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The giant English Mastiff is an absolutely massive dog. There’s no doubt about it: their size and build are commanding. But have you wondered just what goes into them growing so large?

Before we get into puppy growth averages, let’s take a quick step back to remind ourselves that every dog is different. Reminders This article details the typical growth of an English Mastiff, but your puppy’s path may vary. Their overall health also determines their development, so take care to feed them properly and avoid injuries. Ultimately, your puppy may be bigger or smaller than these averages; if you find yourself alarmed by the growth, or lack thereof, it is a good idea to consult with a veterinarian to see if your pup is growing up healthily. English Mastiffs spend a long time growing up, so it’s wise to monitor their growth closely, to ensure the best health. It’s a good idea to keep a close eye on mom to make sure she’s eating well, but otherwise, you should let the puppies do their own thing and suckle milk to their hearts’ content. Obedience training should begin at this stage, as it sets a good foundation for their behavior for the rest of their lives. Walking long distances on hard surfaces can also disrupt proper bone development. You can still expect boundless energy, but again, they will be more inclined to listen to you now that you have established trust and a good rapport. They start mellowing out and becoming more relaxed, though they still require an hour’s walk split into two sessions daily. Continue to support their growth with proper nutrition and care to help them grow into their adult body. Mastiffs are very unique dogs in that it takes a long time for them to reach full bodily maturity. Obedience training is important to critical to ensure they don’t topple anyone over by jumping up on them whenever they’re excited. )2 months13.5123 months15.513.34 months18175 months20186 months21.5197 months22.5208 months23.320.59 months24.521.310 months2521.511 months25.521.71 year2622.5Full grown3027.5This chart is shorter than the weight one because the AKC doesn’t have a standard for maximum growth of an English Mastiff. These will also help you understand factors that affect your pup’s growth, allowing you to rest easy, even if it’s not going the way you imagined. While you can usually get a good picture of how large your dog will be by looking at the parents, you can’t always guarantee that size will manifest. Parents may have genes that indicate their offspring will be smaller, the same size, or larger than they are, and there is no way to tell until your dog has gotten to that point. You might ask your breeder about previous offspring lines to see what kind of puppies the parents have produced. The food should be designed for large or giant breed dogs, providing the complete, balanced nutrients necessary for growing bodies. While you cannot count on growth spurts or plateaus to happen exactly when you expect them, it’s important to realize that your dog is doing their best to grow at its own pace. Some studies show that early spaying or neutering can affect a dog’s growth plate. As a rule of thumb, females should be fixed after their first heat cycle, while males should be altered around two years old. Poor health doesn’t allow the body to reach its full potential, so take your sick dog to the veterinarian to ensure everything is alright. Lastly, given their vast size, it is vital to allow lots of space for your Mastiff to play. This helps prevent injury and allows their muscles to develop through full and free movement. Watching your dog grow can cause some form of anxiety — this is normal for a loving pet parent. Let’s answer some of the most frequently asked questions from English Mastiff owners who just want the best for their dogs. However, there’s no real way to peg this rate for your dog, as they are susceptible to random growth spurts and plateaus. Like when we discussed genetics, you can look at your dog’s parents and relatives to have a rough indication of how large they might grow. Suppose you notice limping, swelling, an unusual gait, or a hesitance to be involved in previously enjoyable activities. Letting your dog play too roughly or exercise too much can lead to injury, which can also bring them pain. Take care to give your dog ample space to play, and do not let them overexert themselves. Thankfully, most reputable breeders screen for hip dysplasia and do not allow parents with this condition to breed. Ultimately, it’s always a good idea to ask your veterinarian to help determine solutions for overweight or underweight dogs. Countless factors go into your dog’s growth, but we applaud you for taking time to research, so you know what to expect.

Are English mastiffs aggressive?

Most English Mastiffs are polite with everyone, but there is timidity (even extreme shyness) in some lines, and aggression in others. To ensure a stable temperament, English Mastiffs need earlier and more frequent socialization than many other breeds. … Mastiffs tend to be “gassy” dogs, which bothers some people.

Is an English mastiff a good family dog?

The mastiff, by nature, is courageous yet docile and makes an excellent family pet. Mastiffs are gentle with children, but make sure to supervise them around little kiddos—because of their large size, someone might accidentally be stepped on! The mastiff is the epitome of a gentle giant.

What is the largest breed of mastiff?

English Mastiff. The English Mastiff is officially the largest dog in the world. According to the Guiness Book of Records – a dog called Zorba weighed in at 142.7 kg and stood 27 inches high in 1981. 3 days ago

Do English mastiffs bark a lot?

Mastiffs are easy to house-train and do not bark much — unless they have a reason. They are also known to snore because of their long, soft palate, but this will vary with each individual dog.

The English Mastiff is a breed of large dog. The breed is referred to simply as the Mastiff by national kennel clubs, including the United Kingdom’s Kennel Club and the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI). They perhaps descended from the ancient Alaunt and Pugnaces Britanniae, with a significant input from the Alpine Mastiff in the 19th century. Distinguished by its enormous size, massive head, short coat in a limited range of colours, and always displaying a black mask, the Mastiff is noted for its gentle and loving nature. The lineage of modern dogs can be traced back to the early 19th century, but the modern type was stabilised in the 1880s and refined since. Following a period of sharp decline, the Mastiff has increased its worldwide popularity. Throughout its history the Mastiff has contributed to the development of a number of dog breeds, some generally known as mastiff-type dogs or, confusingly, just as “mastiffs”. It is the largest living canine, outweighing the wolf by up to 50 kg (110 lbs) on average.

Distinguished by its enormous size, massive head, short coat in a limited range of colours, and always displaying a black mask , the Mastiff is noted for its gentle and loving nature. With a massive body, broad skull and head of generally square appearance, it is the largest dog breed in terms of mass. English Mastiff colours are apricot-fawn, silver-fawn, fawn, or dark fawn- brindle , always with black on the muzzle, ears, and nose and around the eyes. The brindle markings should ideally be heavy, even and clear stripes, but may actually be light, uneven, patchy, faint or muddled. His docility is perfect; the teazing of the smaller kinds will hardly provoke him to resent, and I have seen him down with his paw the Terrier or cur that has bit him, without offering further injury. This ancient and faithful domestic, the pride of our island, uniting the useful, the brave and the docile, though sought by foreign nations and perpetuated on the continent, is nearly extinct where he probably was an aborigine, or is bastardized by numberless crosses, everyone of which degenerate from the invaluable character of the parent, who was deemed worthy to enter the Roman amphitheatre, and, in the presence of the masters of the worlds, encounter the pard , and assail even the lord of the savage tribes, whose courage was sublimed by torrid suns, and found none gallant enough to oppose him on the deserts of Zaara or the plains of Numidia . Domesticated Mastiffs are powerful yet gentle and loyal dogs, but due to their physical size and need for space, are best suited for country or suburban life. However, regular exercise must be maintained throughout the dog’s life to discourage slothful behaviour and to prevent a number of health problems. A soft surface is recommended for the dog to sleep on to prevent the development of calluses, arthritis, and hygroma (an acute inflammatory swelling). Problems only occasionally found include cardiomyopathy , allergies , vaginalhyperplasia , cruciate ligament rupture, hypothyroidism , OCD , entropion , progressive retinal atrophy (PRA), and persistent pupillary membranes (PPM). If you are not bent on looks and deceptive graces (this is the one defect of the British whelps), at any rate when serious work has come, when bravery must be shown, and the impetuous War-god calls in the utmost hazard, then you could not admire the renowned Molossians so much. [16] As far as the origin of the Pugnaces Britanniae is concerned, there is unproven speculation that they were descended from dogs brought to Britain by the Phoenicians in the 6th century BC. Introduced by the Normans , these dogs were developed by the Alans , who had migrated into France (then known as Gaul ) due to pressure by the Huns at the start of the 5th century. The first list of dog breed names in the English language, contained within The Book of Saint Albans , published in 1465, includes ” Mastiff “. They were described by John Caius [26] in 1570 as vast, huge, stubborn, ugly, and eager, of a heavy and burdensome body. The naturalist Christopher Merret in his 1666 work Pinax Rerum Naturalium Brittanicarum has a list of British mammals, including 15 kinds of dog, one of which is “Molossus, Canis bellicosus Anglicus, a Mastif”. Dorah was descended in part from animals owned by Thompson’s grandfather Commissioner Thompson at the beginning of the century, as well as a Mastiff of the Bold Hall line (recorded from 1705), a bitch purchased from canal boat men, another caught by Crabtree in a foxtrap , a dog from Nostal priory and another dog from Walton Hall , owned by the naturalist, Charles Waterton . Between 1830 and 1850 he bred the descendants of these dogs and some others to produce a line with the short, broad head and massive build he favoured. Marquis of Hertford’s crop-eared black Mastiff Pluto (1830)
Another important contribution to the breed was made by a dog called Lion, owned by Captain (later Colonel) John Garnier of The Royal Engineers . The dog, Adam, was of reputed Lyme Hall origin, but bought at Tattersalls and suspected by Garnier of containing a “dash of Boarhound”, an ancestral form of Great Dane . Subsequently, the Mastiff lost popularity but gained a consistency of type, with leaner, longer-headed specimens becoming relatively less common. John Paul ‘s 1867 painting showing a typical mid-19th century longer-headed apricot brindle Prominent among the breeders of this era who began to restore soundness were Edgar Hanbury and his relation, the politician and philanthropist Mark Hanbury Beaufoy , later Chairman of The Kennel Club, who reaching his peak as a breeder with the Crown Prince grandson, Ch. By the time World War I ended, other than a few exports to North America, the breed was extinct outside of Great Britain. In 1918, a dog called Beowulf, bred in Canada from British imports Priam of Wingfied and Parkgate Duchess, was registered by the American Kennel Club, starting a slow re-establishment of the breed in North America. In the British Isles during World War II, virtually all Mastiff breeding stopped due to the rationing of meat. [33] Only a single bitch puppy produced by the elderly stock that survived the war reached maturity, Nydia of Frithend. “Carlo” from ” The Adventure of the Copper Beeches “, a Sherlock Holmes short story by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle “Chupadogra” (a.k.a. “The Poacher at Bay” [30] “Lenny” is a brindle English Mastiff from the 2009 movie Hotel for Dogs “Moss” and “Jaguar”, of the Japanese series Ginga: Nagareboshi Gin and its sequel Ginga Densetsu Weed “Mason the Mastiff”, in the 2007 film Transformers [38] “Mudge” – Henry and Mudge (children’s books) [39] [40] “Old Major”, owned by Joseph Smith , Jr. After his death, owned by his son Joseph Smith III . Newly Englished, and increased by Barnabe Googe, Esquire , Conrad Heresbach , [Rei rusticae libri quatuor. A Complete History of Fighting Dogs (Pg.10) Howell Book House Inc. ISBN 1-58245-128-1 ^ “Regency Personalities – Georgiana – Duchess of Devonshire” . ^ The History & Management of the Mastiff , Author(s): Baxter, Elizabeth J; Hoffman, Patricia B., Dogwise 2004 ISBN 1-929242-11-5 ^ “AKC Dog Registration Statistics” .

Sassy the Mastiff came in 3rd overall at the National Mastiff Specialty with 79 entries. Ch. SalidaDelSol MistyTrails Sassy R.O.M., photo courtesy of MistyTrails Mastiffs

The medium-sized brown to dark hazel eyes are set wide apart with a black mask around them. When an intruder is caught the dog is more likely to hold them at bay, either by trapping them in a corner or lying on top of them rather than an all-out attack. Owners need to be firm, calm, consistent, confident with an air of natural authority to communicate to the Mastiff that dominance is unwanted. Also prone to CHD, gastric torsion, ectropion, PPM, vaginal hyperplasia, elbow dysplasia and PRA. Like all dogs, the American Mastiff should be taken on daily regular walks to help release its mental and physical energy. Caesar brought a pack of Mastiffs to Rome where the dogs were put on display as arena gladiators and forced to be in fights with human gladiators, lions, bull baiting, bear baiting and in dog-to-dog combat. They later became popular with the peasants in England where they were used as a bodyguard, protector of wolves and other dangerous predators and as a companion dog. Iron Hills Mastiffs and Argentine Dogos, photo courtesy of Phoebus

The colossal Mastiff belongs to a canine clan as ancient as civilization itself. A massive, heavy-boned dog of courage and prodigious strength, the Mastiff is docile and dignified but also a formidable protector of those they hold dear.

What to Expect

We know that English Mastiffs are going to grow up to be big, strong dogs. However, it also helps to know what to expect. This will help us prepare for all the changes as your puppy grows. While growth charts are helpful, we still need to understand how best to care for

Reminders

This article details the typical growth of an English Mastiff, but your puppy’s path may vary. They may end up having growth spurts or plateaus that overshoot or slow down their growth. This is normal. Your pup may also grow well beyond two years of age. Their overall health also determines their development, so take care to feed them properly and avoid injuries. Ultimately, your puppy may be bigger or smaller than these averages; if you find yourself alarmed by the growth, or lack thereof, it is a good idea to consult with a veterinarian to see if your pup is growing up healthily.

Puppy Growth Timeline

Here is a timeline of the average English Mastiff puppy’s growth, plus what to expect of them as they develop. We also cover what you must provide your puppy with during this time.

Birth to 2 Weeks

There is not much you can do with them from when your puppy is born up to when they are around two weeks old. At this time, they are totally reliant on their mother, since they are deaf and blind. It’s a good idea to keep a close eye on mom to make sure she’s eating well, but otherwise, you should let the puppies do their own thing and suckle milk to their hearts’ content. It’s at the two-week mark that the puppies’ eyes will begin to open, and their deafness starts disappearing.

1 Month

At around one month old to five weeks old, your puppy’s senses have developed considerably. They begin to be more social with their littermates. At this point, they have at least begun to wean off their mother’s milk. You may start to give them wet food at this point. Ensure they have a lot of time to play with their siblings to help with early socialization.

3 Months

This is the time to separate your puppy from its mom. They should be fully weaned off milk at this point. Obedience training should begin at this stage, as it sets a good foundation for their behavior for the rest of their lives. Housetraining should come easily. They should also be taught not to bite or nip at people and other animals. At this time, we start seeing more normal development happening.Here is what you can expect from male and female English Mastiffs. We will continue this observation through the rest of this section.

5 Months

At around the four-month mark, your puppy should be happily settled in to its new home. Continue obedience training and socialization as usual. You may both benefit from classes to help with training. Puppy kindergarten classes are also a good idea to help your dog understand how best to behave around other dogs. This will help them grow into confident, non-aggressive adults. Be sure they aren’t exercising heavily at this point in their life, as this could injure them.

7 Months

When your dog has reached six months old, they are really starting to fill out their bodies well. Start routines with your puppy to give them a sense of structure. Being a firm, confident leader at this point in their lives will help them to see you as their authority figure. They may be rambunctious, but you should still treat them with patience. Be sure to curb bad behavior as you see it, but always encourage good habits as well.

9 Months

When month eight comes around, you may notice that your English Mastiff has bonded to you quite well. Because of this, they may start developing separation anxiety if left alone for too long. This can lead to destructive behavior. When possible, it is best to leave someone to watch your dog so they don’t get bored and lonely. Beyond separation anxiety, your dog should be maturing at a satisfactory pace. They should be eating, exercising, and socializing on a proper schedule.

11 Months

At ten months, you will see your dog’s growth slow. This is normal and part of the development process. You can still expect boundless energy, but again, they will be more inclined to listen to you now that you have established trust and a good rapport.This is around the age when you will be able to take them for longer walks, though you shouldn’t give them more than they can handle. Two 25 minutes walks per day will make all the difference in helping them expend their energy.

What Happens Next?

At this point, now that your dog has reached their first birthday, home life should be harmonious. It may be difficult to rein them in sometimes given their size, but that’s why early obedience training is essential– just imagine if you hadn’t done it! Continue to support their growth with proper nutrition and care to help them grow into their adult body. Your Mastiff still has quite a bit of growing to do even well past the one-year mark!

Full Grown English Mastiff

Your gorgeous, affectionate, calm Mastiff will have grown a lot over five years. You can expect them to be truly massive both in weight and height– but also in heart. These dogs are very sweet and love nothing more than to be by your side.With regard to numbers, there’s a lot to consider. Male English Mastiffs will weigh anywhere between 160 to 230 pounds. Females are much smaller, weighing 120 to 170 pounds. As for height, it’s a bit trickier. AKC standard doesn’t give a specific maximum height for full-grown Mastiffs. However, males stand at a minimum of 30 inches, and females are 27.5 inches tall.

Growth Charts

We’ve put together two growth charts for the English Mastiff– one to track weight and one for height. This provides a quick and handy reference point when considering your dog’s growth. Just remember that the numbers we give are averages; your dog may fall outside these standards.

Weight

As you can see, many of these dogs grow to be heavier than many humans are– which can make them much more than a handful! Obedience training is important to critical to ensure they don’t topple anyone over by jumping up on them whenever they’re excited.

Height

This chart is shorter than the weight one because the AKC doesn’t have a standard for maximum growth of an English Mastiff. Once fully grown, males should be around 30 inches tall and 27.5 inches tall for females. However, many dogs fall outside these numbers.

Factors to Consider

It’s important to consider these factors to ensure that your dog grows up properly. These will also help you understand factors that affect your pup’s growth, allowing you to rest easy, even if it’s not going the way you imagined.

Genetics

English Mastiffs are bred to be giant dogs. This is part of their genetic line, but some dogs are larger than others. While you can usually get a good picture of how large your dog will be by looking at the parents, you can’t always guarantee that size will manifest. This is just a small part of the overall genetic picture.Parents may have genes that indicate their offspring will be smaller, the same size, or larger than they are, and there is no way to tell until your dog has gotten to that point. You might ask your breeder about previous offspring lines to see what kind of puppies the parents have produced.

Nutrition

Nutrition is the foundation of your dog’s good health and can be a determining factor in how large or small your dog will grow.In the first two formative months, ensure that your dog is getting enough milk from its mother. It’s important to feed your dog a few appropriately-sized meals daily of the best dog food for Mastiffs, ensuring balanced health and nutrition. The food should be designed for large or giant breed dogs, providing the complete, balanced nutrients necessary for growing bodies. Giving them vitamins and minerals can also help to ensure growth.

Growth Spurts and Plateaus

Growth spurts and plateaus can happen to any developing dog at any age. Sometimes, you may encounter plateaus at certain times in your dog’s life. For example, female English Mastiffs often reach a plateau around ten months. While you cannot count on growth spurts or plateaus to happen exactly when you expect them, it’s important to realize that your dog is doing their best to grow at its own pace. Growth spurts are random, so don’t stress about them too much. Simply do your best to care for your dog, and their bodies will take care of the rest.

Neutering and Spaying

Spaying or neutering your dog early in life will not stunt its growth. However, as a large breed dog, your English Mastiff’s joints may be affected. Some studies show that early spaying or neutering can affect a dog’s growth plate. This could delay its closure and allow dogs to grow taller than they usually would. While this may sound good, this may predispose them to joint disease later in life.Be sure to ask your veterinarian when it is appropriate to spay or neuter your dog. As a rule of thumb, females should be fixed after their first heat cycle, while males should be altered around two years old.

Physical Health

The final factor to consider is your dog’s overall physical health. If your pup is unwell for a long time, this may stunt its growth. Poor health doesn’t allow the body to reach its full potential, so take your sick dog to the veterinarian to ensure everything is alright.Overexertion is another factor to avoid, as it can injure your dog. Take care not to over-exercise your English Mastiff.Lastly, given their vast size, it is vital to allow lots of space for your Mastiff to play. This helps prevent injury and allows their muscles to develop through full and free movement.

Frequently Asked Questions

Let’s answer some of the most frequently asked questions from English Mastiff owners who just want the best for their dogs.

When will my English Mastiff stop growing?

This giant breed grows at a fast pace; many of them double in size within three months! However, they will reach full maturity slowly– somewhere around two years old. Despite this, they will continue growing even after they are four years old!Your dog’s growth rate will

How fast can my Mastiff grow?

Like when we discussed genetics, you can look at your dog’s parents and relatives to have a rough indication of how large they might grow. However, your results will likely vary. Some dogs may start out small but suddenly shoot up in weight and height later in life. Some other dogs will start larger than their littermates but then slow in growth after hitting a plateau.

Will my puppy experience growing pains?

Studies show thatLetting your dog play too roughly or exercise too much can lead to injury, which can also bring them pain. Take care to give your dog ample space to play, and do not let them overexert themselves. These measures will minimize the chance of injuries.

What are some conditions common to Mastiffs?

The most common conditions that affect growing English Mastiffs areAnother condition commonly seen in growing Mastiffs is

What if my English Mastiff isn’t the correct weight?

If your English Mastiff is not the correct weight, there are a few ways to assess the best course of action. A Mastiff’s weight is going to depend on how large they have become size-wise. You should expect them to get chunkier as they grow older. A good test to see if your dog is overweight or underweight is by checking their ribs. By lightly pressing on your dog’s ribs, you should be able to feel them, though you should not be able to see them.Too much fat will require a balanced diet, plus extra exercise. Too little fat will require veterinary assistance. An underweight dog may need deworming for internal parasites. Ultimately, it’s always a good idea to

English Mastiff

The

Appearance[edit]

With a massive body, broad skull and head of generally square appearance, it is the largest dog breed in terms of mass. It is on average slightly heavier than the Saint Bernard, although there is a considerable mass overlap between these two breeds. Though the Irish Wolfhound and Great Dane can be more than six inches taller, they are not nearly as robust.The body is large with great depth and breadth, especially between the forelegs—which causes these to be set wide apart. The length of the body taken from the point of the shoulder to the point of the buttock is greater than the height at the withers. The AKC standard height (per their website) for this breed is 30 inches (76 cm) at the shoulder for males and 27.5 inches (70 cm) (minimum) at the shoulder for females. A typical male can weigh 150–250 pounds (68–113 kg), a typical female can weigh 120–200 pounds (54–91 kg), with very large individuals reaching 300 pounds (140 kg) or more.

Coat colour standards[edit]

The former standard specified the coat should be short and close-lying. Long-haired Mastiffs, known as “Fluffies”, are caused by a recessive gene — they are occasionally seen. The AKC considers a long coat a fault but not cause for disqualification. English Mastiff colours are apricot-fawn, silver-fawn, fawn, or dark fawn-brindle, always with black on the muzzle, ears, and nose and around the eyes.The colours of the Mastiff coat are differently described by various kennel clubs, but are essentially fawn or apricot, or those colours as a base for black brindle. A black mask should occur in all cases. The fawn is generally a light “silver” shade, but may range up to a golden yellow. The apricot may be a slightly reddish hue up to a deep, rich red. The brindle markings should ideally be heavy, even and clear stripes, but may actually be light, uneven, patchy, faint or muddled. Piebald Mastiffs occur rarely. Other non-standard colours include black, blue brindle, and chocolate (brown) mask. Some Mastiffs have a heavy shading caused by dark hairs throughout the coat or primarily on the back and shoulders. This is not generally considered a fault. Brindle is dominant over solid colour, other than black, which may no longer exist as a Mastiff colour. Apricot is dominant over fawn, though that dominance may be incomplete. Most of the colour faults are recessive, though black is so rare in the Mastiff that it has never been determined whether the allele is recessive or a mutation that is dominant.The genetic basis for the variability of coat in dogs has been much studied, but all the issues have not yet been resolved.

Record size[edit]

The greatest weight ever recorded for a dog, 343 pounds (155.6 kg), was that of an English Mastiff from England named Aicama Zorba of La Susa, although claims of larger dogs, including Saint Bernards, Tibetan Mastiffs, and Caucasian ovcharkas exist.

History[edit]

The Mastiff breed has a desired temperament, which is reflected in all formal standards and historical descriptions. Sydenham Edwards wrote in 1800 in theThe American Kennel Club sums up the Mastiff breed as:

From the early 19th century to World War I[edit]

There is a ceramic and paint sculpture of a mastiff-like dog from Mesopotamia region during the Kassite period (mid-2nd millennium B.C.).These dogs may be related to the dogs that fought lions, tigers, bears, and gladiators in Roman arenas.The turn-of-the-millennium Greek historian Strabo reported that dogs were exported from Britain for the purpose of game hunting, and that these dogs were also used by the Celts as war dogs.The Alaunt is likely to have been another genetic predecessor to the English Mastiff. Introduced by the Normans, these dogs were developed by the Alans, who had migrated into France (then known as Gaul) due to pressure by the Huns at the start of the 5th century. Intriguingly they were known from the Romans to live in a region (the Pontic-Caspian Steppe) about 700 km to the north of the region where the Assyrians once lived. Again, any canine connections are speculative.The linguistic origin of the name “Mastiff” is unclear. Many claim that it evolved from the Anglo-Saxon word “masty”, meaning “powerful”.In 1570, Conrad Heresbach, inDogs known as Bandogs, who were tied (bound) close to houses, were of the Mastiff type.They were described by John CaiusThe naturalist Christopher Merret in his 1666 workWhen in 1415 Sir Peers Legh was wounded in the Battle of Agincourt, his Mastiff stood over and protected him for many hours through the battle. The Mastiff was later returned to Legh’s home and was the foundation of the Lyme Hall Mastiffs. Five centuries later this pedigree figured prominently in founding the modern breed.

After World War I[edit]

In 1918, a dog called Beowulf, bred in Canada from British imports Priam of Wingfied and Parkgate Duchess, was registered by the American Kennel Club, starting a slow re-establishment of the breed in North America. Priam and Duchess, along with fellow imports Ch Weland, Thor of the Isles, Caractacus of Hellingly and Brutus of Saxondale, ultimately contributed a total of only two descendants who would produce further offspring: Buster of Saxondale and Buddy. There were, however, a number of other imports in the period between the wars and in the early days of the Second World War Those who can still be found in modern pedigrees were 12 in number,In the British Isles during World War II, virtually all Mastiff breeding stopped due to the rationing of meat. After the war, such puppies as were produced mostly succumbed to canine distemper, for which no vaccine was developed until 1950.After the war, animals from North America (predominantly from Canada) were imported into Britain. Therefore, all Mastiffs in the late 1950s were descended from Nydia and the 14 Mastiffs previously mentioned, with each all-male bloodline going back to Ch. Crown Prince. It has been alleged that the Mastiff was bred with other more numerically significant giant breeds, such as Bullmastiffs and St. Bernards, with the justification that these were considered close relatives to the Mastiff. In 1959, a Dogue de Bordeaux, Fidelle de Fenelon, was imported from France to the U.S., registered as a Mastiff, and became the 16th animal in the post-war gene pool.

See also[edit]