Full Grown Munchkin Cat?

Have you met the Munchkin cat? His Dachshund-like silhouette, triangle-shaped ears and large eyes have captured the hearts of cat lovers across the nation. And, not to mention, has caused a bit of controversy in the feline world.

How big is a full grown Munchkin Cat?

5-7 inches

Are Munchkin cats expensive?

Owning a Munchkin Cat On a Budget. Buying the Munchkin will cost you around $1000 for a pet quality cat, while exhibition standard cats cost $2000 and up. If you do not intend to show your cat, consider buying one without the same pedigree breeding.

How much do Munchkin cats grow?

Munchkin cats tend to be small in size. A fully grown Munchkin cat might weigh between 4-9 pounds or more and range in height anywhere from about 6″-9″ inches tall.

How small are Munchkin cats?

The Munchkin is a small to medium-size cat weighing 5 to 9 pounds. Other than his short legs, he resembles any other cat, with a short or long coat, either of which can be just about any color or pattern.

When researching for a new pet to own, you may have stumbled across the Munchkin cat. But how big do they get, on average, and what kind of size can you expect from them? Intrigued by this rather cute breed of cat, I spent some time researching them. I will be sharing all the information I was able to find regarding their proportions in this article here today.

In many ways, it comes as no surprise to learn that this particular feline is considered to be the Dachshund of the cat world. Munchkin cat movements are in many ways akin to ferrets, where they are relatively low to the ground and quite sprightly.

So, if you are contemplating getting one of these cute and distinct cats, be sure to keep on reading to discover and find out exactly what you can expect in regards to their size. The munchkins short limbs result from a genetic mutation and are the most defining feature of the breed. This cat can adapt well to most living situations due to their size, but they do still need enough room to run and play.

Munchkin cats stay short their entire life due to a genetic mutation. The current breeding process involves matching one Munchkin, regardless of gender, with a cat who does not possess the short leg gene. Short-legged cats may look cute, but it does not give this breed any advantages, make them happier or healthier.

But one thing is for sure, these cats are typically bred properly and in similar ways to other breeds. Either way, kittens of all breed put on weight rapidly during the first few weeks of life. AgeAverage Weight (In Pounds) 1 Week0.3 0.6 lbs2 Weeks0.375 0.875 lbs3 Weeks0.75 1.1 lbs4 Weeks0.75 1.3 lbs5 Weeks0.875 1.8 lbs6 Weeks1 2 lbs7 Weeks1.2 2.3 lbs8 Weeks1.4 2.6 lbs10 Weeks1.8 3.1 lbs12 Weeks2.2 4 lbs16 Weeks4 5.5 lbs1 Year5 8 lbsSource: Lovetoknow As you can see, most of a Munchkin cats growth happens within the first 16 weeks of life.

As this stage and generally speaking, Munchkins legs will typically be at least three inches shorter than most other cats. Despite their different walk and jumping challenges, Munchkins are relatively healthy, living between 12-15 years on average. One thing to be aware of for this particular breed is that some kittens suffer from a condition called lordosis which makes the muscles grow too short that the spine shrinks into the cats body.

Some Munchkins are also affected by a deformity that causes the cats breast bone to descend inwards. Other cat breeds can suffer from either pectum excavatum or lordosis, and for this reason, many breeders contend that these conditions are not breed-specific. Munchkin cats do not require any extra medical care or attention than other breeds.

So lets elaborate on these factors to give you better insight into caring for a Munchkin cat, if you did decide to get one: Munchkin cats require the same quality diet and nutrition as any other domestic feline. In the instance that your cat is too heavy, obese, is older or has diabetes; you will need to make arrangements accordingly.

Remember, there is a lot of additional work required by their shorter legs here, and jumping and general movement is added pressure and strain. It goes without saying that you will always need to provide fresh, clean water for your cat as they need suitable hydration at all times. While many will argue that there is no proof that the mutation contributes to any health issues, keep in mind that the breed was only made official in 1991.

Lordosis This disease mainly affects kittens, and it occurs when the muscles grow so short that the spine shrinks into the cats body. With a robust wellness plan and regular check-ups, cats with scoliosis can live a long and healthy life despite looking different. Pectum Excavatum This is a deformity that causes the cats breast bone to descend inwards.

Clinical signs include weight loss, pneumonia, postural deficits, coughing, and dyspnoea. In the event of any of the above conditions being inherited by your car, your veterinarian should be able to detect them early and devise a treatment plan accordingly. Nevertheless, it is important you get your kitten examined early to ensure that if any condition is present, it does not have a long-lasting impact on the growth and quality of life of your cat.

While the above conditions can also be somewhat scary to think about, there are many treatment options available and its important to remember that any breed of cat can suffer with them. Getting a range of cat toys and climbing frames comes recommended, which will help them to access higher areas.

Munchkin cats are quick, energetic, fun-loving, and affectionate. What they lack in leg length they more than make up for with their unique look and loving temperament.

If you’re wondering how much Munchkin cats cost, you can expect to spend between $500$1200 for your feline , depending on pedigree. These petite pets are noticeably low to the ground, with legs about 3 inches shorter than the average cat.

These petite pets are noticeably low to the ground, with legs that are about 3 inches shorter than the average feline. The rest of the Munchkin body is pretty typical of your run-of-the-mill house cat, with most of adults weighing somewhere between 69 pounds. The Munchkin‘s short limbs are due to a natural genetic mutation and are the breed’s defining feature.

These curious kittens love to explore the world around them, and they’ll even perch on their hind legs like a rabbit to get a better view! These curious kittens love to explore the world around themthey’ll even perch on their hind legs like a rabbit to get a better view! “As a general rule, they love to socialize with people, are full of energy, and enjoy playing and exploring.

Munchkin cats can have hoarding tendencies similar to that of a magpiethey love to stash away “favorite” objects to play with later, Krieger says. What they lack in height, the Munchkin makes up in personality: These cats are known to keep their fun-loving, kittenish attitude well into adulthood. This energetic cat loves working up serious speed on her little legs, and can round tight corners with precision.

A cat tree with a low entrance point is a great way to help your Munchkin explore heights easily. They can usually get enough air to land on couches and sofas in search of a lap or sunny spot on a cushion, and they’re just as good at climbing as other cat breeds. These adorable cats make a loving addition as family pets or as a companion to adult owners.

Left: Munchkins come in a variety of coat colors and patterns, including tabby, like this handsome fellow. Center: Their short legs may keep them from climbing on top of high bookcases, but most can still get enough air to jump onto couches and low ledges. Right: Munchkins are a smart breed of cat that can be trained to follow basic commands and to walk on a leash.

Your Munchkin will clean herself, but her limited leg reach can make hygiene a little more difficult for this cat. Because of her short legs, make sure litter boxes , food dishes, and water bowls have low edges so your Munchkin can access them without problems. Left: Munchkin cats may need a bit of help grooming themselves as their short legs make it challenging to reach spots the way their long-legged counterparts can.

The jury is still out on whether the Munchkin‘s controversial leg mutation can cause other health issues or spinal problems; this breed is relatively young, so there’s still a lot for experts to learn. Their appearance is the result of a genetic mutation that can occur naturally in litters, but today the Munchkin is specifically bred to produce cats with little legs. Some debate whether or not it’s ethical to breed Munchkins, because it intentionally passes on the physical deformity of their incredibly short legs, which can impact their mobility.

According to TICA, tiny cats were recorded around the globe throughout the 20th century, but their condition appeared naturally and wasn’t bred intentionally.

You want your Munchkin to be happy and healthy so you can enjoy your time with him, so do your homework before you bring him home. For more information on the history, personality, and looks of the Munchkin, or to find breeders, visit the websites of the

Keep him indoors to protect him from cars, diseases spread by other cats, and attacks from other animals and he can live 13 years or longer. The Munchkins short legs turned out to have a dominant inheritance pattern, similar to Corgis and Dachshunds .

Hes not a leap tall buildings in a single bound kind of cat, but he is definitely capable of making his way to high places if he so chooses. Challenge his brain by teaching him tricks and providing him with puzzle toys that will reward him with kibble or treats when he learns to manipulate them. Remember that after youve taken a new kitten into your home, you have the power to protect him from one of the more common health problems: obesity.

Whether youre planning to get your feline friend from a breeder, a pet store, or another source, dont forget that old adage let the buyer beware. And dont forget to ask your veterinarian, who can often refer you to a reputable breeder, breed rescue organization, or other reliable source for healthy kittens. Sometimes a pedigreed cat ends up at a shelter after losing his home to an owners death, divorce, or change in economic situation.

Wherever you acquire your Munchkin, make sure you have a good contract with the seller, shelter, or rescue group that spells out responsibilities on both sides.

This short-legged cat is controversial

Here’s where the controversy comes in. While The International Cat Association began recognizing the Munchkin cat in 1995, it’s the only cat organization to do so. Some believe that the breeding of Munchkins is unethical because it encourages the breeding of physical deformities; therefore, the Munchkin cat is still unrecognized by the Cat Fanciers’ Association and American Cat Fanciers Association.

He loves cuddling

The Munchkin cat craves company: kids, dogs, other animals, complete strangers — there’s never enough! They live for a game of chase or a catnip mouse prime for hunting but will never turn down the offering of a warm lap for cuddling.

A Munchkin cat is especially curious

If you thought the typical cat breed was curious, the Munchkin cat is curious on a whole different level. He can, and will, explore every nook, corner and cranny of your abode more than once — and likely pilfer a pretty something each and every time!

Munchkin

Munchkin cats are quick, energetic, fun-loving, and affectionate. What they lack in leg length they more than make up for with their unique look and loving temperament.The Munchkin, as you may have guessed from her name, is on the short side. She’s actually unique among dwarf cat breeds—this petite kitty actually fits all the other size indicators of a normal adult-sized cat, except for their little legs. Never heard of a Munchkin? That’s probably because they’re relatively new, having been legitimized by The International Cat Association as their own breed in the early 2000s.Because these cats are the result of genetic mutation and a somewhat complicated breeding process, they are relatively rare. If you’re wondering how much Munchkin cats cost, you can expect to spend between $500–$1200 for your feline, depending on pedigree.

Appearance

Munchkin cats have a distinct look that most cat aficionados either love or hate. These petite pets are noticeably low to the ground, with legs that are about 3 inches shorter than the average feline. The rest of the Munchkin body is pretty typical of your run-of-the-mill house cat, with most of adults weighing somewhere between 6–9 pounds. Visually, many might consider the Munchkin the Dachshund of the cat kingdom. Some even refer to the Munchkin as a “sausage cat,” a similar nickname to the beloved “wiener dog.”The Munchkin‘s short limbs are due to a natural genetic mutation and are the breed’s defining feature. Munchkin cats come in all color combinations and coat styles, and can have short coats, long coats, or be hairless. Short-haired Munchkins have plush medium-density coats, while long-haired Munchkins have silky smooth fur. Popular coat shades and patterns are tabby, calico, gray, and solid black.An important note: Although the Munchkin cat comes in many shades, they are their own distinct breed—not miniature versions of other cat breeds.

Temperament

Munchkins are active, friendly cats who typically get along with children and other pets. These curious kittens love to explore the world around them—they’ll even perch on their hind legs like a rabbit to get a better view!These cats are known to keep a fun-loving, kittenish attitude well into adulthood. When they’re not busy playing with toys and running around, these cuddly cats love to snuggle up with their people. Munchkins are sociable, intelligent, and self-assured felines who love spending time with their humans.”Munchkins are known as confident extroverts,” says Marilyn Krieger, certified cat behavior consultant. “As a general rule, they love to socialize with people, are full of energy, and enjoy playing and exploring. They are curious about their environment [and check] out everything.”Munchkin cats can have hoarding tendencies similar to that of a magpie—they love to stash away “favorite” objects to play with later, Krieger says. If your jewelry comes up missing, your little Munchkin may be to blame.

Living Needs

The Munchkin cat is well-suited to most indoor living situations, as long as she has space to run and play.”They are extremely active and energetic,” Krieger says. “They enjoy playing alone and with others, and frequently race around the house amazingly fast.”This energetic cat loves working up serious speed on her little legs, and can round tight corners with precision. She may not be able to make it to the top of a bookshelf in a single bound, but she will still love jumping and climbing.A cat tree with a low entrance point is a great way to help your Munchkin explore heights easily. They can usually get enough air to land on couches and sofas in search of a lap or sunny spot on a cushion, and they’re just as good at climbing as other cat breeds. So keep an eye on the curtains and make sure she doesn’t skedaddle up any trees.The Munchkin is an easygoing breed who gets along well with dogs, other cats, and small children. These adorable cats make a loving addition as family pets or as a companion to adult owners. Basically, whatever your living situation, a Munchkin can fit right in. Just make sure she isn’t left alone for long periods of time.”These cats are social butterflies,” Krieger says. “They love attention from their favorite people and most enjoy sitting on laps, being petted, and cuddling.”

Care

Grooming your Munchkin will be guided by their coat style. Short-haired Munchkins should be brushed weekly, while long-haired Munchkins should be brushed more frequently to keep their coat free of tangles. Your Munchkin will clean herself, but her limited leg reach can make hygiene a little more difficult for this cat. Occasional bathing is a good idea to help keep your little kitty friend clean. You should also keep her nails trimmed and ears cleaned.Munchkins don’t need a lot in the way of human-guided exercise: These cats love to run and play during the day, and will usually tucker themselves out. Provide them with cat toys, low-to-the-ground cat trees, and scratchers to help them work out their energy.”Munchkins love to run and jump, despite their small stature,” says Natalie L. Marks, DVM, CVJ, Blum Animal Hospital in Chicago, Ill. “Encourage cat tree play, feather toys and interactive play with other cats and dogs.”Munchkins are an intelligent breed of cat who can be trained to fetch and even walk on a leash. Krieger says they respond well to clicker training with ample positive reinforcement. They’re naturally social, but early introduction to family members (especially children and other pets) will help your Munchkin kitten feel secure.Provide your kitty a diet of high-quality cat food and fresh water. Because of her short legs, make sure litter boxes, food dishes, and water bowls have low edges so your Munchkin can access them without problems. Check in with your veterinarian to make sure your cat is getting her nutrition needs met.

Health

Munchkins are generally healthy cats with an expected lifespan of 12–15 years. But like any breed, these little cats can be affected by certain health issues. Mostly, Munchkins can develop problems that affect most feline breeds, including heart problems, urinary tract infections, and pancreatitis.”As a relatively new breed, they are so far thought to be a healthy breed without any increased disease risks,” Marks says. “However, because of their very short legs, it’s very important to avoid obesity and keep a lean body condition.”The jury is still out on whether the Munchkin‘s controversial leg mutation can cause other health issues or spinal problems; this breed is relatively young, so there’s still a lot for experts to learn. You can help keep your Munchkin in good health by keeping regularly scheduled veterinarian appointments.

History

While they weren’t recognized as a breed by The International Cat Association until 2003, short-legged cats have existed for many years. Their appearance is the result of a genetic mutation that can occur naturally in litters, but today the Munchkin is specifically bred to produce cats with little legs. Some debate whether or not it’s ethical to breed Munchkins, because it intentionally passes on the physical deformity of their incredibly short legs, which can impact their mobility. Because of the controversy, the Cat Fanciers Association (CFA) and the American Cat Fanciers Association (ACFA) still don’t recognize the Munchkin as an official breed.Despite the argument around their official recognition, instances of short-legged cats have been around for many years. According to TICA, tiny cats were recorded around the globe throughout the 20th century, but their condition appeared naturally and wasn’t bred intentionally. In 1983, a short-legged cat named Blackberry gave birth to a litter of kittens. This was the beginning of the modern-day Munchkin.The modern breeding process involves mating one Munchkin (the mutation is not sex-selective) with a cat who doesn’t have the mutation. The mutation is dominant, and will result in a litter of Munchkin cats. However, when two Munchkins are bred together, the mutation is fatal—this is another reason why the Munchkin breeding practice is controversial. Before bringing home any pet, make sure you’re working with an ethical breeder.

Choosing a Munchkin Breeder

You want your Munchkin to be happy and healthy so you can enjoy your time with him, so do your homework before you bring him home. For more information on the history, personality, and looks of the Munchkin, or to find breeders, visit the websites of the
Fanciers Breeder Referral List and
The International Cat Association.
Put at least as much effort into researching your kitten as you would into choosing a new car or expensive appliance. It will save you money in the long run.
A reputable breeder will abide by a code of ethics that prohibits sales to pet stores and wholesalers and outlines the breeder’s responsibilities to their cats and to buyers. Choose a breeder who has performed the health certifications necessary to screen out genetic health problems to the extent that is possible, as well as one who raises kittens in the home. Kittens who are isolated can become fearful and skittish and may be difficult to socialize later in life.
Lots of reputable breeders have websites, so how can you tell who’s good and who’s not? Red flags include kittens always being available, multiple litters on the premises, having your choice of any kitten, and the ability to pay online with a credit card. Those things are convenient, but they are almost never associated with reputable breeders.
Whether you’re planning to get your feline friend from a breeder, a pet store, or another source, don’t forget that old adage “let the buyer beware”. Disreputable breeders and unhealthy catteries can be hard to distinguish from reliable operations. There’s no 100% guaranteed way to make sure you’ll never purchase a sick kitten, but researching the breed (so you know what to expect), checking out the facility (to identify unhealthy conditions or sick animals), and asking the right questions can reduce the chances of heading into a disastrous situation. And don’t forget to ask your veterinarian, who can often refer you to a reputable breeder, breed rescue organization, or other reliable source for healthy kittens.
Be patient. Depending on what you are looking for, you may have to wait six months or more for the right kitten to become available. Many breeders won’t release kittens to new homes until they are between 12 and 16 weeks of age.
Before you buy a kitten, consider whether an adult Munchkin might be a better choice for your lifestyle. Kittens are loads of fun, but they’re also a lot of work and can be destructive until they reach a somewhat more sedate adulthood. With an adult, you know more about what you’re getting in terms of personality and health. If you are interested in acquiring an adult
cat instead of a kitten, ask breeders about purchasing a retired show or breeding cat or if they know of an adult cat who needs a new home.