Full Grown Corn Snake?

The corn snake is a mouse hunter commonly found in cornfields, hence their name. These snakes are generally low-key and easy to care for. They are not vicious, and they are never a threat to humans, which makes them awesome pets for households of all types. Corn snakes come in a wide variety of different colors and patterns, making them favorites of snake collectors and enthusiasts. The southern United States is where these snakes originated from, but they can be found living in captivity all around the world today. Lets take a look at how big corn snakes can get.

Image Credit: Frauke Feind, Pixabay In the wild, corn snakes eat mice. There are a couple of factors that could affect the rate and quality of growth that a corn snake experiences as they age.

A tank that is too large while they are babies can make them feel afraid and regress to hiding spaces, where they do not spend much time stretching and moving. Image Credit: Frauke Feind, Pixabay All snakes maintain their body temperature by obtaining heat from their environment. A lack of nutrition can negatively affect the growth rate of the snake if temperatures stay too low for too long.

A heat lamp that helps keep the habitat stable temperature-wise will allow a corn snake to consistently maintain their body temperature. If they are fed other sources of food instead of mice as their main staple, chances are that they will not grow as expected throughout their life. Making sure that mice are the main staple of this snakes diet will help ensure optimal growth and health.

Oliver (Ollie) Jones A zoologist and freelance writer living in South Australia with his partner Alex, their dog Pepper, and their cat Steve (who declined to be pictured). Ollie, originally from the USA, holds his masters degree in wildlife biology and moved to Australia to pursue his career and passion but has found a new love for working online and writing about animals of all types.

How long does it take for a corn snake to fully grow?

How Long Will It Take For A Corn Snake To Reach Maturity? Adult corn snakes can range in length from 3.5 to 5 feet. When they hatch, neonate corn snakes will measure between 8 and 12 inches. It takes approximately three years for corn snakes to reach their adult length and sexual maturity.

Are corn snakes friendly?

Corn snakes can be considered as friendly species of snakes. They are small, docile, and generally like to be handled when they learn to recognize and trust their owner.

How big should my corn snake be?

Corn snakes hatch at 8 to 12 inches long, and most eventually reach 4 to 5.5 feet in length.

Are you a new corn snake owner and youre wondering how old your corn snake is? Are you thinking of buying a corn snake and are concerned about how big it will grow?

Corn snake owners have come up with some unique ways to get an accurate measurement of their pets, these include: Both sexes are the same size and weight at birth, but this can change quickly within the first year with females reaching up to 100 grams, while males tend to stay between 35 and 80 grams.

In order to achieve an accurate weight, weigh your snake the day before feeding and keep this consistent throughout their measuring and weighing, so you always get accurate measurements. Baby corn snakes will need to eat more with one prey every 5 to 7 days, while adults need to be fed every 1 to 2 weeks. Remember that measurements and weights are just an estimate, an average based on the species.

For interest, the oldest corn snake ever recorded was 32 years of age. This is a long-term pet commitment with corn snakes living an estimated 20 years in captivity. Corn snakes grow fastest in the first year of their lives, which is why they tend to shed more as babies and juveniles, than as adults.

Once they reach adult size, males are larger than the female in terms of length. Due to the fact that both the male and female are the same color, you cannot use this to identify the sex. From just before 6 months you can have a professional probe test if it is important for you to know if you have a male or female snake.

There are a number of factors that will influence your corn snakes growth and size. Its important to provide a comfortable and natural habitat where your snake can grow and thrive. Captive-bred snakes tend to be slightly smaller, which has to do with their diets and home confines.

The first thing that can have an influence on size and growth is the enclosure you keep your corn snake in. If you are nervous about your corn snake not having enough wiggle room and resenting you later in life, then it is fine to allow them a bigger cage. If your temperature and humidity levels are inaccurate for your corn snake, then it may lead to lack of appetite and illness, this can impact the overall growth size of your pet.

Focus on ensuring you provide a warm enclosure of 85F with a humidity level of between 40% and 50%. Humidity aids in shredding and ensures your snake remains healthy and happy. How often you feed your snake and the quality of food will impact growth size and development.

Some corn snake owners feed their hatchlings up to three times weekly, you can determine your corn snakes appetite and feed accordingly.

The corn snake (Pantherophis guttatus) is a North American species of rat snake that subdues its small prey by constriction.[4][5] It is found throughout the southeastern and central United States. Though superficially resembling the venomous copperhead and often killed as a result of this mistaken identity, corn snakes lack functional venom and are harmless. Corn snakes are beneficial to humans [6] by helping to control populations of wild rodent pests that damage crops and spread disease.[7]

The latter has since been split off as its own species ( P. emoryi ), but is still occasionally treated as a subspecies of the corn snake by hobbyists. Wild corn snakes prefer habitats such as overgrown fields, forest openings, trees, palmetto flatwoods, and abandoned or seldom-used buildings and farms, from sea level to as high as 6,000 feet.

Typically, these snakes remain on the ground until the age of four months but can ascend trees, cliffs, and other elevated surfaces. It has been found that corn snakes (along with other colubrids) reach sexual maturity by means of size, as opposed to age. Egg-laying occurs slightly more than a month after mating, with 1224 eggs deposited into a warm, moist, hidden location.

Corn snakes are temperate zone colubrids, and share a reproductive pattern were females increase their feeding during summer and fall. During the fall season corn snakes maintain a body temperatures that was 3.0 degrees Celsius higher than the surrounding environment after consuming a meal. Corns snakes demonstrate nocturnal patterns, and use the warm ground at night to thermoregulate, therefore heat mats replicate this source.

Like many species of the Colubridae , corn snakes exhibit defensive tail vibration behavior. However; a study conducted by Dr. David Holzman of the University of Rochester in 1999 found that snakes’ cognitive abilities (in specific regards to spatial learning) actually rival that of birds and rodents. [36] Holzman challenged the typical testing method that was being used by biologists to examine snakes’ navigational abilities, claiming the structure of the arena itself was biologically in favor of rodents.

He hypothesized that if the typical arena being used to test the animals was modified to cater to snake‘s innate biologically driven goals, thus providing them with problem sets that they would likely encounter in their natural environment, this would give a more accurate view of their intelligence . The study involved testing 24 captive-bred corn snakes, placing them in a wide-open tub with walls too high for them to climb out. An intense light was positioned to shine directly on the arena, exploiting the snake‘s natural aversion to bright open spaces.

Not only did they find that, when given proper incentive, the snakes exhibited an acute ability to learn and navigate their surroundings. A docile young corn snake (an introduced species) captured from the wild on the island of Nevis , West Indies, in 2009After many generations of selective breeding , captive bred corn snakes are found in a wide variety of different colors and patterns. These result from recombining the dominant and recessive genes that code for proteins involved in chromatophore development, maintenance, or function.

Normal / Carolina / Wildtype Orange with black lines around red-colored saddle markings going down their back and with black-and-white checkered bellies. Regional diversity is found in wild-caught corn snakes, the most popular being the Miami and Okeetee Phases. Miami Phase (originates in the Florida Wildtype) Usually smaller corn snakes with some specimens having highly contrasting light silver to gray ground color with red or orange saddle markings surrounded in black.

Okeetee Phase Characterized by deep red dorsal saddle marks, surrounded by very black borders on a bright orange ground color. Some on the market originate solely from selectively breeding corn snakes from the Okeetee Hunt Club. Ideal specimens are high contrast snakes with light orange to yellow background and dark orange/red saddles.

The earlier Blood Red corn snakes tended to have large clutches of smaller than average eggs that produce hard-to-feed offspring, though this is no longer the case. The inherited recessive mutation of lacking erythrin (red, yellow and orange) pigments produces a corn snake that is mostly black, gray and brown. When mature, many anerythristic type A corn snakes develop yellow on their neck regions, which is a result of the carotenoids in their diet.

Cinder Originated with Upper Keys corn snakes and, as such, are often built slimmer than most other morphs. Hypomelanistic (or Hypo for short) Carry a recessive trait that reduces the dark pigments, causing the reds, whites and oranges to become more vivid. Amelanistic striped corn snake Motley Has a clear belly and an “inverted” spotting pattern.

Aztec , Zigzag and Banded Selectively bred multigenetic morphs that are not dependent on a single gene. Snow (amelanistic + Anerythristic) As hatchlings, this color variation is composed of white and pink blotches. These corn snakes are predominantly white and tend to have yellow neck and throat regions when mature (due to carotenoid retention in their diet).

Light blotches and background colors have subtle shades of beige, ivory, pink, green or yellow. Ghost (Hypomelanistic + Anerythristic type A) Exhibit varying shades of grays and browns on a lighter background. Opal (amelanistic + Lavender) Look like Blizzard corn snakes once mature, with pink to purple highlights.

Granite (Diffused + Anerythristic) Tend to be varying shades of gray as adults, with males often having pink highlights. Scaleless corn snakes are homozygous for a recessive mutation of the gene responsible for scale development. “Phylogeographic analysis of the cornsnake (Elaphe guttata) complex as inferred from maximum likelihood and Bayesian analyses”.

Molecular Systematics and Phylogeny of Old and New World ratsnakes, Elaphe Auct., and related genera (Reptilia, Squamata, Colubridae) . “Neogene diversification and taxonomic stability in the snake tribe Lampropeltini (Serpentes: Colubridae)”. ), Hauppauge NY: Barron’s Educational Series, ISBN 978-0-7641-3407-4 ^ “Jungle Corn Snakes” .

^ Peterson Field Guide – Western Reptiles and Amphibians – 3rd Edition ^ “9 Interesting Facts About Corn Snakes” . ^ The Captive Breeding of Colubrid Snakes:
This document, written by Steven T. Osborne, was originally published as a 4 part series in the 1982 edition ( Volume 4: Number 3,4,7, & 9 ) of the San Diego Herpetological Society Newsletter. “Eliciting a predatory response in the eastern corn snake (Pantherophis guttatus) using live and inanimate sensory stimuli: implications for managing invasive populations” (PDF) .

Corn snakes are one of the most popular of all pet snakes and for good reason. Their extremely variable and gorgeous colors and patterns, ease of care and breeding, and generally docile dispositions have earned corn snakes their rightful, premier place in herpetoculture. The size of mature corn snakes is just right: big and hardy enough to accept regular handling, yet not large enough to intimidate a novice or child. Easy to breed and care for with an endless array of genetic traits, corn snakes offer something for the newest snakekeeper, yet they also challenge those with years of experience.

Although it is normal for baby corn snakes to flee, hide or defend themselves, it is also true that they have no real ability to harm you. It is important to give a new corn snake a few weeks to settle into its new home and into a regular feeding routine before stressing it with unnecessary handling.

Once the corn snake begins to realize that you are not going to eat it, and also that it needs to calm down to regain the security of its quiet cage, it will usually tame quickly and become very used to handling.

Facts About Corn Snakes

Corn snakes are also sometimes referred to as red rat snakes, as they are closely related to rat snakes, which are larger than them. Usually docile, the corn snake is easy for even children to handle. However, they shake their tails and make a rattling noise when they are feeling threatened. These snakes are known for being excellent escape artists and will spend much of their time trying to figure out how to get out of their habitat if they are feeling bored or boxed in.Therefore, corn snakes need plenty of space to sprawl out and explore inside their habitats. The size of their habitat may have to change as time goes on, based on their growth. They love having dark places to hide during the day, as they are most active at dawn and dusk. A heat lamp should be utilized to keep the snake’s habitat warmed to about 85 degrees during the day and 75 degrees at night. Corn snakes tend to like it nice and humid too.

Ideal Diet for Optimal Growth

In the wild, corn snakes eat mice. Therefore, this should be their main staple for optimal growth while living in captivity. Corn snakes should be fed about once a week. If a corn snake will not eat their offerings right away, the food should be taken away and offered again the next day until it does get eaten. Adults snakes can eat up to three mice in one sitting. Both live and dead mice can be offered at mealtime. Frozen mice should be completely defrosted before serving.Dead mice can be held by the tails using tongs so the snake can “strike” their prey, like in the wild. In addition to mice, corn snakes can eat quail eggs as snacks. They can also occasionally eat rats and other small rodents in exchange for mice. But mice should always be their primary source of calories.

What Other Factors Affect Corn Snake Growth?

There are a couple of factors that could affect the rate and quality of growth that a corn snake experiences as they age. Here is what you need to know.The size of a corn snake’s tank can affect their growth as time goes on. A tank that is too large while they are babies can make them feel afraid and regress to hiding spaces, where they do not spend much time stretching and moving. A lack of movement and stretching can stunt a snake’s growth. A tank that is too small can also stunt their growth. Therefore, baby corn snakes should live in a 5-gallon tank. Once they become adults, they should live in a 20-gallon tank. A 10-gallon tank can be used for the middle stage.All snakes maintain their body temperature by obtaining heat from their environment. Improper temperatures that make it hard for a corn snake to maintain their body temperature may grow slowly because so much of their energy is being used to maintain their body temperature.Also, if a snake is too cold, they will not eat because they need heat to digest their food. A lack of nutrition can negatively affect the growth rate of the snake if temperatures stay too low for too long. A heat lamp that helps keep the habitat stable temperature-wise will allow a corn snake to consistently maintain their body temperature.Corn snakes predominantly eat mice. If they are fed other sources of food instead of mice as their main staple, chances are that they will not grow as expected throughout their life. Making sure that mice are the main staple of this snake’s diet will help ensure optimal growth and health.

Are Corn Snakes Venomous When Fully Grown?

Corn snakes are not venomous, but they do pack a punch when it comes to biting. Their striking range is about half of their body length, which can be quite far. While their bite does hurt, the injury tends to heal itself within a few days without the need for medical assistance.These snakes tend to bite when they feel threatened or cornered. They should be handled from a young age to reduce stress when being handled as adults. Regular handling will reduce the risk of bite injuries among friends and family who are just getting to know the snake.

Measuring Tape

Take the measuring tape and do the same as with the string.Place the measuring tape along the length of your snake to get a measurement which can help you identify age quickly and effectively.

Measuring Tape Against A Wall

Put the measuring tape against a wall and let your snake slither the length of the wall to get an estimated size.Corn snakes can live up to twenty years in captivity but should be fully grown by the age of two years.

Different growth rate between male and female?

Male and female corn snakes do have some differences in terms of their growth rates with females weighing more than males from an early stage, even though males tend to grow longer once they are fully grown.Both sexes are the same size and weight at birth, but this can change quickly within the first year with females reaching up to 100 grams, while males tend to stay between 35 and 80 grams.Once they are fully grown, males will weigh more, often between 700 and 900 grams, with females only reaching up to 700 grams.In order to achieve an accurate weight, weigh your snake the day before feeding and keep this consistent throughout their measuring and weighing, so you always get accurate measurements.

When do they grow fast?

From the above corn snake growth chart, you will notice a faster growth rate from your snake in the first 12 months as they eat more during this period.Baby corn snakes will need to eat more with one prey every 5 to 7 days, while adults need to be fed every 1 to 2 weeks.

When do they stop growing?

While the corn snake can live up to 12 years or more in captivity, they should reach full length by the time they reach 2 years of age.

Longest corn snake

Remember that measurements and weights are just an estimate, an average based on the species.The largest corn snake that was ever recorded was 72 inches in length, that’s 1.8 meters.For interest, the oldest corn snake ever recorded was 32 years of age. This is a long-term pet commitment with corn snakes living an estimated 20 years in captivity.

Enclosure

The first thing that can have an influence on size and growth is the enclosure you keep your corn snake in.Adults should be kept in nothing smaller than a 20 gallon tank, though bigger is always better. If you have space, opt for the biggest tank you can fit.It is suggested that a fullgrown corn snake be kept in a 40-gallon tank.If you are nervous about your corn snake not having enough wiggle room and resenting you later in life, then it is fine to allow them a bigger cage.

Temperature and Humidity

If your temperature and humidity levels are inaccurate for your corn snake, then it may lead to lack of appetite and illness, this can impact the overall growth size of your pet.Focus on ensuring you provide a warm enclosure of 85ºF with a humidity level of between 40% and 50%. Humidity aids in shredding and ensures your snake remains healthy and happy.Use a digital thermometer and hygrometer to help you monitor levels regularly and with ease.

Corn snake

TheThe corn snake is named for the species’ regular presence near grain stores, where it preys on mice and rats that eat harvested corn (maize).

Description[edit]

Adult corn snakes have a body length of 61–182 cm (2.00–5.97 ft).

Taxonomy[edit]

Until 2002, the corn snake was considered to have two subspecies: the nominate subspecies (

Natural habitat[edit]

Wild corn snakes prefer habitats such as overgrown fields, forest openings, trees, palmetto flatwoods, and abandoned or seldom-used buildings and farms, from sea level to as high as 6,000 feet. Typically, these snakes remain on the ground until the age of four months but can ascend trees, cliffs, and other elevated surfaces.In colder regions, snakes brumate during winter. However, in the more temperate climate along the coast, they shelter in rock crevices and logs during cold weather; they also can find shelter in small, closed spaces, such as under a house, and come out on warm days to soak up the heat of the sun. During cold weather, snakes are less active, so they hunt less.

Reproduction[edit]

It has been found that corn snakes (along with other colubrids) reach sexual maturity by means of size, as opposed to age.Corn snakes are relatively easy to breed. Although not necessary, they are usually put through a cooling (also known as brumation) period that takes 60–90 days to get them ready for breeding. Corn snakes brumate around 10 to 16 °C (50 to 61 °F) in a place where they cannot be disturbed and with little sunlight.Corn snakes usually breed shortly after the winter cooling. The male courts the female primarily with tactile and chemical cues, then everts one of his hemipenes, inserts it into the female, and ejaculates his sperm. If the female is ovulating, the eggs will be fertilized and she will begin sequestering nutrients into the eggs, then secreting a shell.Egg-laying occurs slightly more than a month after mating, with 12–24 eggs deposited into a warm, moist, hidden location. Once laid, the adult snake abandons the eggs and does not return to them. The eggs are oblong with leathery, flexible shells. About 10 weeks after laying, the young snakes use a specialized scale called an egg tooth to slice slits in the egg shell, from which they emerge at about 5 in long.Reproduction in captivity has to be done correctly so the clutch’s mortality rate decreases. This includes accurate sexing, establishing proper pre-breeding conditioning, and timely pairing of adults. Corn snakes are temperate zone colubrids, and share a reproductive pattern were females increase their feeding during summer and fall. This is only applies to corn snakes that are sexually mature, which typically indicates the snake is around 75 cm (30 inches) in length or weight 250 g.

Diet[edit]

Like all snakes, corn snakes are carnivorous and, in the wild, they eat every few days. While most corn snakes eat small rodents, such as the white-footed mouse, they may also eat other reptiles, or amphibians, or climb trees to find unguarded bird eggs.Seasons play a large role in the thermal regulation patterns of corn snakes, which is the main mechanism of digestion for snakes. During the fall season corn snakes maintain a body temperatures that was 3.0 degrees Celsius higher than the surrounding environment after consuming a meal.American “rat snakes”, such as

Intelligence and behavior[edit]

Like many species of the Colubridae, corn snakes exhibit defensive tail vibration behavior.However; a study conducted by Dr. David Holzman of the University of Rochester in 1999 found that snakes’ cognitive abilities (in specific regards to spatial learning) actually rival that of birds and rodents.The study involved testing 24 captive-bred corn snakes, placing them in a wide-open tub with walls too high for them to climb out. Eight holes were cut out underneath, with one hole leading to a shelter. An intense light was positioned to shine directly on the arena, exploiting the snake‘s natural aversion to bright open spaces. This provided a biologically meaningful objective for the snakes: to seek out cozy dark shelter.Not only did they find that, when given proper incentive, the snakes exhibited an acute ability to learn and navigate their surroundings. They also found snakes rely on their sense of vision much more than many herpetologists had previously assumed. They did, however, find that younger snakes were able to more quickly locate the holes than older snakes, as the younger snakes were more resourceful in their application of senses – where the older snakes more heavily relied on their sense of sight.

In captivity[edit]

Corn snakes are one of the most popular types of snakes to keep in captivity or as pets, second only to the ball python. However, they are the most popular pet snake in Brazil. Their size, calm temperament, and ease of care contribute to this popularity. Captive corn snakes tolerate being handled by their owners, even for extended periods.

Variations[edit]

After many generations of selective breeding, captive bred corn snakes are found in a wide variety of different colors and patterns. These result from recombining the dominant and recessive genes that code for proteins involved in chromatophore development, maintenance, or function. New variations, or morphs, become available every year as breeders gain a better understanding of the genetics involved.

Corn Snake –

Corn snakes are one of the most popular of all pet snakes and for good reason. Their extremely variable and gorgeous colors and patterns, ease of care and breeding, and generally docile dispositions have earned corn snakes their rightful, premier place in herpetoculture. The size of mature corn snakes is just right: big and hardy enough to accept regular handling, yet not large enough to intimidate a novice or child. Easy to breed and care for with an endless array of genetic traits, corn snakes offer something for the newest snakekeeper, yet they also challenge those with years of experience.

Corn Snake Availability

Corn snakes are readily available at pet shops, reptile expos, online reptile shops and directly from breeders. Although wild-caught specimens usually adapt as pets, captive-bred corn snakes are highly recommended because of the beautiful color and pattern morphs available; the greater likelihood of getting a healthy, parasite-free snake; and the details about age, history and parentage that may accompany them.

Corn Snake Size

Corn snakes hatch at 8 to 12 inches long, and most eventually reach 4 to 5.5 feet in length.

Corn Snake Life Span

With proper care, a corn snake could live at least into its latter teens, and it may well live into its 20s. They are often reproductive until 10 to 12 years of age and sometimes longer.

Corn Snake Caging

Baby corn snakes can easily live in a plastic vivarium the size of a large shoebox for the first several months of their lives. Adult corn snakes need a cage at least the size of a 20-gallon long reptile terrarium, but bigger is even better. Snakes are not social animals, so cagemates are quite stressful. House only one corn snake to a cage. All snakes are escape artists, so make sure the cage is absolutely escape proof. Snake habitat products like climbing branches may be appreciated, but a couple of dark, tight reptile hides are essential to help the snake feel secure.

Corn Snake Lighting and Temperature

No special lighting is required, but natural light from nearby windows will help your corn snake adjust its day and night cycles, and its seasonal cycles. Be careful to avoid direct sunlight shining into the cage, or the temperatures could quickly become lethal.Provide a temperature gradient with a light, or undertank heat pad or cable. On the warm end 85 degrees Fahrenheit is perfect, and room temperatures (low 70s) are fine for the cool end. One long, skinny hide, such as a hollow log or PVC pipe, can be placed so one end of the hide is cool and one end is warm. Be sure to check the temperature inside the warm end of the hide — not on the glass. Temperatures can vary quite a bit within just a few inches, so thermometer and hide box placement is important.Misting the enclosure often causes fungus and mold. If the corn snake sheds its skin in pieces, increase humidity inside the hide box by adding a clump of damp moss or paper towel whenever the snake prepares to shed. Remove this damp filler in between sheds to avoid buildup of bacteria, mold, etc.

Corn Snake Substrate

Most breeders use aspen shavings as bedding because it is absorbent, soft and holds its shape when snakes burrow. Cypress mulch also works, but avoid aromatic woods such as pine or cedar. Newspaper and reptile carpet also suffice, but the corn snake tends to get under it whenever possible. Avoid sand because it may cause impactions if ingested.

Corn Snake Food

The primary natural food of corn snakes is appropriately sized rodents. Some baby corn snakes also eat lizards or an occasional frog. Adult corn snakes may eat birds or their eggs. Do not offer crickets because corn snakes don’t recognize them as food.Hatchlings normally eat newborn mice. Increase to a jumbo mouse for a large adult corn snake. Most corn snakes learn to eat previously frozen, but fully thawed out, mice. Be prepared to offer a live newborn mouse to baby corn snakes stressed by a new home or not used to thawed mice yet. It usually won’t take many times to train them to take thawed mice. Placing your corn snake and a thawed mouse in an empty container with a few air holes and closing the lid will help the snake concentrate on the food, and encourage it to eat. Be sure the lid is on tightly, and don’t put it near a heat source, or you risk overheating the snake. Cuts made into the skin of a thawed mouse ensure faster and more complete digestion. Feed baby corn snakes once every five to seven days, and feed adult corn snakes once every seven to 10 days.

Corn Snake Water

Fresh water should always be available in a shallow, heavy reptile water bowl. Clean out the bowl every few days or sooner if it is soiled. Place the bowl in a cage corner so it can be easily found as the snake cruises the cage perimeter at night.