Full Grown Savannah Monitor?

Savannah monitors are medium sized lizards found in Africa. Theyre also known as savannah monitor lizard and Boscs monitor, the latter more predominant in Europe, as it was first described by Louis Bosc, a Frenchman.

They can be found across Sub-Saharan Africa and also in the central and western parts of the continent, extending south into the Congo River. Sometimes they get into duels and start wrestling during which their bodies become intertwined and their bites can cause severe damage on the other.

A cornered savannah monitor hisses loudly and strikes the ground with its tail to ward off the predator. They consume toads, snakes, small mammals, birds, lizards, and eggs. A male follows after a female in a relentless manner, occasionally scratching her or biting her neck.

Adult savannah monitors have blunt teeth which they use to crack open snail shells. Savannah monitors are popular pets due to their docile temperament.

How big is a full grown Savannah Monitor?

Adult Size: 2.5 to 4 feet in length (0.8-1.3m). Physical Characteristics: The stocky Savannah Monitor is considered a “medium-sized” monitor with a wide head and short neck and tail. They are typically broPostswn and grey with paler spots over the back and, like all monitors, have a forked tongue.

How big do savannah monitors get weight?

5 pounds

How long does it take for a Savannah monitor to be full grown?

Hatchlings are only a few inches long, but grow rapidly and can reach maturity in as little as 2 years, though 3 to 4 years is more common. Adults range in size from 2.5 to 3.5 feet in total length with both larger and smaller specimens occasionally occurring.

Are Savannah monitors friendly?

Savannah monitors are large pet lizards that are one of the more docile species of the monitor group. They are not overly active creatures and usually tolerate handling.

Intelligent and appealing, the savannah monitor (Varanus exanthematicus) is a rewarding captive for the experienced lizardkeeper who has the time and patience to tame this large lizard. Adults measure a little more than 3 feet long, which means they need a substantial enclosure with plenty of room to move around. Also, in nature these lizards inhabit sparse grasslands and seasonally dry, desolate places in Senegal east to lower Sudan and western Kenya, so their captive environments need to mimic these conditions.

Others, pointing out that young monitors are arboreal and spend much of their time in trees, recommend a terrarium 8 or 9 feet tall. This provides a confined space that allows you to closely examine the lizard, so you can make sure it is eating and look for early signs of ill health.

A savannah monitor also requires a variety of hides that conceal its entire body and allow it to turn around when inside. Whether you use potting soil, a clay-based mixture or good old dirt, the substrate needs to be deep and packed tightly so it has maximum firmness. Provide young monitors with small live trees, branches or other objects that offer climbing opportunities.

Large orthopterans can be locally collected during the warm months, and they can supplement a regular diet of giant roaches and gut-loaded crickets. Ravi Thakoordyal, a veteran savannah monitor breeder, has written that he has successfully maintained and repeatedly bred lizards without using UV. They thrive within a fairly large temperature and humidity range, have a broad diet, and many lizardkeepers can provide for their terrarium needs.

An adult savannah is neither so large as to require extraordinary space nor so small as to remain comparatively fragile when handled. I am also aware of at least two verified cases where savannah monitors nipped off sizeable bits of dogs ears, so give these lizards the respect they deserve. Director of the nonprofit Virtual Museum of Natural History (curator.org), he has been a herpetologist for more than 40 years with interests in lizard evolution, zoogeography and neurophysiology.

Savannah Monitors are naturally found in sub-Saharan Africa. As their name implies (savannah terrain), they like to live among the rocky desert and woodlands.

These African lizards need to live in large enclosures with high temperatures. As their name implies ( savannah terrain ), they like to live among the rocky desert and woodlands.

Reptile owners love them because they have a very docile nature when compared with larger monitor species. In the wild, they hunt using their tongue to pick up chemical cues from the environment they live in. Unfortunately, they are considered to be endangered by some organizations due to hunters seeking them out for their skin.

Savannah Monitors are carnivorous; eating insects as well as the occasional rodent. Savannah Monitor PortraitThere are five subspecies of the Varanus exanthematicus, so their appearance and size will vary based on which species you purchase. You may need to rely on a veterinarian or expert herpetologist to sex your lizard, because there is no true sexual dimorphism.

Full grown Savannah Monitor lizards are between two to four feet in length by four years old. At birth, Babies are only a couple inches long, but they grow incredibly quickly. This lizard lives in a natural habitat of rocky deserts and forests in Africas wild savannah.

They will spend much of their time basking and soaking themselves and will likely display similar behaviors in their enclosures. Because they like to spend plenty of time soaking and in the forest, their cage should have some logs, branches, rocks, and even cork bark slabs. Their tank will likely need to be custom made and should be ready for when you bring your lizard home.

The top of their enclosure should have a screen to allow for airflow, whilst being secured to prevent any escapes. They grow quickly so some reptile owners decide to put them directly into their adult enclosures: Active during the day, they require a UVB light for essential vitamin production, especially for babies!

Being a desert-type lizard, Savannah Monitors are not as picky about their humidity levels as many other reptiles . Finally, because monitors are messy, a suitable substrate would be something that can be cleaned easily! You should also avoid reptile carpet as it can entangle and tear their large claws.

They have a tendency to defecate in their water, so be sure to monitor it carefully and immediately change it if it becomes dirty. This may require removing substrate or various logs and branches and temporarily homing your monitor somewhere else. They may also eat thoroughly cooked pieces of beef, but ideally they should stick to mice and invertebrates.

A carnivorous reptile, they hunt and sense their environment by flicking their tongue to pick up chemical cues. Food should be dusted with a calcium supplement, and a multivitamin should be fed if you are not feeding mice to your monitor. Adults should be fed several insects 1-2 times a week (larger monitors may eat less frequently).

Baby Savannah Monitors will eat the same basic diet, anything from crickets and waxworm larva to pre-weaning mice. Any live food, for adults or babies, should be removed at the end of the day if uneaten. Their water bowl should be large enough for them to soak in; built-in containers or plastic pans work great.

Metabolic bone disease can result from a lack of calcium and may cause your lizard to feel sluggish. If your Lizard starts abnormally gaining weight, you may need to restrict the amount of food they are consuming temporarily. Wild-caught Monitors are prone to having parasites, which is one reason that you should acquire this species through a breeder.

Most of their time will be spent basking and occasionally foraging for food, they do this with tongue flicking. To ward off predators, they might hiss loudly and thrash their tail , or it may play dead as a last resort. They are a very friendly species and can be taught to tolerate handling over a period of time.

A wild adult can deliver a strong bite or nasty scratch it not socialized properly. Washing your hands before and after handling is good for your health and can prevent infections. Another problem owners may find during handling are scratches from their lizards nails.

The best way to handle your monitor is to place a firm grip behind the reptiles head and put one hand near the hind limbs. A male will follow a female and will periodically bite and scratch her neck until she allows copulation. For your monitor, a suitable nest box can be a plastic tub filled with soil.

After she lays her eggs, they should be incubated in groups in a ten-gallon aquarium filled with vermiculite and water. There is a 5-6 month incubation time , and the container should be opened occasionally to let oxygen in. Wild-caught monitors are highly prone to having parasites and are often stressed when forced to adapt to a captive lifestyle.

Breeding them in captivity can be difficult, so while finding a captive-bred monitor may prove to be more of a challenge, it is worth the effort for your experience and the species protection. They do require a high temperature in a large habitat, but they also have an easy feeding routine and are tame.

Read More

Breeding Savannah MonitorsThere are several approaches you can take in keeping a savannah monitor, and each reflects your intent for the lizard. The absolute minimum required to provide a healthy home include the following five topics.

Savannah Monitor Climate Control Tips

Thinking of taking the plunge? Keepers of savannah monitors need the following materials to increase their chances for success:

Savannah Monitors Require Deep Soil

Unless you’re housing very young lizards, the number one substrate is soil. All monitors dig, and savannah monitors dig long, deep, often complex tunnel systems. Fine or beach sand won’t work. The soil must hold enough moisture to support the monitor’s engineering efforts. Whether you use potting soil, a clay-based mixture or good old dirt, the substrate needs to be deep and packed tightly so it has maximum firmness. A depth of 15 to 20 inches is fine for general keeping needs. Keep it moist with periodic sprayings, but avoid making puddles.You can skip the deep soil with young lizards because you want to be able to observe them easily. They will do fine on a thin layer of soil. Smooth gravel or paper towels are easy to clean, but they are not the best choices. Provide young monitors with small live trees, branches or other objects that offer climbing opportunities.

Savannah Monitor Overview

Savannah Monitors are naturally found in sub-Saharan Africa. As their name implies (savannah terrain), they like to live among the rocky desert and woodlands.This species is used to the hot temperatures of sub-Saharan Africa. They naturally soak themselves in pools of water to keep cool.Reptile owners love them becauseGrayish-tan in appearance, they have spots on their backs and rings on their short tails.They eat a variety of invertebrates and small mice. In the wild, they hunt using their tongue to pick up chemical cues from the environment they live in.Solitary lizards, they will only interact with their own species during the breeding season. If you are planning to keep this reptile, it should be the only one you have in the enclosure.Unfortunately, they are considered to be endangered by some organizations due to hunters seeking them out for their skin.

Color Variations and Markings

This species has a gray-brown base color with have dark-edged yellow spots on their back. They have a bluish tongue and yellow and brown rings on their tail.

Savannah Monitor Enclosure

This lizard lives in a natural habitat of rocky deserts and forests in Africa’s wild savannah.They are relatively inactive in the wild. They will spend much of their time basking and soaking themselves and will likely display similar behaviors in their enclosures.Because they like to spend plenty of time soaking and in the forest, their cage should have some logs, branches, rocks, and even cork bark slabs.Any of these items will work as long as they can be easily cleaned or removed for cleaning.

Cleaning & Misting

Although they are only considered a medium-sized monitor Savannahs are still a large reptile.They need a large enclosure which should haveTheir tank will likely need to be custom made and should be ready for when you bring your lizard home.Enclosures should be made of plexiglass or plastic.The top of their enclosure should have a screen to allow for airflow, whilst being secured to prevent any escapes. These monitors are very strong and smart.They grow quickly so some reptile owners decide to put them directly into their adult enclosures:Active during the day, they require a UVB light for essential vitamin production, especially for babies! Lighting should be on for about 12 hours of light and 12 hours of darkness each day. You should also use an incandescent bulb to create a very hot basking spot. Make sure the incandescent light is out of reach from your monitor.In terms of temperature,A basking spot should be even warmer, as high as 120℉ is ideal.Being a desert-type lizard, Savannah Monitors are not as picky about their humidity levels as many other reptiles.In their natural environment, it is very dry and arid. Because of this, the basking spot can be kept at very low humidity. The rest of the tank should be kept at between a 50 to 60% humidity.The water-pool in your Savannah Monitor’s enclosure should be large enough to soak in too.Finally, because monitors are messy, a suitable substrate would be something that can be cleaned easily! It will need to be spot cleaned every day and thoroughly cleaned out at least once a week.Given that they will be in a large enclosure a substrate like newspaper will be the easiest to clean. Make sure not to use sand or gravel as this can cause bowel obstruction, especially in Juveniles.You should also avoid reptile carpet as it can entangle and tear their large claws.

Savannah Monitor Lifespan & Health

This Lizard eats a variety of invertebrates and small mammals in the wild. They are not picky about what they eat and may eatA carnivorous reptile, they hunt and sense their environment by flicking their tongue to pick up chemical cues.Food should be dusted with a calcium supplement, and a multivitamin should be fed if you are not feeding mice to your monitor.When you feed your monitor, place the food into the cage so that they can forage for it. This keeps them more active:Baby Savannah Monitors will eat the same basic diet, anything from crickets and waxworm larva to pre-weaning mice.Any live food, for adults or babies, should be removed at the end of the day if uneaten.Finally, monitors should always have access to clean water.Their water bowl should be large enough for them to soak in; built-in containers or plastic pans work great.

Typical Behavior

When not in captivity, the Savannah Monitor is a solitary reptile and will only socialize with its own species during its breeding season.Known for being very territorial, males will fight if they come into contact with one another.Most of their time will be spent basking and occasionally foraging for food, they do this with tongue flicking. Tongue flicking in captivity may indicate that your monitor is hungry or just being curious.They only communicate with each other through pheromones and other chemical signals which they detect with their tongue.Mating and fighting will show different forms of communication.To ward off predators, they might hiss loudly and thrash their tail, or it may play dead as a last resort.These creatures must be housed alone due to their territorial behavior towards other lizards.

Are Savannah Monitors Friendly?

Yes, especially as far as monitors go. They are a very friendly species and can be taught to tolerate handling over a period of time.They are generally one of the less nervous monitor species so get along well with their owners.However, they are strong lizards and require a strong grip.Once tame they may not show aggression to you.A wild adult can deliver a strong bite or nasty scratch it not socialized properly.

Handling Advice and Tips

The Savannah Monitor is one of the most docile species among the monitor genus. However, this does not mean they tame easily.Monitors require a lot of patience and work from their keeper to to be well-socialized.Safe handling requires lots of face time and repetitive handling.It is a commonly known fact that most reptiles carry Salmonella bacteria. Washing your hands before and after handling is good for your health and can prevent infections.Another problem owners may find during handling are scratches from their lizard’s nails.The best way to handle your monitor is to place a firm grip behind the reptile’s head and put one hand near the hind limbs.

Baby Savannah Monitor

The breeding season occurs during the wet season (i.e. May). A male will follow a female and will periodically bite and scratch her neck until she allows copulation.Females need a nest box to lay eggs. In the wild, she would usually make her own or lay them in a termite mound. For your monitor, a suitable nest box can be a plastic tub filled with soil.After she lays her eggs, they should be incubated in groups in a ten-gallon aquarium filled with vermiculite and water.There are usually 20-50 eggs per clutch.Hatchlings are a couple inches long at birth.They will start eating insects and other invertebrates a week after hatching. They will need to be feed nearly every day at the start and then less often as they age (see diet guide above).

Savannah Monitor Facts

Savannah Monitors are one of the more readily available monitors andIt is strongly recommended that you obtain your Lizard from a trusted breeder, rather than somewhere where they are wild-caught.