Dogs of the World?

Contents

Dogs Of The World is a series of dog and cat breed designs that I started working on in Spring 2014 that became a big hit on the internet. There are now a total of at least 366 dog designs, 50 cat designs, 24 bunny designs, and birds too, which are available as grouped and individual prints in my etsy store.

Who is no 1 dog in world?

(CBS News) — The Labrador Retriever is still the most popular dog breed, according to the American Kennel Club. The AKC released its Most Popular Dog Breeds list on May 1, 2020. It’s based on 2019 AKC registration statistics.

Which dog is rare in the world?

1. Norwegian Lundehund. Dating back to the Ice Age, the Norwegian Lundehund is recognised as one of the rarest dogs on the planet due to its unique characteristics which aren’t shared by any other breed.

How many types of dogs are there in the whole world?

Worldwide, the FCI lists 360 officially recognized breeds. These don’t include experimental breeds that have yet to achieve official status.

Which dog is the greatest dog in the world?

English Mastiff. The English Mastiff is officially the largest dog in the world. According to the Guiness Book of Records – a dog called Zorba weighed in at 142.7 kg and stood 27 inches high in 1981.

The American Kennel Club currently recognizes 193 dog breeds, and there are countless more that havent been officially recognized. From popular breeds to little-known canines, these 50 dogs can tell us a lot about both the countries and periods in history they came from.

Helen Keller brought the first Akita to U.S. soil a gift she received on a trip to Japan. One of the oldest sled dog breeds from the Arctic region, the Alaskan Malamute likely descended from domesticated wolf-dogs who crossed the Bering Strait alongside Paleolithic hunters.

Theyre named after the Mahlemut Inuit tribe, who bred the dogs to haul sleds over long distances and sniff out seal breathing holes in the ice. The dogs typically doubled as camp guardians and sighthounds for hunting hare, antelope or wild boar. Friars at the Benedictine abbey of St. Hubert played a part in developing the low-built dogs, who were able to traverse rough terrain as they tracked rabbit and deer.

These dogs, known for their shaggy hairdos, are closely associated with Bergamo in the Italian Alps, where they were used to guard sheep on the rocky terrain. Bernese Mountain Dogs originally come from the canton of Bern in west-central Switzerland, where they were bred to drive cattle and guard the farms spread across the regions hilly terrain. They can pull many times their weight, which led to their rising popularity as farm dogs in the U.S. as well, after the first pair was brought into the country by a Kansas farmer in 1926.

While commonly associated with France, the breed originated in the Canary Islands of Spain, where they were used as sailing dogs. The blue heeler, officially known as the Australian Cattle Dog, comes from the land down under, originally a cross between imported British Smithfields, Scottish Highland Collies, Dalmatians, and wild dingoes. The breeds lineage can be traced back to old Roman dogs and Viking spitzes, both brought to the British Isles by conquerors.

This muscular dog from southern Italy descended from the Roman molosser and was frequently tasked as a night watchdog on farms throughout Basilicata, Campania and Apulia. The Catalburun, or Turkish Pointer, is easily recognized by the deep crease running between its nostrils, making its nose look forked. These loyal guardians were likely introduced into the bloodlines of many other breeds, including Balkan sheepdogs and Asian mastiffs.

The breed was later crossed with pugs and the Japanese Chin, resulting in the King Charles Spaniel we know today. The Chihuahua is among the oldest breeds in the Americas, dating back to pre-Columbian times you can spot similar dogs on artifacts from lost civilizations. Throughout their history, theyve served as companion dogs to Chinese nobility (one Tang Dynasty emperor was said to have 5,000 Chows), haulers and hunters.

Dalmatians are classified as coach dogs, whose traditional job was to protect horse-drawn carriages of the Romani people. The Fila Brasileiro, or Brazilian Mastiff, was developed in Brazil as a tracking dog that traps its prey and waits for the hunter to arrive. The large dogs are known for their loose skin and impetuous temperaments, making them unsuitable as pets for most people.

The “Apollo of Dogs,” who are taller than most adults when standing on their hind legs, trace their origins to Germany, where German nobles once used them on wild boar hunts. The lively, cheerful Kooikerhondje can be seen in paintings by Dutch artists in the late Middle Ages, when the breed was used for duck hunting. The curly-coated Lagotto Romagnolo comes from the Romagna region of Italy, where the breed was traditionally used as water retrievers and truffle hunters.

You might recognize the Malinois, named after the Flemish city of Mechelen (Malines in French), as the dogs tasked with guarding the White House grounds alongside their Secret Service companions (theyre also frequent choices for police and military K-9s). The little Maltese dog was brought to Malta by the Phoenicians, where the breed was developed and spread throughout the Roman Empire as the ultimate symbol of status and good taste. These massive, lovable, sweet-tempered working dogs come from the Canadian province of Newfoundland, where they were companions for fishermen, specializing in water rescues (they have partially webbed feet) and carting fish to market.

Another Newf named Brumus served as a “nanny dog” for Senator Robert F. Kennedys 11 children. The dogs were originally bred on the remote island of Vaeroy, where puffin meat was one of the only sources of protein during the Arctic winters. These agile dogs could scale steep cliff walls and squeeze into crevices to catch the birds.

The ancestors of the modern Pembroke Welsh Corgi were dogs bred to herd cattle and sheep by Flemish immigrants to the United Kingdom. They maintain a close association with England, thanks in part to the fact that theyre a favorite of Queen Elizabeth II, whos always owned at least one since 1933. One of the most famous Pomeranian owners was Queen Victoria, who had a small dog named Windsors Marco.

The compact and cute pug dates back some 2,000 years to ancient China, where emperors took a liking to small flat-faced dogs. The affectionate Rhodesian Ridgeback (previously called the African Lion Hound) hails from southern Africa, where it was bred from Greyhounds and terriers brought by Dutch colonists and native Khoi dogs. The hounds were used as hunting dogs, skilled at tracking and distracting large game animals, like lions, leopards and baboons.

They were bred by a group of hospice monks founded by Bernard of Menthon to help rescue travelers en route to Rome whod gotten buried in snow drifts and avalanches. One of the oldest dog breeds in the world comes from the Fertile Crescent in the Middle East, with a history dating back as far as 7,000 BC. The thick, white coat of the Samoyed makes them impervious to cold, including the minus-60 degree temperatures of their homeland in the Siberian town of Oymyakon.

The upturned mouth corners that give these dogs their signature smile also prevent drooling, so no icicles will form on their faces. The wrinkly, blue-tongued Shar Pei originated in southern China during the Han Dynasty; the name translates to “sandy skin” for the breeds rough coat. The Shih Tzu quickly became the favored dog of Chinese royalty, and the country didnt allow their export until the 1930s.

The breed garnered attention in the early 1900s, after they were brought to Alaska for sled dog races, which they began to win with increasing frequency. The Stabyhoun, one of the rarest dog breeds in the world, comes from the Dutch province of Friesland, where its depicted and mentioned in 17th and 18th century art and literature. Poor transportation systems in the region meant the dogs had little opportunity to crossbreed, and the breed remains quite rare outside of their country of origin.

The West Highland White Terrier, or Westie for short, has been winning the hearts of dog owners for more than three centuries. These smart and entertaining dogs were originally bred in Scotland and the British Isles to hunt rodents that carried disease and infested grain stores. Columbus and other European explorers mentioned strange, hairless dogs in their journals of visits to Mexico.

Did you know there are over 400 dog breeds in the world? (Not counting all the mixes, of course!) Illustrator Lili Chin drew 345 of the different breeds and painted them onto a world map according to their country of origin. Its so fun to search for different breeds on it! Look for your favourites on the zoom-in version on Lilis website!

Buy posters or a jigsaw puzzle illustrating (almost) all the different Dog Breeds of the World by artist Lili Chin!

It’s a dog’s world

The American Kennel Club currently recognizes 193 dog breeds, and there are countless more that haven’t been officially recognized. From popular breeds to little-known canines, these 50 dogs can tell us a lot about both the countries and periods in history they came from.Photo courtesy of iStock / DarioEgidi

Afghan Hound – Afghanistan

The regal Afghan Hound is thought to be one of the oldest purebred dog breeds in the world; some even contend that an Afghan Hound pair represented dogs on Noah’s ark. Lore aside, the breed can be traced back to the areas known today as Afghanistan, India and Pakistan, where they were once hunting companions for royalty.Photo courtesy of iStock / TaynaPanova

Akita – Japan

The burly, double-coated Akita has a lineage dating back to ancient Japan, with the first modern Akitas bred in the Akita prefecture during the 17th century as a hunting dog. Helen Keller brought the first Akita to U.S. soil – a gift she received on a trip to Japan.Photo courtesy of iStock / Nicola Colombo

Alaskan Malamute – Alaska

One of the oldest sled dog breeds from the Arctic region, the Alaskan Malamute likely descended from domesticated wolf-dogs who crossed the Bering Strait alongside Paleolithic hunters. They’re named after the Mahlemut Inuit tribe, who bred the dogs to haul sleds over long distances and sniff out seal breathing holes in the ice.Photo courtesy of iStock / animalinfo

Azawakh – West Africa

The elegant Azawakh comes from the arid south Sahara and Azawakh Valley, where they were traditionally kept by Tuareg nomads (and treated as members of the family). The dogs typically doubled as camp guardians and sighthounds for hunting hare, antelope or wild boar.Photo courtesy of iStock / dageldog

Basset Hound – France

The charming and instantly recognizable Basset Hound was originally bred in France and Belgium as a scent hound. Friars at the Benedictine abbey of St. Hubert played a part in developing the low-built dogs, who were able to traverse rough terrain as they tracked rabbit and deer.Photo courtesy of iStock / Magdanphoto

Bergamasco Shepherd – Italy

These dogs, known for their shaggy hairdos, are closely associated with Bergamo in the Italian Alps, where they were used to guard sheep on the rocky terrain.Photo courtesy of iStock / Aleksandr Zotov

Bernese Mountain Dog – Switzerland

Bernese Mountain Dogs originally come from the canton of Bern in west-central Switzerland, where they were bred to drive cattle and guard the farms spread across the region’s hilly terrain.They can pull many times their weight, which led to their rising popularity as farm dogs in the U.S. as well, after the first pair was brought into the country by a Kansas farmer in 1926.Photo courtesy of iStock / Eudyptula

Bichon Frise – Canary Islands, Spain

Bichon Frise is French for “curly lap dog,” an apt description for this toy dog. While commonly associated with France, the breed originated in the Canary Islands of Spain, where they were used as sailing dogs. By the 13th century, they’d become a favored lapdog in the royal courts of Western Europe.Photo courtesy of iStock / Carmelka

Blue Heeler – Australia

The blue heeler, officially known as the Australian Cattle Dog, comes from the land down under, originally a cross between imported British Smithfields, Scottish Highland Collies, Dalmatians, and wild dingoes. They get their name for their coat that often turns a blue-gray shade.Photo courtesy of iStock / Lhanna Frost

Border Collie – Scotland

Border Collies, developed in the Scottish borders as a herding dog, continue their traditional work throughout the world. The breed’s lineage can be traced back to old Roman dogs and Viking spitzes, both brought to the British Isles by conquerors.Photo courtesy of iStock / Wojciech Kozielczyk

Boston Terrier – Boston, Massachusetts

The Boston Terrier, nicknamed the “American Gentleman,” originated in the 1870s as a cross between a bulldog and a white English Terrier. The resulting dog – the ancestor of all modern Boston Terriers – was named Judge, and was sold to a Boston man named William O’Brien. They’re the official dog of Massachusetts and the mascot of Boston University.Photo courtesy of iStock / Kemter

Cane Corso – Southern Italy

This muscular dog from southern Italy descended from the Roman molosser and was frequently tasked as a night watchdog on farms throughout Basilicata, Campania and Apulia.Photo courtesy of iStock / Eudyptula

Catahoula Leopard Dog – Louisiana

The Catahoula Leopard Dog, the state dog of Louisiana, is likely a cross between dogs brought over by Spanish and French explorers and the dogs kept by Native Americans in Northern Louisiana.Photo courtesy of iStock / HAYKIRDI

Catalburun – Turkey

The Catalburun, or Turkish Pointer, is easily recognized by the deep crease running between its nostrils, making its nose look forked. The breed’s history is largely a matter of speculation, but it’s mostly found in the Mersin province.Photo courtesy of iStock / Kateryna Ovcharenko

Caucasian Shepherd Dog – Russia

The Caucasian Shepherd Dog comes from the Caucasus Mountains of Eastern Europe, where it has existed for centuries. These loyal guardians were likely introduced into the bloodlines of many other breeds, including Balkan sheepdogs and Asian mastiffs.Photo courtesy of iStock / Bigandt_Photography

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel – United Kingdom

The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel ranks among the most popular breeds in the United States, but its origins lie in England, where they were fancied by King Charles I and his son Charles II. The breed was later crossed with pugs and the Japanese Chin, resulting in the King Charles Spaniel we know today.Photo courtesy of iStock / Ruslanshug

Chihuahua – Mexico

The tiny Chihuahua has become a symbol of Mexico in a big way. The Chihuahua is among the oldest breeds in the Americas, dating back to pre-Columbian times – you can spot similar dogs on artifacts from lost civilizations.Photo courtesy of iStock / VKarlov

Chow Chow – Northern China

In China, where this breed originates, the Chow Chow is known as the Songshi-Quan, or “puffy lion dog.” Evidence of the breed dates back to the Han Dynasty, but Chows likely go back much further. Throughout their history, they’ve served as companion dogs to Chinese nobility (one Tang Dynasty emperor was said to have 5,000 Chows), haulers and hunters.Photo courtesy of iStock / Emre Ceylan

Czechoslovakian Wolfdog – Czechoslovakia

This wolf-like dog was bred from German Shepherds and Carpathian wolves for patrolling the border of Czechoslovakia during the 1950s. They’re still used as search and rescue dogs to this day.Photo courtesy of iStock / olgagorovenko

Dachshund – Germany

“Dachshund” means “badger dog” in German, and the breed was originally developed to dig into badger dens some 600 years ago. Anti-German sentiment during World War I led the breed in the U.S. to be called “liberty hounds” for a time.Photo courtesy of iStock / Image Source

Dalmatian – Croatia

While the original origins of this beloved spotted dog are contested, they certainly became popular along the Adriatic Sea in the area known as Dalmatia. Dalmatians are classified as coach dogs, whose traditional job was to protect horse-drawn carriages of the Romani people.Photo courtesy of iStock / apomares

English Bulldog – England

The ancestors of the modern bulldog were used in the grisly sport of bull-baiting, which was banned in England in 1835. Breeders began developing the dog from a big-jawed brawler to the friendly companion dog we know today.While the bulldog has long been a symbol of England, it’s also a popular mascot in the U.S. Handsome Dan at Yale is believed to be the first animal mascot in sports.Photo courtesy of iStock / studiof22byricardorocha

Estrela Mountain Dog – Portugal

The ancestors of the Estrela Mountain Dog were herd guards in the Serra da Estrela of what is now Portugal. The breed (one of the oldest in the country) was developed over centuries, as shepherds selected dogs for breeding that were large, strong, agile and loyal.Photo courtesy of iStock / olgagorovenko

Fila Brasileiro – Brazil

The Fila Brasileiro, or Brazilian Mastiff, was developed in Brazil as a tracking dog that traps its prey and waits for the hunter to arrive. The large dogs are known for their loose skin and impetuous temperaments, making them unsuitable as pets for most people.Photo courtesy of iStock / PavelRodimov

Finnish Spitz – Finland

The national dog of Finland has been around in its home country, mostly as a hunting dog, for more than 3,000 years. The dog’s distinctive quick bark (up to 160 barks a minute) and acute sense of smell make them particularly good for hunting game birds.Photo courtesy of iStock / RalfWeigel

Great Dane – Germany

The “Apollo of Dogs,” who are taller than most adults when standing on their hind legs, trace their origins to Germany, where German nobles once used them on wild boar hunts. While Denmark had nothing to do with the development of the breed, they were often called Danish Mastiffs, and the Dane name stuck.Photo courtesy of iStock / Bigandt_Photography

Kooikerhondje – Netherlands

The lively, cheerful Kooikerhondje can be seen in paintings by Dutch artists in the late Middle Ages, when the breed was used for duck hunting. Baronesse van Hardenbroek van Ammerstol helped preserve the breed after World War I as part of a silent resistance to the occupation of the Netherlands.Photo courtesy of iStock / Lena Gadanski

Lagotto Romagnolo – Italy

The curly-coated Lagotto Romagnolo comes from the Romagna region of Italy, where the breed was traditionally used as water retrievers and truffle hunters. Their acute nose makes them some of the world’s best truffle dogs.Photo courtesy of iStock / VKarlov

Lhasa Apso – Tibet

The story of the Lhasa Apso goes back over a thousand years to the palaces and monasteries of the Himalayas. Tibetan folklore tells of a mythical Snow Lion that protects the country, and these “bearded lion dogs” were considered the Snow Lion’s earthly manifestations.The breed spread around the world in part because the Fourteenth Dalai Lama often gifted them to visitors.Photo courtesy of iStock / r3dsnake

Malinois – Belgium

You might recognize the Malinois, named after the Flemish city of Mechelen (Malines in French), as the dogs tasked with guarding the White House grounds alongside their Secret Service companions (they’re also frequent choices for police and military K-9s).The breed originated in northwestern Belgium as a herding dog. A memorial to military dogs in Fayetteville, North Carolina depicts a Belgian Malinois.Photo courtesy of iStock / Laures

Maltese – Malta

The island of Malta off the coast of Sicily has long been a seaport and trading center in the Mediterranean. The little Maltese dog was brought to Malta by the Phoenicians, where the breed was developed and spread throughout the Roman Empire as the ultimate symbol of status and good taste.Photo courtesy of iStock / SvetaElfimova

Newfoundland – Canada

These massive, lovable, sweet-tempered working dogs come from the Canadian province of Newfoundland, where they were companions for fishermen, specializing in water rescues (they have partially webbed feet) and carting fish to market.A Newfoundland named Seaman was part of the Lewis and Clark expedition across North America. Another Newf named Brumus served as a “nanny dog” for Senator Robert F. Kennedy’s 11 children.Photo courtesy of iStock / LagunaticPhoto

New Guinea Singing Dog – New Guinea

Native to the highlands of New Guinea, the New Guinea Singing Dog is best known for its haunting and melodious howl (the dogs do not bark). The breed is closely related to wild dingoes and is difficult to tame, so very few exist as pets.Photo courtesy of iStock / Lya_Cattel

Norwegian Lundehund – Norway

The term Lundehund comes from the Norwegian words for “puffin” and “dog,” and the Norwegian Lundehund was indeed developed for hunting puffins and puffin eggs.The dogs were originally bred on the remote island of Vaeroy, where puffin meat was one of the only sources of protein during the Arctic winters. These agile dogs could scale steep cliff walls and squeeze into crevices to catch the birds.Photo courtesy of iStock / Ирина Мещерякова

Pembroke Welsh Corgi – Wales

The ancestors of the modern Pembroke Welsh Corgi were dogs bred to herd cattle and sheep by Flemish immigrants to the United Kingdom. They maintain a close association with England, thanks in part to the fact that they’re a favorite of Queen Elizabeth II, who’s always owned at least one since 1933.Photo courtesy of iStock / PopoudinaSvetlana

Pomeranian – Poland

Looking at the small-statured Pomeranian, it can be hard to believe that the breed descends from the powerful sled dogs of the Arctic. This miniaturized version gets its name from the Pomerania region of Poland and western Germany, where it was developed. One of the most famous Pomeranian owners was Queen Victoria, who had a small dog named Windsor’s Marco.Photo courtesy of iStock / GCShutter

Pug – China

The compact and cute pug dates back some 2,000 years to ancient China, where emperors took a liking to small flat-faced dogs. Dutch traders brought pugs to Europe in the 1500s, and they quickly became the mascot of the House of Orange after a pug barked to warn of an attack by Spanish troops, saving the life of the Prince of Orange at the time.Photo courtesy of iStock / AsyaPozniak

Rhodesian Ridgeback – South Africa

The affectionate Rhodesian Ridgeback (previously called the African Lion Hound) hails from southern Africa, where it was bred from Greyhounds and terriers brought by Dutch colonists and native Khoi dogs. The hounds were used as hunting dogs, skilled at tracking and distracting large game animals, like lions, leopards and baboons.Photo courtesy of iStock / swisshipps

St. Bernard – Italy & Switzerland

These gentle giants of the Swiss and Italian Alps rank among the world’s most recognizable breeds. They were bred by a group of hospice monks founded by Bernard of Menthon to help rescue travelers en route to Rome who’d gotten buried in snow drifts and avalanches.Contrary to popular belief, the dogs didn’t traditionally carry casks around their necks; that depiction was made popular by the 1820 Sir Edwin Landseer painting called “Alpine Mastiffs Reanimating a Distressed Traveler.Photo courtesy of iStock / SerKucher

Saluki – Fertile Crescent

One of the oldest dog breeds in the world comes from the Fertile Crescent in the Middle East, with a history dating back as far as 7,000 BC. The breed was a favorite among Egyptian pharaohs. These sighthounds are known for their slim and elegant build and impressive athleticism.Photo courtesy of iStock / Abramova_Kseniya

Samoyed – Siberia

The thick, white coat of the Samoyed makes them impervious to cold, including the minus-60 degree temperatures of their homeland in the Siberian town of Oymyakon. The upturned mouth corners that give these dogs their signature smile also prevent drooling, so no icicles will form on their faces.Photo courtesy of iStock / Slonov

Shar Pei – China

The wrinkly, blue-tongued Shar Pei originated in southern China during the Han Dynasty; the name translates to “sandy skin” for the breed’s rough coat. The breed’s numbers dwindled during the Cultural Revolution, but a Hong Kong breeder managed to drum up support from Americans to save the breed.Photo courtesy of iStock / irontrybex

Shiba Inu – Japan

This ancient Japanese breed is today the most popular companion dog in Japan. The breed has been around since 300 BC, when it was used as a hunter in Japan’s mountainous terrain. A military family brought the first Shiba to the U.S. in the 1950s.Photo courtesy of iStock / elenasendler

Shih Tzu – Western China

This beloved Chinese breed was likely a cross between the Pekingese and Lhaso Apso, a Tibetan dog once gifted to the Chinese imperial family by the Dalai Lama. The Shih Tzu quickly became the favored dog of Chinese royalty, and the country didn’t allow their export until the 1930s.Photo courtesy of iStock / format35

Siberian Husky – Siberia

The blue-eyed Siberian Husky comes from the Chukchi Peninsula of eastern Siberia, where they served as both companion dogs and endurance sled dogs. The breed garnered attention in the early 1900s, after they were brought to Alaska for sled dog races, which they began to win with increasing frequency.It was a pack of Siberian Huskies that made the 658-mile journey to Nome that would inspire the Iditarod.Photo courtesy of iStock / madcorona

Stabyhoun – Netherlands

The Stabyhoun, one of the rarest dog breeds in the world, comes from the Dutch province of Friesland, where it’s depicted and mentioned in 17th and 18th century art and literature.Photo courtesy of iStock / White_bcgrd

Thai Ridgeback – Thailand

The Thai Ridgeback was used as a hunting dog and to escort carts in the eastern part of Thailand. Poor transportation systems in the region meant the dogs had little opportunity to crossbreed, and the breed remains quite rare outside of their country of origin.Photo courtesy of iStock / ~User7565abab_575

Tibetan Mastiff – Tibet

These thick-coated giants can weigh in at well over 100 pounds. The full history of the Tibetan Mastiff is a bit of a mystery, but they’ve served as guardians in the isolated Himalayas for millennia as the progenitor of all other modern mastiff breeds.Photo courtesy of iStock / natenn

West Highland White Terrier – Scotland

The West Highland White Terrier, or Westie for short, has been winning the hearts of dog owners for more than three centuries. These smart and entertaining dogs were originally bred in Scotland and the British Isles to hunt rodents that carried disease and infested grain stores. The Malcolm clan bred them on their Poltalloch estate in the 1700s.Photo courtesy of iStock / TaynaPanova