd. Parents: Chow Chow x German Shepherd mix. ….Labrashepherd. Parents: Labrador x German Shepherd mix. ….Gerberian Shepsky. ….Corman Shepherd. ….Shepweiler. ….Shepadoodle.

Are German shepherd mixes aggressive?

Yet some combinations may not prove to be too ideal for families with small children, because the hybrid German Shepherd mix may turn out to be aggressive and dominant. … The hybrid dogs may turn out to be too shy or too aggressive. The Alaskan Malamute is an independent, stubborn and aggressive dog.

Chances are that youve considered adopting a Mastiff Shepherd cross for its reputation historically as a stalwart guardian and for its heft. Or, youre looking for a guard dog that needs very little maintenance and upkeep to remain healthy and happy.

Brindle coat colors are also a possibility; usually this will happen if you have an English or Neapolitan Mastiff German Shepherd mix. The following section details practical and applicable information about Mastiff Shepherds for dog owners looking to adopt this large breed.

A German Shepherd Mastiff mix full grown dogs life expectancy is 8 12 years. Insufficient exercise and a poor diet may worsen the joints, which can negatively impact your Mastiff Shepherds quality of life. Symptoms include weakness in the hind or front leg areas, avoiding exercise, and displays of aggressive behavior from your Mastiff Shepherd when touching the affected joints.

Bloat happens when your dogs stomach twists on both ends and causes discomfort, indigestion and may lead to premature death if left untreated. Symptoms include frothy saliva, excessive salivation, a noticeable bulge in your Mastiffs abdomen, coughing, fatigue and a lack of energy during exercise or play. This next section details grooming, care and exercise habits you will need to develop to keep a healthy and happy Mastiff Shepherd.

Typically, you will need a slicker brush, undercoat rake and metal comb to properly groom your Mastiff Shepherd. Expect to spend a minimum of 30 45 minutes briskly walking your Mastiff Shepherd everyday to keep it limber and healthy. It is recommended to socialize a German Shepherd Mastiff mix puppy early on to quickly train out any aggressive behavior.

However, if trained and socialized properly, Mastiff Shepherds can be great guardian companions for small or large families.

German Shepherd Mastiff mixes, like other designer dogs, frequently combine the most desirable qualities from two breeds that on the surface may not seem to have much in common.

A German Shepherd Mastiff mix is an uncommon hybrid that is most often fawn, black, or brindle. The German Shepherd Mastiff Mix is a loyal and affectionate pet with moderate energy levels, high drive, focus, intelligence, and territorial tendencies.

If you are lucky enough to acquire a Mastiff Shepherd, you must establish control early on, and focus heavily on socialization and training. Your commitment to your German Shepherd Mastiff mix should ultimately lead to a polite and well-behaved dog that is gentle and protective with your children, and retains the level head and versatility of an exceptional working animal. German Shepherds did not come into their own as a distinct breed until 1899 with ex cavalry officer Max von Stephanitz and a medium yellowish sable dog named Hektor Linksrhein from Karlsruhe .

Hektor, who became Horand after Stephanitzs acquisition, was a Thuringian region Shepherd who happened to have exceptional herding abilities. They also were difficult to train, and so Stephanitz incorporated herding dogs from the Wurttemberg and Swabian regions to balance Shepherds working ability and add focus, hardiness, versatility, trainability, and stamina. Similarly to many breeds, Mastiffs almost went extinct during World War II with meat rations.

They also battled in wars, baited bulls, participated in dogfights, and guarded livestock through various phases of their evolution. Your German Shepherd Mastiff mix will receive physical traits to varying degrees from both parents. Show and working lines differ in the slope from withers to hips, conformation champions usually illustrating exaggerated hind leg or pelvic angles.

The head of the German Shepherd is large but noble with a somewhat square but long muzzle and upright ears. All washed-out and dilute colors such as cream, blue, Isabella, and liver are serious faults in sanctioned AKC conformation classes. Mastiffs are almost square with a level back, broad powerful chest, and a massive head.

Fawn can range from cream to silvery tan, and apricot is any shade of red from light orange to deep reddish-brown. Show ring judges prefer brindle dogs to have uniform striping, but the bands are often less distinct. Her head will be large and round with a broad muzzle not as deep as a Mastiffs nor as long as a German Shepherds.

Expect your Shepherd Mastiff cross to be barely longer than tall with a moderate brush on the tail. It can appear in a puppy who also receives a recessive black gene from the German Shepherd parent. German Shepherds and Mastiffs both have distinct personalities, and your mix can show an unpredictable blending of the two types.

German Shepherds have shown flock protectiveness that extends to the household and family from their earliest working days. A German Shepherd should have a solid character that is fearless and unwavering but give plenty of warning before a justified act of aggression. You can usually attribute inappropriate aggression in Shepherds to certain family lines (poor breeding), improper socialization, abuse, or neglect (lack of meaningful attention).

While historically territorial and protective of home and property as well as ferocious in war, modern Mastiffs have seen selection for level-headedness and docility. Like German Shepherds, Mastiffs have certain family lines that are predisposed to shyness or atypical aggression. Occasional individuals will also be good guard dogs, although you can train the majority of them for some type of protective work.

German Shepherds readily learn that children and other animals in the household warrant their protection. However, German Shepherds do not necessarily extend kindness to anyone outside the family circle and often exhibit aggression against other dogs and suspicion towards strange children. Besides, your Shepherd Mastiff mix is likely to have a dense undercoat that he may blow seasonally in the spring and fall.

Like Mastiffs and Shepherds, your dog will do well in cold weather as long as not for prolonged periods under 30 degrees Fahrenheit. Your Shepherd Mastiff mix will have a moderately dense double coat with possible fringes and ruffs on some parts. Your German Shepherd Mastiff mix is likely to live eight to twelve years, a little longer than many giant breeds.

Dogs from Shepherd and Mastiff ancestry most commonly suffer from hip and elbow dysplasia, bloat, bleeding disorders, obesity, and urinary tract infections which lead to bladder stones. Hip and elbow dysplasia starts during growth and can lead to crippling arthritic changes later. Large- and giant-breed dogs are exceptionally susceptible to bloat because of their deep chests and the volume of food they must eat.

Once a dogs stomach swells with fluid or gas, it can rotate, leading to life-threatening heart effects and electrolyte imbalances. Feeding one huge meal a day or raising your dogs food bowls increases the risk of GDV exponentially. Your German Shepherd Mastiff mix will be happy and healthy with 45 to 90 minutes of activity a day.

Also, it is important to engage your dogs mind with training, adventurous deviations from the routine, and socialization, as well as her body. Typically, we see German Shepherds on their own, reaching up to 13 years of age, but its more common that they live for less time than this.

There isnt a lot of information about the first appearance of the German Shepherd Mastiff mix, but before you get any dog you should know about its parents. Theres a lot of information on the German Shepherd and the mastiff dog separately.

The numbers have significantly grown today and theyre very popular home companions and pets among modern dog owners. Allergies, bloat, cataracts, cherry eye and aortic stenosis are some of the problems that German Shepherds commonly face.

You should also know that degenerative myelopathy, hip and elbow dysplasia and Cushings disease are all issues that are coming to German Shepherds that require your constant attention. There are a lot of diseases that can be diagnosed when theyre puppies so that makes it a big risk to go to a breeder that doesnt know anything about their parents. Although you could end up with a perfectly fine dog, you might have to deal with a lot of medical issues that you wont know about.

Make sure that you will observe your dog for anything wrong and bring them to the vet if they start to show signs of health problems. Because of their ability to gain weight easily as adults you need to avoid that by feeding them properly and let me the run-around or walk for their exercise daily.

What is a Mastiff Shepherd?

Chances are that you’ve considered adopting a Mastiff Shepherd cross for its reputation historically as a stalwart guardian and for its heft. Or, you’re looking for a guard dog that needs very little maintenance and upkeep to remain healthy and happy.Read on for more information detailing care, basic facts and grooming about the large-sized Mastiff Shepherd.

Life Span

A German Shepherd Mastiff mix full grown dog’s life expectancy is 8 – 12 years.

Price

A German Shepherd Mastiff mix puppy can cost between US$350 – $1100. English and French Mastiff German Shepherd mixes are usually the more expensive breeds.

Commonly-occurring known health issues

Consider the following list of health problems associated with Mastiff Shepherds. Most of the problems are a result of the hybrid’s large size.

Joint problems

Hip and elbow dysplasia are the most common Mastiff Shepherd joint problems you can expect. These joint problems commonly affect large-sized dogs. Insufficient exercise and a poor diet may worsen the joints, which can negatively impact your Mastiff Shepherd’s quality of life.German Shepherd Mastiff mix weight is a major factor that affects the severity and onset of joint issues; Mastiff Shepherds more vulnerable to contracting these problems the bigger and heavier they are.Symptoms include weakness in the hind or front leg areas, avoiding exercise, and displays of aggressive behavior from your Mastiff Shepherd when touching the affected joints.

Cherry eye

While not always a painful health issue for Mastiff Shepherds, cherry eye can be unsightly and unpleasant aesthetically. Cherry eye happens when a dog’s third eyelid prolapses and leaves a visible red lump near the corner of your dog’s eye.In severe cases, Mastiff Shepherds may experience inflammation, swelling, irritation and dryness in the affected eye which may lead to infection.This health issue is asymptomatic and typically won’t show any signs before appearing.

Bloat

Bloat is a digestive issue known to affect Mastiff Shepherds. Bloat happens when your dog’s stomach twists on both ends and causes discomfort, indigestion and may lead to premature death if left untreated. This can also lead to malnutrition and sudden, unexpected death if left untreated.Symptoms include frothy saliva, excessive salivation, a noticeable bulge in your Mastiff’s abdomen, coughing, fatigue and a lack of energy during exercise or play.

Coat

A Mastiff Shepherd’s coat will typically be a thick density but is of short-medium length. Tibetan Mastiff mixed with German Shepherd breeds will usually have the longer length coats. However, it should be noted that Mastiff Shepherds are habitual shedders and will need regular coat grooming.Having a vacuum cleaner to clean up loose fur is helpful. Typically, you will need a slicker brush, undercoat rake and metal comb to properly groom your Mastiff Shepherd. Use long brush strokes to even out its coat and be prepared to groom this dog 2 – 3 times a week.

Exercise

Despite a German Shepherd Mastiff mix size, it is a relatively docile dog that does not need much exercise. However, because of genetics, this dog can become heavy and overweight if not exercised regularly.Expect to spend a minimum of 30 – 45 minutes briskly walking your Mastiff Shepherd everyday to keep it limber and healthy. 1 – 2 hours of moderate intensity exercise is the ideal amount of time you should set aside to exercise and play with your Mastiff Shepherd.

What is a Mastiff Shepherd’s personality like?

A German Shepherd Mastiff mix temperament can be likened to that of a stubborn, gentle giant. Read on to get a better idea of what you can expect your Mastiff Shepherd to behave like in this section.

Gentle

It is recommended to socialize a German Shepherd Mastiff mix puppy early on to quickly train out any aggressive behavior. But usually, Mastiff Shepherds are very docile, relatively quiet dogs and can be safely left with children unsupervised.The Mastiff parent genes give this dog a more laid back, patient and sweet personality.

German Shepherds have a prominent working background

The German Shepherd is a relatively new breed.German Shepherds did not come into their own as a distinct breed until 1899 with ex cavalry officer Max von Stephanitz and a medium yellowish sable dog named Hektor Linksrhein from Karlsruhe.Hektor, who became Horand after Stephanitz’s acquisition, was a Thuringian region Shepherd who happened to have exceptional herding abilities.However, many Thuringian types were too aggressive, prey-driven, and intense to be good working dogs.They also were difficult to train, and so Stephanitz incorporated herding dogs from the Wurttemberg and Swabian regions to balance Shepherd’s working ability and add focus, hardiness, versatility, trainability, and stamina.

From German Shepherd

The German Shepherd is about 22 to 26 inches high at the shoulders with a long, powerful neck, and strong sloping shoulders. She is somewhat longer than tall and weighs between 50 and 95 pounds.Show and working lines differ in the slope from withers to hips, conformation champions usually illustrating exaggerated hind leg or pelvic angles.The head of the German Shepherd is large but noble with a somewhat square but long muzzle and upright ears.German Shepherds have a thick double coat that is usually short or medium in length. They also have a long bushy tail.Experts classify German Shepherd colors as standard, faulted, or disqualified. White Shepherds and the extremely rare panda German Shepherd cannot show, but the AKC and UKC allow their full registration.All washed-out and dilute colors such as cream, blue, Isabella, and liver are serious faults in sanctioned AKC conformation classes.Standard colors are the classic black and tan and red and tan, bicolor, solid black, red sable, and wolf grey or agouti. Many Shepherds have s black facial mask.

Looks From Mastiffs

The Mastiff, as his name implies, should look impressive in size. Mastiffs stand 27.5 to 30 inches tall at a minimum and weigh 120 to 230 pounds.Females can be much smaller than males without penalties as long as they still appear powerful.Mastiffs are almost square with a level back, broad powerful chest, and a massive head. The ears are relatively small and folded and the eyes wide-set.Unlike German Shepherds, Mastiffs have a short, broad, and very deep muzzle. Their tails are rather short and thick and rope-like.Acceptable colors for Mastiffs are fawn, apricot, and brindle. Fawn can range from cream to silvery tan, and apricot is any shade of red from light orange to deep reddish-brown.All Mastiffs, even brindle dogs, should have black facial masks.Show ring judges prefer brindle dogs to have uniform striping, but the bands are often less distinct.Incomplete striping, or reverse brindle, is a serious fault if not a disqualification for a Mastiff. Nonstandard colors are rare and include blue, chocolate, pied, and cream.

German Mastiff Appearance

Your German Mastiff will be a large dog from 25 to 36 inches tall that weighs 80 to 200 pounds.Her head will be large and round with a broad muzzle not as deep as a Mastiff’s nor as long as a German Shepherd’s. The ears may stand up but will more likely be semi-prick and larger than a Mastiff’s.Expect your Shepherd Mastiff cross to be barely longer than tall with a moderate brush on the tail.Brindle, if the genes are present, is dominant to any agouti colors which include fawn, sable, black and tan, bicolor, and recessive black.Fawn is dominant over the other agouti colors. Therefore, your German Mastiff will most likely be fawn or brindle and have a black mask.However, recessive black is a rare trait in the Mastiff. It can appear in a puppy who also receives a recessive black gene from the German Shepherd parent.Uncommonly, your pup could be black and tan or chocolate.

Guard Potential

German Shepherds have shown flock protectiveness that extends to the household and family from their earliest working days.Historical breeders selected for dogs with a guarding instinct and German Shepherds quickly became one of the primary breeds for guard duty in homes.The German Shepherd continues to be a top guard dog choice.Despite its reputation, no German Shepherd should be an indiscriminate biter, given to unprovoked attacks.A German Shepherd should have a solid character that is fearless and unwavering but give plenty of warning before a justified act of aggression.You can usually attribute inappropriate aggression in Shepherds to certain family lines (poor breeding), improper socialization, abuse, or neglect (lack of meaningful attention).While historically territorial and protective of home and property as well as ferocious in war, modern Mastiffs have seen selection for level-headedness and docility.Most people consider them intimidating but gentle giants. Nevertheless, they make excellent watchdogs.Mastiffs will protect family members if they sense a threat. A Mastiff, like several other breeds, often takes his behavioral cues from his owner.If you are relaxed and friendly, your Mastiff will treat your guests cordially.Mastiffs usually move between perceived danger and their owner, according to Thedogplace.org, and only bite as a last resort. Her huge size makes it rare that a Mastiff has to attack.She also has a formidable bark to deter ill intent.Like German Shepherds, Mastiffs have certain family lines that are predisposed to shyness or atypical aggression.Your German Mastiff should be friendly with strangers or slightly aloof. She will remain relaxed as long as she perceives a cordial relationship between you and your guests.Although intimidating and equipped with ferocious threat posturing, your mix should be very unlikely to bite. Your German Shepherd Mastiff mix will most of the time be an extremely effective watchdog.Occasional individuals will also be good guard dogs, although you can train the majority of them for some type of protective work.

Getting Along With Other Dogs

Mastiff’s gentle nature extends to other animals and children. According to Vetstreet.com, a well-socialized Mastiff can get along with other dogs and even cats.Nevertheless, their large size necessitates your supervision at all times around small pets and little kids.German Shepherds readily learn that children and other animals in the household warrant their protection. They tend to be tolerant and even gentle around toddlers.However, German Shepherds do not necessarily extend kindness to anyone outside the family circle and often exhibit aggression against other dogs and suspicion towards strange children.Some have a strong drive to chase moving objects.Use caution with your Shepherd mix around other animals and children until you can gauge her disposition. Most will be fine if you supervise them around children and dogs within your household.Socialize your dog properly and she will be more likely to be able to also play appropriately around your friends’ children and dogs at the park.

German Shepherd

During the 1800s the German Shepherd was bred in Germany to help her large flocks of sheep. They were bred from a lot of the native dogs that were local and Central and Northern Germany. They were trying to keep the flock together and lead them back into their fold. Barking would only aggravate the sheep and make them panic so they did it with stealthy movements. In modern times the German Shepherd was introduced to the world during an exhibit show in Germany in 1882. A German group for the breed was founded in 1899 and the club was then named the German Shepherd Dog Club of Germany.When their popularity rose in the 1900s, In World War I, many were enlisted. Then, during World War II, they were used as assistants to the Army and the Royal Air Force. is Frida still a Top Choice for guard dogs and police dogs today. They’re easily trained and smart so they’re used in many search and rescue operations. How to become a popular household pet. They’re very gentle and friendly with their family and their strong looks and traits make them great dogs.

Mastiff

The word Mastiff is the name for a group of large dogs and not just one single breed. They all have the same features but the different origins. The ancestors of what’s known as a mastiff breed today came from Asia and existed more than a thousand years ago. Some believe that there were even massive dogs appearing in Egyptian drawings that dated back from 3000 BC. Earlier Chinese references to these big dogs date back from 1121 BC. Allegedly, Julius Caesar also referred to Mastiffs when invading Britain in 55 BC. In stories it’s claimed that they gallantly fought with their owners.One of the most common Mastiff breeds is the old English Mastiff and it was a popular herding and guard dog in England. They were bred to herd sheep and keep the wolves at bay. They’re protective nature was good for protecting the flock of sheep. The poor and presidents owned these dogs For that reason, mastiffs became a popular home companion because of their gentle and loving traits. They were great guard dogs and protectors for their families.Sadly the Mastiff breeds were used for fighting which became illegal in England in 1835. Their population decreased after this. By 1908 only 35 mastiff dogs were registered with the English Kennel Club when originally in 1871 there were 63. In 1945 there were only 8 Mastiffs of breeding age in Great Britain. The numbers have significantly grown today and they’re very popular home companions and pets among modern dog owners.

Appearance

Dogs that are a hybrid, like the german shepherd mastiff mix, have characteristics of both parents. This means that they hardly all look the same. Some pups in the litter will favor one of the parents more than the other. Your puppy might look more like a german shepherd while its sister in their little might look more like the mastiff parent. They still end up looking like a mix of some of the features from their parents, so their appearance might vary. There are some generalizations that you can make about them.The size and weight will vary, but you should find that they’re in between both of the height and weight of their parents. For example, the german shepherd parent can be a medium to large dog and the mastiff dogs are generally just large dogs. You can expect the offspring to be anywhere from medium to large dogs. The shepherd mastiff hybrid can be anywhere from the size of the smallest german shepherd female to the size of the large male mastiff.There are some numbers that you can keep in mind to gauge what size you’re expecting your puppy to be. The female german shepherd is around 22 to 24 inches and 50 to 70 pounds. The male german shepherd is around 24 to 26 inches tall and 75 to 90 pounds. Female and male mastiffs will both reach around 28 to 36 inches tall, which is much taller than the german shepherd might be. The mastiffs will reach anywhere from 119 pounds to 220 pounds.Because of the large range, you might want to ask the breeder about the size of their parents. That’s a better indicator of what size your puppy will be. You should make sure that you can care for a dog of the largest size in case that’s what size the puppy will be. This means that you should ensure that you can care for a dog that’s as large as a mastiff in case your dog reaches that size. You can do that by making sure that your house is a necessary size.Besides their size, their fur also impacts their appearance. Once again, they’ll have a mixture of their parent’s fur. Both of the breeds have a dense outer coat that’s coupled with a soft undercoat. Their fur is straight and short, which is great for owners who don’t have a lot of time to groom their dogs. If your dog has more traits from its german shepherd parent, then it’ll have a thicker coat around its neck. Most puppies tend to have the short dense coat all throughout their body, but they might have the same fluffy look that some german shepherds have.Their fur coat will usually be colored black, tan, fawn, or apricot. They often have black areas around their faces because this coloring is common for both parent breeds. Overall, their fur can be a wide variety of colors, but you can expect some of their facial features to be dedicated by the parents too. Some might have longer facial features like the german shepherd or short, wrinkly snouts like the mastiff. Either way, you end up with an adorable, soft dog that will melt your heart.

Life Expectancy and Health

The life expectancy is dictated by their lifestyle and health, but overall, you should know that larger dogs have shorter lifespans than smaller dogs. This mix will have a lifespan that’s anywhere from 9 to 13 years. There are a lot of factors that can influence how long of a lifespan they have.Dogs have diseases and illnesses that they suffer from just like humans do. Dealing with these diseases promptly and properly. There are some things that you should know about hybrids and diseases. Most of the time, hybrids have a better immune system than their parents, but if one of the parents has diseases that are genetic, then your puppy might have that. You can ask the breeders about the health of the parents so that you can know what you might have to deal with. All of these diseases are ones that you have to work with your vet to constantly monitor and work through.There are a lot of common problems did German Shepherds face. Allergies, bloat, cataracts, cherry eye and aortic stenosis are some of the problems that German Shepherds commonly face. You should also know that degenerative myelopathy, hip and elbow dysplasia and Cushing’s disease are all issues that are coming to German Shepherds that require your constant attention. Because of this you want to ask the breeder if your puppy’s parents had any of those diseases and if so, you want to ensure that you’re able to take care of a dog with these diseases.Mastiff breeds also have a few common issues that are coming to them. While elbow and hip dysplasia and cherry eye or both symptoms that you’ll see in both breeds, you can also expect pulmonic stenosis, mitral dysplasia, seizures and progressive retinal atrophy. All these diseases are ones that you have to work with your vet to constantly monitor and work through.There are a lot of diseases that can be diagnosed when they’re puppies so that makes it a big risk to go to a breeder that doesn’t know anything about their parents. It’s also a risk to get a German Shepherd Mastiff mix from a shelter. Although you could end up with a perfectly fine dog, you might have to deal with a lot of medical issues that you won’t know about. Make sure that you will observe your dog for anything wrong and bring them to the vet if they start to show signs of health problems. Besides that there isn’t anything you can do besides love and take care of your dog.

Exercise Requirements

This dog does have a few exercise requirements. Because of their ability to gain weight easily as adults you need to avoid that by feeding them properly and let me the run-around or walk for their exercise daily. Because this is a bigger dog you need to ensure that they’re getting daily exercise because their muscles and Bones need to be strong and healthy so that they can support themselves. You can play with them in your backyard or let them run around in a dog part to keep them healthy.You can also make sure that they have a few toys to keep them busy at home. There are a lot of toys made to keep them moving constantly. Getting those toys will make sure that they aren’t lazy around your house and make them lose calories. You want to ensure that your dog is getting a lot of movement to match their caloric intake to ensure that they aren’t gaining a lot of weight. Luckily, you can work with your vet to make sure that you have a great play schedule for them and maybe meet up with the people you know what’s dogs so that you can give your dogs a few friends to run around with.