Full Grown Mini Aussie?

This is a question that more than 6616 of our readers have been asking us! Luckily, we have found the most appropriate information for you!

The Mini Australian Shepherd is a ‘fun sized’ version of the Australian Shepherd. He offers the same exuberant personality, but in a small, convenient size. He fits into smaller homes much more easily than a full sized herder.

This eager pooch is fantastic at befriending children and makes a great watchman for your home. This breed descended from Pyrenean Shepherds and two different kinds of Collies ( the Border and Rough ). Rodeo lovers in the 60s wanted a travel sized version of the Aussie Shepherd to take with them. His small size results from generations of selectively pairing off and breeding the smallest Aussie Shepherds. In modern times, this breed can serve as both a family companion and a low intensity working dog. His limitless energy and high intelligence make him quite a handful for inexperienced and first time owners. Mini Australian Shepherds need a wide outdoor space to run with reckless abandon. As of 2015, the American Kennel Club recognizes Mini Aussies and full sized Australian Shepherds as two different breeds. In spite of his small size, he is perfectly capable of keeping livestock in line. He is better than full sized Aussies at herding smaller livestock such as goats and younger sheep. Though it has been bred since the 1960s, the miniature size was not acknowledged by the breed standard or recognized by major kennel clubs until 2011. The breed standard for the Mini Australian Shepherd describes him as a little dog with a strong build. His muzzle is medium sized, slightly rounded and ends in a black or brown nose. Merle appears in patches of blue or red mixed with a dusting of white. Since this breed is born for farm and outdoor work, its protective double coat is resistant to water and harsh weather. After nine months, your dog’s weight gain will slow down as it is about to reach its full adult size. Still, this breed will always find a way to make you proud, he absolutely thrives off his owner’s approval. Mini Aussies bark whenever they are excited , confused, alarmed or feeling playful. Even small tasks, like carrying sticks or toys, will cater to your dog’s workaholic nature enough to keep him happy. It is impossible to have a bad day when you watch this hyperactive puppy run circles around the yard! Reign in an easily distracted dog by making sure that training takes place in a quiet and secure area. Set aside 45 minutes for walking and spend the rest of the time for training and play. For a fun way to train your puppy, and keep his body and mind in great shape, try setting up a backyard obstacle course. If your Mini Shepherd carries a homozygous merle gene, there is a 25% chance that he will be deaf from birth. If your puppy does not respond to loud noises and has difficulty perceiving commands, he may be deaf in one or both ears. Once deafness is diagnosed via a hearing exam, your vet can help you and your dog to manage the condition. Patellar luxation Hip and elbow dysplasia Progressive retinal atrophy You should feed this dog the same type of food that you would give to a standard sized working breed, but in smaller amounts. Split his daily kibble into three meals, totaling up to 1 and a half cups a day. Miniaturization became a big trend in the 1990s thanks to adorable ‘ teacup dogs ’ that are small enough to fit in your palm or purse. Mini Australian Shepherds were bred over 30 years prior, with the purpose of being small enough to travel easily with rodeo cowboys. In some cases, a mini dog is produced by pairing a large and a small breed together. Miniature versions of large working breeds are also a better fit for apartments and urban homes than their full sized siblings. Heart, bone, and joint problems are all particularly common in miniature and teacup dogs. A smaller than average body also makes the dog susceptible to metabolic disorders such as hypothyroidism. If a full sized Aussie is a little bit too much for you, the Miniature Australian Shepherd may be your best bet. A Mini Aussie can keep an active family entertained for hours on end. Mini Australian Shepherds may not be the most affectionate breed, but he is always eager to make you proud.

How big is a full grown mini Australian shepherd?

Quick Facts on the Miniature American Shepherd. According to the AKC, the weight can be from 20 – 40 pounds. Males are slightly taller in shoulder height at 14 – 18 inches, with females at 13-17 inches. Miniature American Shepherds are a hardy and rustic breed — a little longer than tall.

How big is a miniature Aussie?

Miniature American Shepherd / Mass

Do Mini Aussies stay small?

We’ve established that mini Australian Shepherd size is smaller than a standard Australian Shepherd. … A Miniature American Shepherd may grow to be 13 to 18 inches tall at the shoulder. They weigh somewhere between 20 and 40 pounds. Males are generally larger than females.

How long until a mini Aussie is full grown?

Time to full size/weight: 1-1.5 yrs… although they continue filling out up to 2.5 years. By 9 months you’ll know roughly what dimensions they will have, at that point they stop growing and start just filling out.

You can find several dog breeds in Miniature or tiny sizes, and the Australian Shepherd is one of them. Frequently referred to as the Aussie, Australian Shepherds are highly intelligent and energetic herding dogs, and so, they require a great deal of exercise and space. Depending on their lifestyle and living space, many owners will opt for the smaller-sized Aussies, like Mini or Toy, but what’s the difference?

Despite their name, these dogs are an entirely separate breed from the Australian Shepherd and typically measure the size and weight of a full-grown Aussie at 13-18 inches tall and 20- 40 pounds. In the case of a Mini Aussie, you will find that, at full growth, they typically peak around 14 to 18 inches tall from the top of the shoulder to the floor. As with any breed, there are certainly outliers that might weigh more or less than the average range, but typically, a Mini Aussie will be about half the size of a full-sized Australian Shepherd. Since the Mini Aussie is a sort of designer breed, meaning they are carefully bred for a specific trait(s), they are typically more expensive than a normal Australian Shepherd. Mini Aussies were selectively bred to create an even smaller dog with all the same personality and appearance characteristics as the Standard Australian Shepherd. In terms of care, the most significant difference is that the Toy Aussie requires slightly less exercise and grooming than the larger breeds due to its size. They were all originally bred in the Western United States, particularly California, Colorado, Wyoming, and Idaho, to herd and protect grazing sheep, and so, they are highly energetic dogs that need extensive exercise and mental stimulation. Since the Aussie has a double coat, they require a significant amount of regular grooming to assist with shedding and prevent matting. Fortunately, this breed is also easy to train to avoid such unwanted behaviors, and they can learn a vast amount of tricks and tasks. Don’t be fooled by their size; each Aussie breed is extremely energetic and needs ample exercise and stimulation to prevent unwanted behaviors. However, once they are properly trained, an Aussie, big or small, is guaranteed to be an exceptionally loving and loyal pet to any owner or family.

What it is: Miniature Australian shepherds, also known as miniature American shepherds, arguably the dog breed of the moment. Extremely smart, athletic, and loyal (a “Velcro” dog, to quote one breeder), these herding dogs have become popular pets in recent years. They’re smaller than full-size Australian shepherds — 14 to 18 inches tall and roughly 20 to 40 pounds, versus more than 18 inches and 40 to 60-plus pounds — and have wide variation in the color of their eyes, which can be mismatched or marbled in shades of bright blue, brown, and hazel; and mottled coats, which can be blue-gray, red, black, or white.

Founded in 1990, the Miniature American Shepherd Club of the USA (MASCUSA) began the first stage of AKC recognition in 2012 and was fully recognized in 2015. MASCUSA’s certification by the AKC indicates that momentum had been building around mini American shepherds for years, but its inclusion was nonetheless an important moment in the popularization of the breed. AKC recognition signals to breeders — including those who don’t care much about pedigree, much to the chagrin of those who do — that there’s a market for a particular kind of dog. Leland, who started breeding mini Aussies seven years ago (she registers with the American Stock Dog Registry), also says the trend has been snowballing. Outdoor Voices CEO Tyler Haney, for instance, has a heartbreakingly cute Instagram account dedicated to her two “tiny Aussie cowboys.”

The Miniature American Shepherd resembles a small Australian Shepherd. True herders in spite of their compact size, Minis are bright, self-motivated workers and endearingly loyal and lively companion dogs who have an affinity for horses.

Mini Australian Shepherd Overview

The Mini Australian Shepherd is an Australian Shepherd but smaller in size.He is registered as a Miniature American Shepherd under the American Kennel Club. The mini part of his name is much more accurate than the Australian Shepherd part. SurprisinglyThis breed descended from Pyrenean Shepherds and two different kinds of Collies (Rodeo lovers in the 60s wanted a travel sized version of the Aussie Shepherd to take with them. His small size results from generations of selectively pairing off and breeding the smallest Aussie Shepherds. This is common in most mini breeds, popular examples include the Mini Poodle and Miniature Husky.In modern times, this breed can serve as both a family companion and a low intensity working dog. If you have younger children, a Mini Aussie is a better option than a full sized. However, your kids must be old enough to handle its energy and exuberance.This dog is better built for a life indoors than its full sized siblings, but, this does not mean that it is an indoor dog.Mini Australian Shepherds need a wide outdoor space to run with reckless abandon. If you live in the city, you and your pooch will spend a lot of time at the park.

Popularity

As of 2015, the American Kennel Club recognizes Mini Aussies and full sized Australian Shepherds as two different breeds. He isJust like his full sized counterparts, he is classified under the herding breed group. In spite of his small size, he is perfectly capable of keeping livestock in line. In fact, the best herding dogs are often smaller, a good example is the Corgi.He is better than full sized Aussies at herding smaller livestock such as goats and younger sheep.Mini Australian Shepherds may look very cute and endearing, but they are not the most affectionate pooch around. Do not confuse this breed with a lapdog. This eager little farm dog would rather show its love through hard work than cuddling. In the home, he will do very well as an alert watchdog.He has much more energy than other small dog breeds. He can be quite overbearing if he is not given enough stimulation and exercise throughout the day.

History

The history of the Mini Australian Shepherd begins with the history of the standard Australian Shepherd. The Australian Shepherd was first bred from Pyrenean Shepherds.Pyrenean Shepherds were bred by the Basque people of France and Spain. The Basque people brought their Pyrenean Shepherd hybrids over to Australia, where they were crossed with Rough Collies and Border Collies. These puppies were then imported into the United States and called Australian Shepherds.Herders and ranchers in the American south soon fell in love with this dog. They admired him for his ability to effortlessly herd sheep, goats and even cattle.When the breed became popular in the state of California, it was mistakenly believed to have come from Australia.By the 1960s, this herding breed had become a rodeo star.This is where the Mini Aussie got his start. Rodeo fans wanted an Australian Shepherd that they could easily travel with. ByThese smaller sized dogs were known by breeders as Mini Australian Shepherds until the 2010s. In 2011, the breed was renamed to ‘Miniature American Shepherd’ and accepted into the American Kennel Club’s Stock Foundation Service.Four years later, it gained recognition under the herding group.

Mini Australian Shepherd vs Australian Shepherd

When researching the Mini Australian Shepherd, you have probably come across a lot of search results that include the ‘Mini American Shepherd’ breed. What is the difference between the two dogs? Actually,Miniature American Shepherd is the registered breed name for the Miniature Australian Shepherd. By fans and breeders this dog is known as a Mini Australian Shepherd.Though it has been bred since the 1960s, the miniature size was not acknowledged by the breed standard or recognized by major kennel clubs until 2011. Prior to 2011, the breed was simply called Mini Australian Shepherd.

Appearance

The breed standard for the Mini Australian Shepherd describes him asMini Australian Shepherd’s eyes can be brown, blue, or amber. Dogs with heterochromia will have two different eye colors.Aussies always have a very expressive face and sometimes appear to smile. His muzzle is medium sized, slightly rounded and ends in a black or brown nose. His rounded and floppy ears are known as ‘rose ears’. They hang down to just above his muzzle.Mini Aussies are very elegant in both appearance and movement. They walk with a refined and graceful gait.

Coat Colors

You will never see just one color on this dog! Its beautiful fur can have anywhere from two to four colors at a time.Merle fur patterning is the result of specific genes. A double merle coat can be beautiful to look at, but unfortunately the gene is associated with deafness and blindness. It is not advisable to breed two merle dogs together.Since this breed is born for farm and outdoor work, its protective double coat is resistant to water and harsh weather. This allows him to work well in different and cold climates.Their top coat is long and fluffy, and the underlayer is very dense and wooly. His coat is managed through seasonal shedding known as blowouts. It will never need cutting.

Mini Australian Shepherd Personality

As his name suggests, the Mini Australian Shepherd is adorably small. It is one of the few herding breeds that is classified as a small dog. Breeding the runts of standard sized Australian Shepherds’ litters for several generations has ensured that this dog will stay adorably ‘puppy sized’ for its entire life.Adult males standMany different factors influence your dog’s final adult weight:The Mini Aussie reaches its adult size between one and two years of age. Most of your puppy’s growth and development will occur in its first six months of life. You can expect to see the largest amount of weight gain during this period.This puppy grows a bit slower than a standard Shepherd. It will grow at four to six ounces per week until it reaches nine months of age. After nine months, your dog’s weight gain will slow down as it is about to reach its full adult size.

Are Mini Australian Shepherds Good Family Dogs?

This dog reserves all of hisHe can fit into smaller family homes that his full sized sibling may not be able to. His small size also means that he is much safer for homes with younger children. Still, his instincts mean that he can be quite a handful. Kids should be over the age of six and able to handle a dog safely.Herding behavior may show as pushiness or bullying and he may try to ‘herd’ small children.Overall, he is best suited to active families with children who are old enough to keep up with his energy. He should also be the only dog in the house. It is one of the few small dogs that can play safely with larger breeds, but does not play very well with smaller dogs.

Boredom Behavior

Destructive behavior is inevitable if your dog is under stimulated. Your puppy will let you know if he is feeling ignored by jumping and barking at you for attention.Nothing satisfies a Mini Aussie better than a job well done. Even small tasks, like carrying sticks or toys, will cater to your dog’s workaholic nature enough to keep him happy.The dog’s most lovable quality is his irrepressible and exuberant attitude. It is impossible to have a bad day when you watch this hyperactive puppy run circles around the yard!

Health Concerns

Working and herding dogs are normally very smart and therefore are very easy to train. But this puppy’s big energy can make things difficult. You will need a bit of patience and a positive attitude.Reign in an easily distracted dog by making sure that training takes place in a quiet and secure area. Keep children and other family members away until training is finished.Fortunately Mini Australian Shepherds learn very quickly.Mental stimulation is absolutely vital for any working breed. After all, its mind is already primed to accept new tasks. Not everybody has livestock available for tending, but your dog can help you with small tasks around the house:You will need toAlways keep your Aussie on his leash when you walk. Otherwise, he will attempt to ‘herd’ everything he sees.For a fun way to train your puppy, and keep his body and mind in great shape, try setting up a backyard obstacle course. This master of agility just loves to show off. He excels especially at games of tag and fetch. He especially excels at games of tag and fetch.

Pros

Many owners wish that their dog could stay a cute puppy forever. This is why miniaturization has become such a popular trend with dog breeders. Miniaturization became a big trend in the 1990s thanks to adorable ‘teacup dogs’ that are small enough to fit in your palm or purse.However, this particular miniature dog was not a product of the teacup trend. Mini Australian Shepherds were bred over 30 years prior, with the purpose of being small enough to travel easily with rodeo cowboys.There are two different ways to create a miniature version of a larger breed:

Cons

Unfortunately, miniaturization can be hard on a dog’s body. Many miniature and teacup breedsHeart, bone, and joint problems are all particularly common in miniature and teacup dogs. Patellar luxation is one of the most common joint disorders for many small and teacup-sized dogs.A smaller than average body also makes the dog susceptible to metabolic disorders such as hypothyroidism.It is important to do your research when adopting a miniature dog; getting to know your breeder and puppy before adoption is important. Requesting the parents’ paperwork and health records is also a good idea.

How to Tell if Your Aussie is a Mini?

The easiest way to determine if your dog is a Miniature Australian Shepherd is to measure and weigh them.Size is really the telling factor in determining the Australian Shepherd breed since a full-grown Australian Shepherd is usually larger than a full-grown Miniature Australian Shepherd.Both breeds will always be larger than a Tiny Australian Shepherd. We will discuss their differences in size and care further in this article.

What Size Are Mini Aussies?

Australian Shepherds were first bred in the late 1800s, and the Miniature American Shepherd came to be through selective breeding of smaller Australian Shepherds. Although these dogs have a lot in common, it is important to note that they are two separate breeds and have some key distinctions.The most significant difference between Aussie breeds is their size. In the case of a Mini Aussie, you will find that, at full growth, they typically peak around 14 to 18 inches tall from the top of the shoulder to the floor.In terms of weight, this breed will weigh 20-40 pounds on average. If you have a male Mini Aussie, they are more likely to be on the larger side of the scale versus females that tend to be smaller.As with any breed, there are certainly outliers that might weigh more or less than the average range, but typically, a Mini Aussie will be about half the size of a full-sized Australian Shepherd.

What Is The Difference Between a Mini and a Standard Australian Shepherd?

Because the Mini Aussie was bred from smaller Australian Shepherds, there isn’t too much that sets these breeds apart other than their size.A full-grown Australian Shepherd will typically measure 18-23 inches tall and weigh 47-57 pounds. Again, if the dog is a male, they are likely to be larger than the females, but overall, this breed is almost always twice the size of its Mini counterpart. For more about standard Aussie growth stages, visit Why is My Aussie Not Growing? which covers growth by ages.
Another significant difference is cost, although this factor differs widely depending on where the dog is purchased or bred.Since the Mini Aussie is a sort of designer breed, meaning they are carefully bred for a specific trait(s), they are typically more expensive than a normal Australian Shepherd. The cost of a purebred Mini Aussie can range from $1,000-2,000, whereas a purebred Australian Shepherd can be acquired for $600-$1,000

What is the Difference Between a Toy and Mini Aussie?

The Toy Aussie breed was created in much the same way as the Mini Aussie. Mini Aussies were selectively bred to create an even smaller dog with all the same personality and appearance characteristics as the Standard Australian Shepherd.On average, a full-grown Tiny Aussie measures 10 to 14 inches tall at the shoulder and weighs between 12 and 17 pounds.Again, apart from their size, there is little that differentiates this breed from the other Aussie breeds mentioned here.In terms of care, the most significant difference is that the Toy Aussie requires slightly less exercise and grooming than the larger breeds due to its size.All Aussie breeds have double coats that need to be brushed and groomed throughout the year, but since the Toy Aussie is smaller, there is obviously less hair to maintain. That doesn’t mean it’s not the same type of hair and doesn’t require as much effort. There’s just not as much hair to deal with.

Frances Dickson
What a beautiful day in history. A few thousand years ago, a chicken dressed as a rabbit layed the first ever Cadbury Egg. I think if I'm going to do a science fiction. General student. Friendly alcohol fan. Social media maven. Bacon fanatic. Passionate zombieaholic. Certified twitter practitioner. Interests: Birdwatching, Mosaic Art, Painting and Drawing
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