Dogs That Look Like Wolves?

Although its hard to believe, all our most beloved canines descended from wolves, including Pugs, Chihuahuas, and Poodles! Of course, most modern dog breeds look nothing like their ancestors but instead, have their own unique blend of beauty.

Akitas are known for their unique trait of talking they rarely bark but are highly vocal in other ways, and they are fairly wary of strangers. They are also highly intelligent with a distinct stubborn trait, which makes them difficult to train and not ideally suited to novice dog owners.

Originally developed for hunting and pulling heavy loads, these dogs have a ton of energy and stamina that can be difficult to wear out. Credit: Karen Appleby, ShutterstockThe Canadian Eskimo Dog is a powerful, medium-sized Spitz-type breed that has been pulling heavy loads for miles for decades. This almost caused the extinction of the breed, but the Canadian Kennel Club stepped in and worked closely with breeders to bring these dogs back from the brink.

They are hardy animals that have a powerfully individual nature, making them excellent companions for athletic owners and outdoor enthusiasts. Credit: ullakaren, PixabayResembling a wolf in miniature, the Finnish Lapphund is a hardy, Spitz-type breed that has been used for centuries to herd reindeer. Image Credit: moorpheus, PixabayAlthough most dog lovers will recognize a German Shepherd in an instant, they are worth mentioning on this list because they still bear a somewhat close resemblance to their wolf ancestors.

They are similar in many ways to Huskies, with thick double coats, a characteristic curled-in tail, and a stubborn, independent nature that can make them difficult to train. The breeds main claim to fame was a starring role as the wolves in the TV series Game of Thrones. While they may look wild, they are in reality, loving and sweet dogs that make great family pets and bond strongly with their owners. Image Credit: coolcoolleah, PixabayKnown for their unique smile and thick coat, the Samoyed was originally bred for hunting and pulling heavy loads.

Their thick double coats, pointed ears, and distinctive markings are clear indicators of their wolf ancestry, although they are purely domesticated dogs. These animals were made to work, and they have almost unmatched energy, stamina, and strength, making them a real challenge for novice owners.

Were it legal (and in the animals best interest) to do so, Id already have a pack of African wild dogs living in my home (though Im sure my Rottie not to mention my wife would strongly reject this idea).

Im guessing that you clicked on this article because you want a dog that looks like a wolf, and you arent interested in a biology lesson about canine evolution and taxonomy. No matter the precise phylogeny of the group, dogs and wolves are very closely related critters, who exhibit a number of similarities.

Domestic dogs still possess much of the DNA that made them wolves in the first place, but most of these wolf-like traits have been switched off . This means two things: Handsome, fluffy and bigger than the husky, the malamute was also developed as a sled-pulling breed (and for hunting polar bears , of all things). Like huskies, they have high energy levels, playful personalities and the ability to coat your entire home in a layer of their fur.

For example, German shepherds with long hair tend to look more like wolves, and the larger, bulkier individuals also project a more wolf-like image than the small, lean ones do. German shepherds are sometimes clad in very wolf-like colors, including lots of gray, white and black, which helps further strengthen the resemblance. Like many of the other breeds on this list, German shepherds are shedding machines, but theyre also loving, loyal, bright, and protective, so it is easy to understand their popularity.

Although they were originally created by crossing European wolves with German shepherds, they have been recognized by the Federation Cynologique Internationale (the worlds leading international dog registry) as a distinct breed since 1981. However, this big white dog breed appears to have been created by mixing husky, malamute, and German shepherd lines. Tamaskans are pretty similar to huskies in terms of temperament and abilities, and they reportedly make good pets for families that can handle high-energy pooches.

Another wolf-hybrid that is recognized by the Federation Cynologique Internationale, Czechoslovakian wolf dogs were initially developed for the Czech military. Czechoslovakian wolfdogs are said to be trainable, although they arent border collies, and they require a dedicated owner, who is willing to spend plenty of time working with their pooch. While there arent many laws preventing people from owning huskies or malamutes, some of the other breeds on this list are the target of bans and special regulations .

Different jurisdictions enforce these rules and regulations in different ways, but hard-ass municipalities may not only fine you for owning a wolf-hybrid, they may confiscate and euthanize your pet as well . Even huskies and malamutes two of the more suitable pet breeds detailed above are a handful, and many owners are disappointed with their aloof demeanor.

Looking for a wolf-like dog breed but arent sure which one is perfect for your family? For thousands of years us humans have been fascinated with wolves. From the way they look to the way they hunt and care for their pack. We have long been in awe of their majestic nature, which is why plenty of folklore centers around them.

This is excellent news for those that are craving to be the owner of a domesticated dog inside a wolf body. Some you would double-take in the forest , and some look like cute wolf dogs that are dainty enough to fit in your purse (maybe a big one though!)

He originates from the cold lands of Siberia, where his purpose was to pull heavy sleds across vast icy expanses. His larger body is covered in extra fluffy fur, so if you arent a fan of lots of dog hair, you might not want to invite this gorgeous boy into your home. He is super cuddly and affectionate, so if youve ever fancied cuddling a wolf, this is probably your closest (and safest!)

The result was much different , and although he is vigilant and suspicious of strangers, he is more cuddly and loving, similar to his domesticated parent. He is also used in search and rescue, herding, agility, tracking, drafting, and working dog sports too. A Dutch breeder created him in the 1930s, and he is also a mix of wild European wolves and German Shepherds.

Again, he is not for the first time owner, and he requires several hours of intense exercise to keep his body and mind happy. Northern Inuits were used because they are the closest looking wolf-like dogs that were friendly enough to work on set safely with children around. They are another new breed created in the 1980s, and it is thought that they are a mix of the Husky, Alaskan Malamute, and the German Shepherd.

He is an intensely energetic and intelligent dog who needs to be placed with a family that can spend a lot of time with him. This cute and cuddly pooch makes a great addition to active families and those with children. He is another ancient sled dog who can pull one and a half times his weight, as well as an extra special purpose .

If you arent a fan of the remnants of a white coat on your outfit or furniture, this boy is not for you because he is a heavy shedder. Thankfully, the sides of his mouth turn upwards to prevent drooling, so except for his hair, he is a clean pup. He is alert and enthusiastic and happy to snuggle in the evening after a hard days work protecting his family.

He prefers the quiet, cuddly life with his family, and doesnt like to be the center of attention. Seppalas have longer legs and a leaner body, and his ears are taller and set closer together, giving him a wilder wolfy look. They are hardy dogs, bred to stand up so some of the most punishing cold mountain weather conditions.

Later on, they actually introduced the Canadian White Shepherd and the Czechoslovakian Wolfdog (another dog on this list) to breed additional genetic diversity for health reasons. They are more docile and have lower energy levels than standard German Shepherds, making them a good fit for families . The American Alsatian breed was achieved by initially crossing the German Shepherd and Alaskan Malamute.

Firstly, with the increasingly popular desire of welcoming a wolf-like dog into our homes, brings the rise of dodgy breeders.

Dogs (Canis familiaris) are the descendants of wolves and are classified as a subspecies of the grey wolf (Canis lupus). Recent genetic studies, however, have shown that dogs descend from an extinct genus that diverged from modern-day grey wolves about 40,000 years ago.

If you long to run with the wolves, I’d suggest getting a dog that looks like a wolf instead. Because of their close genetic similarity, dogs and wolves share many physical traits.

Wolves, however, are stronger with higher levels of energy and stamina. Wolves are stubborn, erratic, difficult to train, and a danger to children and other small animals. These qualities make them a poor choice to keep as a guard dog or household pet.

If you long to run with the wolves, I’d suggest getting a dog that looks like a wolf instead. Alaskan Malamute Siberian Husky Czechoslovakian Wolfdog Kugsha Samoyed Tamaskan Canadian Eskimo Dog Northern Inuit Dog Utonagan German Shepherd Saarloos Wolfdog Originally bred to haul heavy freight over long distances, the Alaskan Malamute is a big and powerful dog, weighing up to 45 kg.

Its friendliness and lack of barking make it a popular choice for pet owners. The Malamute is a very intelligent and loyal dog, but because it was bred to survive in harsh conditions, it is also incredibly resourceful and independent. The Malamute may not be a great fit for families that have other pets, particularly small ones since the breed does have a fairly developed prey drive.

Physically, the dog has a two-inch-long, thick double coat and facial markings like a wolf. Huskies are a very loyal, intelligent, and sturdy working breed. They were originally bred by the Chukchi Tribe in Siberia to haul heavy loads.

They are a very energetic and active dog that shares many of the same behavioral and temperamental characteristics of their wolf ancestors. For instance, they typically howl rather than bark, are known for being escape artists, and feel a powerful need to belong to a “pack.” The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog is a relatively new breed, a hybrid between German Shepherds and Carpathian wolves.

The goal was to create a breed with the strength and stamina of a wolf with the temperament and intelligence of the German Shepherd. Czechoslovakian Wolfdogs are very social and develop strong bonds with their families. While good with other pets, you will need to watch them when encountering strange animals.

Kugsha, or Amerindian Malamutes, are native to the United States and are wolf hybrids. They are very strong, larger and longer than Siberian Huskies but not like Alaskan Malamute. While Kugshas are very loyal and develop strong relationships with their owners, they are not a good dog for families with small children due to their predatory nature.

Also, they need a lot of exercise and can get destructive if they do not get enough physical activity. Samoyeds are Russian breed of dog they get their name from the Samoyedic peoples of Siberia. One of their distinguishing characteristics is the “Sammy smile,” which very noticeable because of the contrast between its white coat and black lips.

Samoyeds are calm, devoted, very friendly and pleasant dogs and love everyone. They love hiking, tracking and keeping their owners warm by sleeping on top of them at night. Unfortunately, Samoyeds have a number of congenital health problems including hip dysplasia, diabetes, and kidney disease.

They’re very smart, easily trainable and highly social, so they shouldn’t be left alone for long periods of time. They also require quite a bit of exercise and can turn destructive if they don’t get enough physical stimulation. However, they are not great fits for families with other small dogs, because they have fairly high prey drives.

They also require an enormous amount of exercise, often much more than the typical owner can give. This dog has a medium build and its shape and coloring very much resembles that of a wolf. They also tend toward having separation anxiety, but training at a young age can take care of that.

They are a mix of three dogs-the Alaskan Malamute, German Shepherd, and Siberian Husky. They are very friendly and intelligent dogs and tend to get along well with people, including children. They are also fairly energetic and require significant exerciseat least a daily walk or job.

That said, be careful about exercising them in the heat: this breed does best in colder weather. The German Shepherd Dogs are one of world’s most recognized and popular breeds. They are very energetic, eager to learn, and very much need a job or task to perform.

The Saarloos Wolfhound is strong and energetic and has a powerful neck, broad head, and long legs. Its a strong-willed dog and needs a very experienced owner capable of providing it the necessary exercise and discipline. Wild wolves survive on meals of deer, elk, moose, bison, and other natural prey.

This aggressive behavior also depends on the number of generations that your wolf dog is away from its first breeding. That said, you should check with your vet to see that the fruit you offer is safe for your pet. They also undergo what some might call “normal wear and tear”; they’ll experience joint pain as they get older, especially if they are eating an unhealthy diet.

This domestication may actually have happened twice, producing groups of dogs descended from two unique common ancestors. Since the first dogs settled with humans, their relationship has been an evolving phenomenon, resulting in many new breeds and new behaviors. It’s amazing that there is a genetic connection between a wolf that roamed the tundra 35,000 years ago to modern dogs, but it’s true.

While scientists once thought that dogs descended from gray wolves, now, through genetic studies, researchers discovered that dogs and wolves share a common ancestor instead of a direct lineage. The common ancestor between dogs and wolves was a prehistoric wolf that lived in Europe or Asia sometime between 9,000 to 34,000 years ago. Still, no one knows exactly what kind of wolf gave rise to all of the amazing dog breeds living today.

Wolves have evolved into numerous species that span the globe. Over the last 30,000 years, wolf DNA, through natural selection, has been tweaked little by little to make them successful in nearly every environment. Their favorite prey is large hoofed mammals, such as deer, elk, moose, caribou and bison.

For example, grey wolves hunt mostly large, hoofed animals including different kinds of deer, mountain goats, moose, elk, and bison, but they will also hunt hares, beavers, birds, and fish. Their coats are made up of wooly fur to provide insulation and long guard hairs to keep out moisture. The gray wolf’s large paws have fleshy pads and claws for traction and can spread to provide better support in snow.

Most importantly, wolves developed cooperative hunting in order to bring down large prey. They likely approached us when scavenging around garbage dumps on the edge of human settlements. In fact, friendliness caused odd things to happen in the wolves.

Domestication gave them splotchy coats, floppy ears, wagging tails. Cultures around the world have many different views when it comes to the meaning of wolves. In fact, Native American cultures have long seen the wolf as both a powerful animal and a source of inspiration.

The Ojibwe believed that a wolfman spirit made the Great Plains for them and for the other animals, too. Also, the Hopi honor a wolf katsina, a spiritual being who serves as a guardian for sacred dancers. Wolves have the ability to make quick and firm emotional attachments.

Thus, wolves teach us to trust our hearts and minds, and to have control over our own lives. The wolf is an incredible spirit animal, which has an important symbolic meaning. The wolf totem symbolizes strong connection with your instincts or intuition.

Dire wolves in dreams represent gangs or intimidating groups. Dreaming that a wolf is protecting you means that you are receiving help or support from an unexpected or unlikely source. In the lower 48 states, gray wolves were hunted to near extinction, though some populations survived and others have since been reintroduced.

Few gray wolves survive in Europe, though many live in Alaska, Canada, and Asia. The gray wolf lives today in a diverse range of environments, including tundra, mountain areas, woodlands, forests, grasslands, and deserts. Canis have adapted to numerous environments and are, inarguably, one of the most successful mammal genus on the planet.

If the wolf does not run away immediately, continue making yourself large, keeping eye contact, and backing away. Although wolf attacks do occur, their frequency varies with geographical location and historical period. Gray wolf attacks are rare because wolves are often subsequently killed, or even extirpated in reaction by human beings.

Jackals are medium-sized omnivorous mammals of the genus Canis, which also includes wolves, coyotes and the domestic dog. The dhole is a canid native to Central, South and Southeast Asia. The red fox is the largest of the true foxes and one of the most widely distributed members of the order Carnivora, being present across the entire Northern Hemisphere from the Arctic Circle to North Africa, North America and Eurasia.

The raccoon dog, also known as the mangut or tanuki is a canid indigenous to East Asia. Despite its peculiar appearance, it is a close relative of true foxes. Its range is primarily in the Southwestern United States and northern and central Mexico.

Some mammalogists classify it as conspecific with the swift fox, V. velox, but molecular systematics imply that the two species are distinct. It is well adapted to living in cold environments, and is best known for its thick, warm fur that is also used as camouflage The fennec fox or fennec is a small crepuscular fox found in the Sahara of North Africa, the Sinai Peninsula, South West Israel and the Arabian desert.

Its most distinctive feature is its unusually large ears, which also serve to dissipate heat. The maned wolf is the largest canid of South America. Comunque una delle 3 razze canine che per DNA ed aspetto fisico si avvicina di pi a quello del lupo grigio l’Akita giapponese o meglio conosciuto come Akita Inu e nella lista manca del tutto!!!

Le somiglianze estetiche lasciano il tempo che trovano, secondo me possono essere un tipo di valutazione ma gli aspetti fondamentali sono quelli caratteriali che rendono un cane dometico pi simile al lupo. thanks for including a yearly average cost of owning these beautiful breeds. sadly, for most people (like me) this is something to take into account before committing to owning a dog for 10 or hopefully more years.

OMGOSH I am totally begging my mum for a Utanogan dog style XD l absolute love Alaskan malamute dogs and l wish to have one some time. l was hoping to buy a german shepherd but they require extra time and attention with you.

oh, and lone white wolf, to buy my husky, i went to this lady’s house and bought the piebald husky for 1200, it costed 1500, but we didnt want it to have birth cuz we couldnt take care of them so we got her for 1200 since no babies. Also some of these dogs are banned in other countries, So first check if the breed you are looking for is allowed to your place. This is a very informative and detailed article, but the picture for the kugsha dog actually shows a Shikoku dog, which should also be on the list as it is basically a wolf-coloured shiba inu.

I dint au orice experien, cunotine despre “Alieu”. Dar mi place s vd imaginea dac nu te deranjeaz? I love wolf type dogs.Their eyes are very bright .They are white,black grey in colour .They live in cold places.Me and my father want to buy a wolf type dog but, we can not buy because they live in cold places.

Your specification sounds that can be a NAID dog or mixed breed. Great pictures; really liked comparison and “cautions” to help educate potential owners. Many years ago my parents bought a husky and didn’t know the traits and needs of the breed.

so imagine their surprise when the new puppy stated digging holes etc due to lack of exercise and training. Is there any dog of this type suitable for Indian climate (tropical) and tiny or toy in size . I agree with you they look like Wolf and I had added them in video presentation.

I apologize…..the American Alsatian was bred to look like the dire wolf. Since researchers can’t agree on its appearance….i thought this slightly humorous. Yes i agree, Tamaskan are new breed .. they just became famous from movie “Game of thrones”.

Interesting article; loved the photos of the beautiful dogs and wolves. The Tamaskan is not, and to my knowledge, has never been, recognized by the AKC (American Kennel Club). Given the age of the lineage maybe you mean there is evidence that the species diverged 40 000 years ago?

The dog you call a Kugsha is really a picture of a Shikoku a Japanese breed. Wow, what a tremendous read and fascinating hub, I really loved it, so well written and entertaining and helpful. But this article will be useful for them, who are interested to have a pet like wolf .Wish you happy time with your short coated Hounds 🙂

I love the GSD, and could live with any dog breed yet, I voted no ‘I would not like to own one of these dogs‘ because I am too old to groom and my heart is solidly, and totally with short coated Hounds. You can check for Siberian Husky and German Shepherd and American Alsatian, they will be allowed. Three of those breeds you can’t legally own in Michigan because they are part wolf.

I’m not sure where you gather your facts, but in NO circle is a husky recognized as a good watch dog. Please reference the Siberian Husky Club of America site below and read the first 3 paragraphs. The foremost experts in the breed are very clear about Siberian behavior.

[We can’t compare Pit bull / Rottweiler with pug and poodle].

1. Akita Inu

A large and powerful dog originally developed in Japan as a guard dog and for hunting, the Akita is as loyal as they come, with both the appearance and presence of their wolf ancestry. They are courageous animals that have a natural protective instinct leading them to go to almost any measure to protect their family. Akitas are known for their unique trait of talking — they rarely bark but are highly vocal in other ways, and they are fairly wary of strangers.

2. Alaskan Malamute

Alaskan Malamutes are powerful animals and one of the oldest breeds of sled dogs. They are also highly intelligent with a distinct stubborn trait, which makes them difficult to train and not ideally suited to novice dog owners. With their thick black-and-grey-on-white coat, these dogs are often thought to be part wolf and have even been used as such in movies, but they are 100% domestic. Originally developed for hunting and pulling heavy loads, these dogs have a ton of energy and stamina that can be difficult to wear out.

3. Canadian Eskimo Dog

The Canadian Eskimo Dog is a powerful, medium-sized Spitz-type breed that has been pulling heavy loads for miles for decades. They are robust dogs with incredible stamina and were the primary sled dogs before the introduction of faster Siberian Huskies into the northern parts of Canada. This almost caused the extinction of the breed, but the Canadian Kennel Club stepped in and worked closely with breeders to bring these dogs back from the brink.

4. Czechoslovakian Wolfdog

Despite having “wolf” in their name, the Czechoslovakian Wolfdog is all domestic, although they resemble a wolf in striking ways. They are incredibly versatile animals that have been used in a wide variety of disciplines, including patrolling, search and rescue, and herding. They are hardy animals that have a powerfully individual nature, making them excellent companions for athletic owners and outdoor enthusiasts.

5. Finnish Lapphund

Resembling a wolf in miniature, the Finnish Lapphund is a hardy, Spitz-type breed that has been used for centuries to herd reindeer. Although they are small, they are surprisingly muscular and agile for their size, with plenty of speed and agility that serves them well while herding. They are highly friendly little dogs, although mildly wary of new faces. They love nothing more than being close to their owners, so much so that they swiftly become depressed without them.

6. German Shepherd

Although most dog lovers will recognize a German Shepherd in an instant, they are worth mentioning on this list because they still bear a somewhat close resemblance to their wolf ancestors. They are large, powerful animals that are supremely loyal and intelligent, and as such, they have been used widely in police and military service. They make great family pets too and are known to be loving, gentle, and protective of their human family.

7. Greenland Dog

The Greenland Dog is a muscular, heavy-set, and powerful animal that has been used as a working dog in the cold climate of Greenland for hundreds of years. They are similar in many ways to Huskies, with thick double coats, a characteristic curled-in tail, and a stubborn, independent nature that can make them difficult to train. They are fairly rare nowadays because their job has been replaced by faster Huskies and snowmobiles, but their wolf-like appearance is a beautiful sight to behold.

8. Kugsha

Also commonly known as an American Husky, the Kugsha is a Spitz-type dog with a wolf-like coat and build and was developed as working dogs due to their power and stamina. The breed is fairly new and somewhat rare, and little is known about their origins except that they were developed in Pennsylvania in the last few decades. They form powerful bonds with their owners, but they have a strong independent instinct that can make training a challenge.

9. Northern Inuit Dog

The Northern Inuit Dog is also commonly known as a “wolfdog,” although they are 100% domestic. If you’re looking for a dog that looks like a wolf, this breed is about as close as it gets. The breed’s main claim to fame was a starring role as the wolves in the TV series “Game of Thrones.” While they may look wild, they are in reality, loving and sweet dogs that make great family pets and bond strongly with their owners. These dogs need a great deal of exercise and companionship and are known to easily suffer from separation anxiety.

10. Saarloos Wolfdog

The Saarloos Wolfdog not only closely resembles a wolf but also has wolf blood, as they’re the result of a cross between a German Shepherd and a Siberian grey wolf. Their offspring were then bred again with German Shepherds, resulting in dogs that are one-quarter grey wolf. They are, as you’d imagine, powerful and athletic animals that require a ton of dedication and training, and early socialization is essential. These animals are not for novice dog owners and require far more special care than a domestic dog.

11. Samoyed

Known for their unique smile and thick coat, the Samoyed was originally bred for hunting and pulling heavy loads. Their characteristic smile is a great reflection of the Samoyed’s character, as these happy-go-lucky animals are brimming with happiness. They are affectionate animals and tend to bond closely with one family member but are still friendly and social with almost everyone else. They are muscular, powerful animals that would more closely resemble their wolf ancestors if not for their giveaway smile!

12. Siberian Husky

When it comes to powerful sled dogs, the Siberian Husky is the most famous and popular of all. Their thick double coats, pointed ears, and distinctive markings are clear indicators of their wolf ancestry, although they are purely domesticated dogs. These animals were made to work, and they have almost unmatched energy, stamina, and strength, making them a real challenge for novice owners. The breed has become increasingly popular in recent decades due to their unique beauty, but many end up in shelters because they are such a challenging breed to care for. If you have the time, patience, and resources, however, they are certainly wonderful dogs to have around.

13. Swedish Vallhund

The Swedish Vallhund is a small yet active and highly energetic dog, with a personality that barely fits into their small stature. Despite their size, they still have a wolf-like appearance with their thick grey coats and pointed ears and can be highly protective of their owners should the need arise. They are loyal little dogs, with a ton of affection and enthusiasm to bring into your home. These dogs are for active owners only because they need a great deal of exercise and can easily develop behavioral issues without it.

The Wolf-Dog Connection

I’m guessing that you clicked on this article because you want a dog that looks like a wolf, and you aren’t interested in a biology lesson about canine evolution and taxonomy. But, it’s important to note that dogs and wolves are closely related species, who share common ancestors.For a long time, domestic dogs (No matter the precise phylogeny of the group, dogs and wolves are very closely related critters, who exhibit a number of similarities. In many ways, dogs are akin to wolf puppies, given their juvenile facial features, a predilection for play and vocal ways.1) Dogs and wolves can interbreed and produce fertile wolf-dog hybrids.2) Some of these wolf-like traits can be “re-activated” through selective breeding efforts, which will make them resemble their wolf-like ancestors. This doesn’t make them wolves; it just makes themBefore we get started looking at wolf-like breeds, check out this photo of an actual wolf to help calibrate your eye.

Eight of the Most Wolf-Like Breeds

The eight breeds below all resemble wolves to varying degrees. Some are the product of dog-wolf hybridization, but others are simply dogs who’ve been selectively bred to resemble wolves.

1. Kugsha

Kughsas – also known as Amerindian malamutes – are a hybrid breed with an enigmatic history.Accounts of their precise origin vary from source to source, and none appear especially authoritative. However, they look like big huskies and exhibit the drive, love for running, and stamina that huskies do, but, like many other wolf hybrids, they have quite an independent streak and assertive personalities.Some report (although without much in the way of citations or documentation) that the breed name came about as a way to get around laws banning wolf hybrids.

2. Siberian Husky

The Siberian husky is a familiar and lovely breed, who is well-suited for homes that are prepared to accommodate a heavily shedding, high-energy dog who loves to play, roam, and explore.Accordingly, they are great for active families, runners, and bikers (that’s Lance-Armstrong-style bikers, not Jax-Teller-style bikers).

3. Alaskan Malamute

Although not as popular as the husky, the Alaskan malamute is another familiar breed, which you may encounter from time to time. Handsome, fluffy and bigger than the husky, the malamute was also developed as a sled-pulling breed (and for hunting polar bears, of all things).Malamutes are pretty, lovable, and very trainable when compared with some of the other dogs on this list. Like huskies, they have high energy levels, playful personalities and the ability to coat your entire home in a layer of their fur.

4. German Shepherds

German shepherds possess a distinct wolf-like aesthetic, but some clearly resemble wolves more than others do.For example, German shepherds with long hair tend to look more like wolves, and the larger, bulkier individuals also project a more wolf-like image than the small, lean ones do.German shepherds are sometimes clad in very wolf-like colors, including lots of gray, white and black, which helps further strengthen the resemblance. Both German shepherds and (less commonly) wild wolves occasionally exhibit jet-black coats, which is also pretty neat.Like many of the other breeds on this list, German shepherds are shedding machines, but they’re also loving, loyal, bright, and protective, so it is easy to understand their popularity.

5. Saarloos Wolfdog

The Saarloos wolfdog line was initially developed by Dutch breeder Leendert Saarloos in the 1930s. Although they were originally created by crossing European wolves with German shepherds, they have been recognized by the Federation Cynologique Internationale (the world’s leading international dog registry) as a distinct breed since 1981.One of the breeds that is most distantly related to other domestic dogs, and likely the most wolf-like breed in the world, Saarloos wolfdogs not only have a wolf-like build, their facial expressions are said to closely mimic those of wolves.These dogs are said to be loving and smart, but, like most other wolf-hybrids, not particularly interested in pleasing their non-fur parent.

6. Utonagan / Northern Inuit Dog

The Utonagan and Northern Inuit Dog are names applied to one or more breeds of domestic dogs who’ve been bred to look like wolves. There isn’t a ton of fantastic information available about them, and several sources contradict each other. Adding to the confusion, the term “Utonagan” means “Northern Inuit.”However, this big white dog breed appears to have been created by mixing husky, malamute, and German shepherd lines. They were apparently created in the early 1980s, so they aren’t terribly common. However, those who are familiar with the breed describe them as fairly husky-like in terms of personality and temperament.Fun Fact: The direwolves from HBO’s series

7. Tamaskan

Tamaskans are another breed that was reportedly produced by crossing – wait for it – malamutes and huskies, as well as a few other sled dogs. They may also have wolves in their recent family trees. Tamaskans aren’t recognized by any of the major breed registries, but there are a number of breed clubs around the world dedicated to these wolf-like dogs.Tamaskans are pretty similar to huskies in terms of temperament and abilities, and they reportedly make good pets for families that can handle high-energy pooches. Tamaskans – like some wild wolves – occur in both grey and black color forms.

8. Czechoslovakian Wolfdog

Another wolf-hybrid that is recognized by the Federation Cynologique Internationale, Czechoslovakian wolf dogs were initially developed for the Czech military. However, they’ve been used for search-and-rescue, tracking and herding work in subsequent years.Because this breed was deliberately created as part of a scientific study, their history is a little better documented than some other wolf-hybrids and mixed breeds.Czechoslovakian wolfdogs are said to be trainable, although they aren’t border collies, and they require a dedicated owner, who is willing to spend plenty of time working with their pooch.

Wolf-Dog History

It’s thought by many that domesticated dogs (canis lupus familiaris) are descendants of the gray wolf (canis lupus). And, over time, the gray wolf was simply domesticated by us humans. This was the general belief for a long time, but just like most things in life, it’sRecent research shows that rather than domesticated dogs being the great-great-great-great grandpups of wolves, they are more like long-lost cousins. So lost that they descend from an ancestor of the wolf (not the wolf himself) which were domesticated between 15,000 and 40,000 years ago. And a lot has changed since then.It’s all a bit muddy, but what we do know is that domesticated dogs still share much of theWe also know that their DNA is similar because they can mate and produce fertile wolf hybrids. And by breeding certain domesticated dog breeds together, you can re-activate specific genes to make them appear more wolf-like. You’ll see in the below list of wolf-like dogs which breeds areThis is excellent news for those that are craving to be the

18 Wolf-Like Dog Breeds

Let’s get to the bit that you’re here for, the wolf-like dogs! Here is our top list of dog breeds that look most like wolves. Some you wouldA few of these guys are wolf hybrids, which is as a direct result of scientific experiments. But some rely on the re-activated wolfy lookalike gene that we mentioned above. Everything you need to know about them is explained in their section, including whether they are just wolf-like, or a wolf hybrid.

Siberian Husky

When thinking about wolf-like dogs, the Siberian Husky is the first wolf-like dog that everyone thinks of. The Siberian Husky is also theHe originates from the cold lands of Siberia, where his purpose was to pull heavy sleds across vast icy expanses. Carrying both people and goods, this guy has stamina and strength. He has lots of energy, and if you welcome one of these guys into your life, you need to be an active family who can keep up with him.Recently, breeders have mixed the Siberian Husky with a wolf to create what is known as the real Wolf Hybrid. Although this sounds intriguing, he is more like a wild animal than a domesticated dog. Because he has a high wolf content he is not suited to the majority of families. But still check him out because he is a

Alaskan Malamute

The Alaskan Malamute is the Husky’sHe is super cuddly and affectionate, so if you’ve ever fancied cuddling a wolf, this is probably your closest (and safest!) chance. He is like the Husky, but much calmer in the home, and much more like a gentle giant.The Malamute originates from Alaska, and he was used by the Alaskan tribes to pull heavy carts between tribes. This freight boy has a lot of power and energy too, and he needs a strong leader. You need to teach him how to walk nicely on the leash if you are thinking about getting him.

Czechoslovakian Wolfdog

The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog looks a lot like a wolf. Also known as the Czechoslovakian Vlack, he is a relatively new breed created in the 1950s by the Czech military. He was designed to be a blood-thirsty and vicious patrol dog in the Cold War. The result wasHe is a German Shepherd that’s mixed with a Carpathian wolf, and to be precise, he is around 6% wolf and 94% German Shepherd. This breed is not officially recognized by the American Kennel Club just yet, but he is proving to be a popular companion for very active families.He is also used in search and rescue, herding, agility, tracking, drafting, and working dog sports too. This pooch is not for a first-time dog owner, and he needs 2 to 3 hours of exercise a day to be happy and healthy. But as long as you put in the hard work, this wolf hybrid is one of the closest creatures you can get to a pet wolf.

Saarloos Wolfdog

The Saarloos Wolfdog is another wolf doppelganger, andThe Saarloos is a kind pooch, but he is not overly cuddly with his humans. He retains his wild instincts and prefers the company of hisThe Saarloos Wolfdog is friendly with his humans and likes to sit at your feet in the evening – making him perfect for those who do not like lap dogs. Again, he is not for the first time owner, and he requires several hours of intense exercise to keep his body and mind happy.

Northern Inuit Dog / Utonagan

Many believe that these two dogs are different breeds, but there are the same; their names simply represent different places. You might recognize these dogs if you are a fan of the hit series, TheThey are another new breed created in the 1980s, and it is thought that they are a mix of the Husky, Alaskan Malamute, and the German Shepherd. Owners compare their personality

Tamaskan

The Tamaskan is anotherJust like the Northern Inuit, he is very similar in his personality to the Husky. So, as long as you can handle his high energy, he would make an excellent fit for your family. He is more laidback, devoted, and trainable than the Husky, so much so that he is used as a working gun dog and therapy dog.

Kugsha

The Kugsha’sHe was initially called the American Husky, but this didn’t go down well with Husky lovers. So he is now called the Kugsha or the Amerindian Malamute.In terms of weight and size, he finds himself in

German Shepherd

The German Shepherd is a well-known doggy in the canine world, and he is the 3German Shepherds have the same wild looking face and frame, and he is used in many wolf crosses because of his trainability, human loyalty and re-activating wolf genes. Some people say that the longer-haired German Shepherds look quite a bit like a wolf you’d find in the wild.He is an intensely energetic and intelligent dog who needs to be placed with a family that can spend a lot of time with him. It’s also essential to invest in plenty of toys and brain games to keep this boy’s

Swedish Vallhund

Have you ever wondered what a Corgi and a wolf mix would look like? Wonder no more, reader, because the Swedish Vallhund is precisely what their puppy would look like. This cute little wolf-like pooch stands up to 14 inches tall, and he is the shortest on this list. If you are after a mini wolf, look no further than this guy.This Viking dog of ancient legend dates back some 1,200 years ago. He is a herding dog, just like the Corgi, and uses the same ankle-nipping technique. When he is not bossing bovine, he

Samoyed

The Samoyed is a heavenly canine cloud that loves to cuddle. He is another ancient sled dog who can pull one and a half times his weight, as well as anThe Samoyed is very similar looking to the wolf, but his coat is much fluffier. If you aren’t a fan of the remnants of a white coat on your outfit or furniture, this boy is not for you because he is a heavy shedder. Thankfully, the sides of his mouth turn upwards to prevent drooling, so except for his hair, he is a clean pup.

Canadian Eskimo Dog

The Canadian Eskimo Dog is one of the rarest dog breeds in the world. It’s thought that there are less than 300 left in the world today. IfHe can weigh up to 105 pounds if not used as a working dog. This breed can be bigger than the giant Alaskan Malamute. You can often tell him apart from a Malamute simply by the color of his eyes because they are any color apart from blue. With his yellow eyes, he looks very wolf-like.

Shikoku

The Shikoku is a Japanese dog breed, who is also known as the Kochi Ken or the Japanese Wolfdog. This is because his head looks similar to a wolf’s head, and he used to live in the mountains of Japan hunting wild boar and other game.He has similar face mask patterns to the Arctic sled dogs, and his coat is similar too. The main differences are his curly Akita-like tail and smaller pointy ears. He is now

Finnish Lapphund

The Finnish Lapphund is an obvious Nordic breed with his fluffy exterior and Spitz-like face. He is also wolf-like in his appearance, and his head and coat are very similar, albeit in aHe is swift and agile, making him a fantastic agility course participant. This is great if you plan to show off how smart and obedient your pooch is. Finnish Lapphunds are very loving with their family, but wary of strangers. He prefers the quiet, cuddly life with his family, and doesn’t like to be the center of attention.

Seppala Siberian Sleddog

The Seppala Siberian Sleddog was once labeled the Siberian Husky. But after several decades of further breeding, he is now aSeppalas are very similar in personality to the Husky, but have a hard-working ethic. He is just as energetic and has the same exercise needs, but he is much calmer in the home. This is a big appeal of his, and many families find him more relaxing to be around.

Caucasian Shepherd

The Caucasian Shepherd originates from Russia and is often referred to as the Russian Bear Dog. These furry beasts are a very furry wolf-like dog breed, and a large part of that is due to their long fluffy coat. They are hardy dogs, bred to stand up so some of the most punishing cold mountain weather conditions.These dogs are largely used as guardian dogs and are protectors of their flock. They are used on farms and thrive best in cooler climates. Caucasian Shepherds need plenty of room to roam, and males can be both

King Shepherd

King Shepherds are a rarer breed, and they have similar genetic lines to the German Shepherd. Their parents are the German Shepherd and the Shiloh Shepherd. The King Shepherd was created to make a much larger version of the German Shepherd, and has proven to be popular.Breed health was also a factor, as backyard breeding has become popular, producing genetic defects in purebred German Shepherds. Introducing the Shiloh Shepherd to

Shiloh Shepherd

Similar to the King Shepherd, the Shiloh Shepherd was originally bred to create a larger line of the German Shepherd. They accomplished this by mixing in the lines of an Alaskan Malamute. Later on, they actually introduced the Canadian White Shepherd and the Czechoslovakian Wolfdog (another dog on this list) to breed additional genetic diversity for health reasons.The Shiloh Shepherd looks in many ways like a regular German Shepherd, just bigger. They can have longer or shorter coats, and are not officially recognized by the AKC. It’s worth noting that longer and fluffier coats are typically the norm. They should have plenty of room to roam, if you plan to bring one home. They are more docile and have lower energy levels than standard German Shepherds,

American Alsatian

The American Alsatian is also a derived dog breed from the German Shepherd. This is what many would consider the “American version” of the German Shepherd dog. These dogs areThe American Alsatian breed was achieved by initially crossing the German Shepherd and Alaskan Malamute. From there other breeds were introduced, including the Great Pyrenees, and the Anatolian Shepherd to name a few. This gave the Alsatian some added size. Alsatians can have shorter coats, but can also have longer coats as well, depending on their genetics. Their eyes tend to be amber in color,

A Wolfy Word of Warning

Firstly, with the increasingly popular desire of welcoming a wolf-like dog into our homes, brings the rise of dodgy breeders. Dodgy breeders will claim to have domesticated wolves, rare wolf hybrids, or high content wolf dogs for sale. When in reality, they are probablySecondly, the famous Game of Thrones series has been blamed for popularizing the idea of a pet dire wolf, and people rushed out to get their hands on a wolf hybrid. The puppy stages seem ok, and then when they hit their adolescent stage, things changed. Families quickly realized they were nothing like domesticated dogs. Most families cannot cope with a wild animal, and they then surrender them to wolf hybrid sanctuaries.If you are still convinced that you want a wolf hybrid rather than a wolf-like dog, please

Wolf Hybrid Laws

Wolf hybrid laws vary from state to state and different countries around the world. Most of the dog breeds above are wolf-like dogs, not wolf hybrids. TheYou will need to discuss with your breeder whether your dog is an official wolf hybrid. They will advise you accordingly. Also, be sure to research your local hybrid laws yourself as to whether the selling, importation, or ownership of wolf hybrids is allowed in your place of residence.

Wolf-Like Dogs You Can Actually Live With

Dogs (CBecause of their close genetic similarity, dogs and wolves share many physical traits. Wolves, however, are stronger with higher levels of energy and stamina. Wolf instincts and temperament differ quite dramatically as well. Wolves are stubborn, erratic, difficult to train, and a danger to children and other small animals. These qualities make them a poor choice to keep as a guard dog or household pet.That said, wolves are beautiful, powerful creatures. It’s not surprising that many people fantasise about having one as a pet. If you long to run with the wolves, I’d suggest getting a dog that looks like a wolf instead. You can use this article to help decide which one would be the best fit for you.

2. Siberian Husky

Siberian Huskies are known for their distinctive thickly furred double coat, erect triangle-shaped ears, and distinctive color markings. They are medium-sized dogs, weighing up to 27-28 kg. They have facial markings that are very similar to wolves. Their color comes in a variety of shades like black and white, red and white, brown, gray and white, silver, wolf-gray, sable and white, red-orange with black tips, and dark gray.

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Huskies are a very loyal, intelligent, and sturdy working breed. They were originally bred by the Chukchi Tribe in Siberia to haul heavy loads.They are a very energetic and active dog that shares many of the same behavioral and temperamental characteristics of their wolf ancestors. For instance, they typically howl rather than bark, are known for being escape artists, and feel a powerful need to belong to a “pack.” As such, they often crave the companionship of other dogs and people.Though the ASPCA lists them as good with children and as good family dogs, Huskies do have special exercise needs. They have a lot of energy and can turn destructive if they don’t get enough exercise. Because of their tendency to escape, the ASPCA also recommends having a fence in your backyard.

3. Czechoslovakian Wolfdog

The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog is a relatively new breed, a hybrid between German Shepherds and Carpathian wolves. The goal was to create a breed with the strength and stamina of a wolf with the temperament and intelligence of the German Shepherd.The breed’s build and hair very closely resemble that of wolves. It’s distinguished by its amber eyes, and erect triangle-shaped ears. Its thick fur ranges in color from yellow- to silver-grey.Czechoslovakian Wolfdogs are very social and develop strong bonds with their families. While good with other pets, you will need to watch them when encountering strange animals. As such, it’s really important to socialize the dog.

4. Kugsha

Kugsha, or Amerindian Malamutes, are native to the United States and are wolf hybrids.They are very strong, larger and longer than Siberian Huskies but not like Alaskan Malamute. They are born travellers. Their long legs and strong body make them well-suited to carrying heavy loads across long distances.Because they’re only recently domesticated, they are very independent with lots of spirit. While Kugshas are very loyal and develop strong relationships with their owners, they are not a good dog for families with small children due to their predatory nature. Also, they need a lot of exercise and can get destructive if they do not get enough physical activity.

5. Samoyed

Samoyeds are Russian breed of dog they get their name from the Samoyedic peoples of Siberia. They are strong, well-built and broad-headed. They are very lively and good companions. One of their distinguishing characteristics is the “Sammy smile,” which very noticeable because of the contrast between its white coat and black lips.Samoyeds are calm, devoted, very friendly and pleasant dogs and love everyone. Their colours are, white and shades of white with long and thick fur. They were bred to hunt. They love hiking, tracking and keeping their owners warm by sleeping on top of them at night.They are great family dogs and are very good with children and are very playful.Unfortunately, Samoyeds have a number of congenital health problems including hip dysplasia, diabetes, and kidney disease.

6. Tamaskan

Tamaskans are a very new breed, recognized by the American Kennel Club only in 2013. They were bred to look like wolves, with a thick coat that comes in red-grey, wolf-grey, and black-grey. Because they’re so new, they’re quite rare. There are only 600 certified Tamaskans in the world. However, they are growing in popularity.Tamaskans are good family dogs and particularly good with children. They’re very smart, easily trainable and highly social, so they shouldn’t be left alone for long periods of time. They also require quite a bit of exercise and can turn destructive if they don’t get enough physical stimulation.

7. Canadian Eskimo Dog

Also known as Qimmiq, Canadian Husky, and Canadian Inuit Dogs, this breed is a working dog that used to pull sleds and hunt. They are large dogs, weighing up to 66 and 95 pounds (30 to 43 kilograms). The breed is currently endangered, with only 300 registered purebreds in 2008.These dogs are smart, energetic, strong, tough, and very loyal. However, they are not great fits for families with other small dogs, because they have fairly high prey drives. They also do best in cold weather and are prone to heat stroke.They also require an enormous amount of exercise, often much more than the typical owner can give. So think carefully before getting one.

8. Northern Inuit Dog

The Northern Inuit dog is an unrecognized crossbred dog, developed in the U.K. with the intent of creating a domesticated working dog that looks like a wolf. This dog originates from crosses between German Shepherds, Siberian Huskies, and Inuit dogs. This dog has a medium build and its shape and coloring very much resembles that of a wolf.The Northern Inuit Dog is not for an inexperienced owner. They’re very smart, but also stubborn and difficult to train. They also tend toward having separation anxiety, but training at a young age can take care of that. They are also better fits for families with more than one dog.

9. Utonagan

Utonagans were bred in England with the aim of producing a wolf-like dog. They are a mix of three dogs-the Alaskan Malamute, German Shepherd, and Siberian Husky.While not bred for any particular task, Utonagans are easily trainable and can be taught to do any number of tasks. They are very friendly and intelligent dogs and tend to get along well with people, including children. They are also fairly energetic and require significant exercise—at least a daily walk or job. That said, be careful about exercising them in the heat: this breed does best in colder weather.They are not recommended for apartment dwellers and do best in houses with a high-fenced yard.

10. German Shepherd

The German Shepherd Dogs are one of world’s most recognized and popular breeds. They are also known as Alsatians in Great Britain and parts of Europe. They are the second most popular breed in the United States and the fourth most popular in the U.K.They are bred especially for their intelligence and are ranked as the third most intelligent breed. Their intelligence makes German Shepherds excellent working dogs and they are often employed as police, guard, and search-and-rescue dogs.They are very energetic, eager to learn, and very much need a job or task to perform. Otherwise they get bored and can become destructive. If not adequately socialized, they can become over-protective of their family. They are a bit aloof socially, but very loyal to their owners.

11. Saarloos Wolfdog

Dutch breeder Leendert Saarloos started cross-breeding a German Shepherd Dog male to a female European Wolf, to get better working dogs. The Saarloos Wolfhound is strong and energetic and has a powerful neck, broad head, and long legs. The Dutch Kennel Club recognized the breed in 1975.It has wolf-like expressions, as well as a wolf-like head. This dog is not recommended for apartment life. It has lot of stamina and needs a lot of daily exercise. It’s a strong-willed dog and needs a very experienced owner capable of providing it the necessary exercise and discipline.

What Do Wolf-Like Dogs Eat?

Captive wolves and wolf-dogs usually do best eating diets like those of wolves in the wild. Wild wolves survive on meals of deer, elk, moose, bison, and other natural prey. In fact, even captive wolves and wolf-dogs are capable of, and benefit from, eating pounds and pounds of raw meat.More generally, the more wolf that is in the mix, the more feral the dog will behave. This aggressive behavior also depends on the number of generations that your wolf dog is away from its first breeding. These wolf dogs don’t thrive on the typical dog food. Ideally, you should feed these wolf dogs several pounds of raw meat per day, though it’s fine to feed them chicken and turkey. In fact, bones are not an issue for these wolf dogs, because they will actually enjoy and benefit from eating these raw, whole bones. In addition to these raw meats and raw bones, your wolf dog will need access to fresh grass and other vegetation. Many wolf dogs enjoy fruit. That said, you should check with your vet to see that the fruit you offer is safe for your pet.

Typical Health Problems of Wolf-Like Dogs

These breeds need lots of regular exercise. Without regular exercise, these dogs can become destructive and depressed. They also undergo what some might call “normal wear and tear”; they’ll experience joint pain as they get older, especially if they are eating an unhealthy diet.

The Evolutionary History of Dogs and Wolves

All modern dogs are descendants of wolves. This domestication may actually have happened twice, producing groups of dogs descended from two unique common ancestors. Wolves began to adapt to human society long before humans settled down and began practicing agriculture. Since the first dogs settled with humans, their relationship has been an evolving phenomenon, resulting in many new breeds and new behaviors. Since dogs are a part of our everyday lives, it’s good to know where they come from.

What animal did dogs evolve from?

It’s amazing that there is a genetic connection between a wolf that roamed the tundra 35,000 years ago to modern dogs, but it’s true. While scientists once thought that dogs descended from gray wolves, now, through genetic studies, researchers discovered that dogs and wolves share a common ancestor instead of a direct lineage.The common ancestor between dogs and wolves was a prehistoric wolf that lived in Europe or Asia sometime between 9,000 to 34,000 years ago. Several subgroups of prehistoric wolves went extinct about 10,000 years ago. This was the same time as the mammoths, giant sloths, and saber-toothed tigers. Still, no one knows exactly what kind of wolf gave rise to all of the amazing dog breeds living today.

How have wolves changed over time?

Wolves have evolved into numerous species that span the globe. Some species are faster than others. Some species are larger than others. Some are more pack-minded. Some are more powerful. And, some are more clever. Over the last 30,000 years, wolf DNA, through natural selection, has been tweaked little by little to make them successful in nearly every environment.

What do wolves eat?

Wolves are carnivores, which means they primarily eat meat. Their favorite prey is large hoofed mammals, such as deer, elk, moose, caribou and bison. Since many of these animals are larger than wolves, the only way wolves can catch them is to live and hunt in groups. That said, wolves (especially when desperate) will hunt smaller prey as well. For example, grey wolves hunt mostly large, hoofed animals including different kinds of deer, mountain goats, moose, elk, and bison, but they will also hunt hares, beavers, birds, and fish.

How do different cultures view wolves?

Cultures around the world have many different views when it comes to the meaning of wolves. In fact, Native American cultures have long seen the wolf as both a powerful animal and a source of inspiration. The Ojibwe believed that a wolfman spirit made the Great Plains for them and for the other animals, too. Also, the Hopi honor a wolf katsina, a spiritual being who serves as a guardian for sacred dancers. These are but a handful of the many views about wolves held by cultures around the world.

Where Do Wolves Live?

When we talk about wolves, we often refer to the iconic gray wolf. In the lower 48 states, gray wolves were hunted to near extinction, though some populations survived and others have since been reintroduced. Few gray wolves survive in Europe, though many live in Alaska, Canada, and Asia. Wolves live and hunt in packs of around six to ten animals.The gray wolf lives today in a diverse range of environments, including tundra, mountain areas, woodlands, forests, grasslands, and deserts. There are many species of wolves that span nearly the whole planet. Canis have adapted to numerous environments and are, inarguably, one of the most successful mammal genus on the planet.

Are wolf attacks common?

Although wolf attacks do occur, their frequency varies with geographical location and historical period. Gray wolf attacks are rare because wolves are often subsequently killed, or even extirpated in reaction by human beings. There are only a few wolf attacks on humans in the U.S. and Europe. Frankly, wolves are more interested in eating your pets or your livestock than they are in eating you.