Dogs Before Selective Breeding?

Dogs have been our furry companions for thousands of years, but they didn’t always look the way they do today. Many well-known dog breeds have changed a lot physically in the last century, thanks to humans.

Dogs of All Nations called it “the embodiment of agility, grace, elegance and determination”, and the “gladiator of the canine race”. But today, bull terriers are bred to have a football-shaped head and thick, squat body – a far cry from the lean and handsome dog of 1915.

The AKC now states that the dog’s face “should be oval in outline and be filled completely up giving the impression of fullness with a surface devoid of hollows or indentations, ie, egg shaped”. The AKC describes the ideal dog as having a “heavy, thick-set, low-swung body, massive short-faced head, wide shoulders and sturdy limbs”. But today’s german shepherds are bred to be considerably larger (75 to 95 lbs or 34 to 43 kg), with a more sloping back.

The AKC describes the ideal specimen as “a strong, agile, well muscled animal, alert and full of life”. Though you can’t tell from this photo, Dogs of All Nations described the colouring of the airedale’s head and ears as a rich tan, as well as the legs up to the thighs and elbows. Today, the colour appears not to have changed much, but the fur of modern Airedales definitely looks longer and more “ragged” than it was in 1915 (though why breeders value that now, we can’t say).

Did dogs come from selective breeding?

In the same way that inbreeding among human populations can increase the frequency of normally rare genes that cause diseases, the selective breeding that created the hundreds of modern dog breeds has put purebred dogs at risk for a large number of health problems, affecting both body and behavior.

What was the first dog breed on earth?

The world’s oldest known breed of domesticated dog is the saluki, believed to have emerged in 329 BC. Saluki dogs were revered in ancient Egypt, being kept as royal pets and being mummified after death.

When did we start selectively breeding dogs?

Breeding becomes a hobby. Breeding as we know it today is a fairly recent invention. For the most part, it wasn’t until the 19th century that people began to keep records of canine bloodlines and to classify dogs into specific breeds rather than generic types such as hunting dog, hound, herding dog, or lap dog.

What did first dogs look like?

Skeletal analysis revealed, “the Paleolithic dogs had wider and shorter snouts and relatively wider brain cases than fossil and recent wolves,” said Germonpré, who added that their skulls were also somewhat smaller than those of wolves.

By identifying specific traits such as size, coat color, and demeanor and allowing only those animals to mate, we’ve created at least 167 different “breeds,” or groups of dogs with unique physical and mental characteristics. Still, they’re all part of the same species.

Dogs of All Nations” called it “the embodiment of agility, grace, elegance and determination,” and the “gladiator of the canine race.” But today, bull terriers are bred to have a football-shaped head and a thick, squat body a far cry from the lean and handsome dog of 1915.

The AKC now states that the dog’s face “should be oval in outline and be filled completely up giving the impression of fullness with a surface devoid of hollows or indentations, i.e., egg shaped.” Today, breeders have bred the bulldog to have more pronounced facial wrinkles, and an even thicker and squatter body. The AKC describes the ideal dog as having a “heavy, thick-set, low-swung body, massive short-faced head, wide shoulders and sturdy limbs.”

Sadly, bulldogs suffer from a number of health issues, such as breathing problems and overheating. But today’s German shepherds are bred to be considerably larger 75 to 95 pounds with a more sloping back. The AKC describes the ideal specimen as “a strong, agile, well muscled animal, alert and full of life.”

Today, the color appears not to have changed much, but the fur of modern Airedales definitely looks longer and more “ragged” than it was in 1915 though why breeders value that now, we can’t say. The Shetland sheepdog, or Sheltie, wasn’t recognized by the American Kennel Club until 1911, just four years before the book this image is from was published. By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Dogs have been around humans for over 30,000 years now and have earned themselves the title of humans’ best friends. But ever since they were domesticated, the species has gone through dramatic changes due to selective breeding. Whether the changes were physical or mental, people have bred dogs for their own advantage, sometimes causing the animals some severe health problems.

Unfortunately, it has been linked to breathing problems and other health issues. The face of the bull terrier became shorter, while the jaws as well as the bridge of the nose became larger.

Irish setters haven’t changed much, except for a longer and thicker coat they now have and a slightly thinner body. This cutie hasn’t changed a lot during the years (probably because he was already so darn cute), but the fur became a little bit longer and thicker. The Old English sheepdog used to be much shaggier than it is today.

The hind legs of the basset hound became shorter, while the ears became a lot longer. The body shape of Dobermann became more slender, while the ears look slightly different, too. Today, the sausage dogs have a longer face and body.

Also, a chest that’s slightly wider and hind leggiesshorter. While they appear rather similar, Newfoundlands were likely much smaller than they are today. “Dogs of all Nations” writes that the breed weighed somewhere around 100 pounds back in 1915, whereas today, Newfoundland males can weigh up to 150 pounds.

Over the course of 100 years, German shepherds became larger, while their fur became longer and thicker. The skeleton has changed slightly too, while the chest of these majestic dogs is now wider. The coat of the Scottish terrier is now much longer, and also has a slightly different texture, which makes it softer.

These cuties haven’t changed much, except for a shaggier coat and a longer face with more fur. As you can see, Rottweilers today don’t have a docked tail anymore. During 100 years, the Shetland Sheepdog has doubled in size, while its fur also became longer.

The body shape of the Boxer was obviously altered, while their faces used to be longer and more downturned than they are today. These adorable balls of fluff weighed around 50 pounds a century ago. Today, they are also thinner, have longer ears, and legs that are thin and long.

However, it was only in the 20th when the process became more sophisticated as new methods of selective breeding were discovered. Hence, the way popular dog breeds look today may differ greatly from how they did a century ago. Therefore, Bored Panda has made you a short list comparing how these 18 popular dog breeds looked 100 years ago versus how they look today.

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The Science of Dogs blog put together a side-by-side comparison of several popular breeds from the 1915 book “Dogs of All Nations” by Walter Esplin Mason, showing what they look like today.Here are some of the dogs from that list, plus a couple more we found ourselves:The bull terrier was first recognized as a breed by the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1885. In 1915, it appears to have been a fit, good-looking dog, with a well-proportioned head and slim torso. “Dogs of All Nations” called it “the embodiment of agility, grace, elegance and determination,” and the “gladiator of the canine race.”But today, bull terriers are bred to have a football-shaped head and a thick, squat body — a far cry from the lean and handsome dog of 1915.The AKC now states that the dog’s face “should be oval in outline and be filled completely up giving the impression of fullness with a surface devoid of hollows or indentations, i.e., egg shaped.” According to Science of Dogs, it also developed extra teeth and a habit of chasing its tail.Few dogs have been as artificially shaped by breeding as the English bulldog. In the UK, the dogs were used for bull-baiting — a blood sport where dogs were used to bait and attack bulls — until it became illegal in 1835. In 1915, the bulldog already had some of the characteristic features we see today, like saggy jowls and a squat stance.Today, breeders have bred the bulldog to have more pronounced facial wrinkles, and an even thicker and squatter body. The AKC describes the ideal dog as having a “heavy, thick-set, low-swung body, massive short-faced head, wide shoulders and sturdy limbs.” Sadly, bulldogs suffer from a number of health issues, such as breathing problems and overheating.German shepherds have come to symbolize everything from loyalty and companionship to police brutality. The AKC first recognized is as a breed in 1908. In 1915, “Dogs of All Nations” described it as a “medium sized dog” weighing just 55 pounds, with a “deep chest, straight back and strong loins.”But today’s German shepherds are bred to be considerably larger — 75 to 95 pounds — with a more sloping back. The AKC describes the ideal specimen as “a strong, agile, well muscled animal, alert and full of life.”But they are also prone to health problems, such as hip dysplasia, where the leg bones don’t fit properly into the hip socket, and bloat, a condition in which the stomach can expand with air and twist, which can sometimes be fatal.Though you can’t tell from this photo, “Dogs of All Nations” described the coloring of theAiredale’s head and ears as a rich tan, as well as the legs up to the thighs and elbows. And the dog’s coat was “hard and wiry,” but not long enough to be “ragged.”Today, the color appears not to have changed much, but the fur of modern Airedales definitely looks longer and more “ragged” than it was in 1915 — though why breeders value that now, we can’t say. Airedales are considered the largest of all terriers, and are sporting and playful.The Shetland sheepdog, or Sheltie, wasn’t recognized by the American Kennel Club until 1911, just four years before the book this image is from was published. At that time, the book reported that it weighed just 7 to 10 pounds and appeared to have medium-length fur.Today, the dogs have been bred to be larger, weighing at least 20 pounds, though still sleight. And their fur has become unmistakably longer than in 1915. The AKC now describes them as “small, alert, rough-coated, long-haired working” dogs. They are also very intelligent, and good at herding.• The 100 coolest people in UK tech

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Dogs have been around humans for over 30,000 years now and have earned themselves the title of humans’ best friends. But ever since they were domesticated, the species has gone through dramatic changes due to selective breeding. Whether the changes were physical or mental, people have bred dogs for their own advantage, sometimes causing the animals some severe health problems.However, it was only in the 20th when the process became more sophisticated as new methods of selective breeding were discovered. Hence, the way popular dog breeds look today may differ greatly from how they did a century ago. Therefore,More info: Dogs of All NationsThis post may include affiliate links.

Bull Terrier

The face of the bull terrier became shorter, while the jaws as well as the bridge of the nose became larger. The body shape became more muscular and legs—shorter.

Irish Setter

Irish setters haven’t changed much, except for a longer and thicker coat they now have and a slightly thinner body.

West Highland white terrier

This cutie hasn’t changed a lot during the years (probably because he was already so darn cute), but the fur became a little bit longer and thicker.The old one looked almost like a Cairn terrier. I have read that Westies, Cairns and Scottish terriers were bred together and the breed of the pup was decided at birth – by its color. Quite hilarious, if you ask any modern dog breeder.

Old English sheepdog

The Old English sheepdog used to be much shaggier than it is today. Apart from that, the looks haven’t changed much over the last 100 years.The present one had more contact with a brush, I’d say.

Basset Hound

The hind legs of the basset hound became shorter, while the ears became a lot longer. Their face also became shorter, and the skin now has more folds than it did before.

Dobermann

The body shape of Dobermann became more slender, while the ears look slightly different, too. Also, they’re not as aggressive as they used to be a century ago.

Dachshund

Today, the sausage dogs have a longer face and body. Also, a chest that’s slightly wider and hind leggies—shorter.Longer body and shorter legs. In other words, more health issues.

Newfoundland

While they appear rather similar, Newfoundlands were likely much smaller than they are today. “Dogs of all Nations” writes that the breed weighed somewhere around 100 pounds back in 1915, whereas today, Newfoundland males can weigh up to 150 pounds.Fun fact: In Disney’s 1953 Peter Pan, Nana is a Newfoundland. At the time they were often used as “babysitters” because they’re so gentle, but protective of their family.

German Shepherd

Over the course of 100 years, German shepherds became larger, while their fur became longer and thicker. The skeleton has changed slightly too, while the chest of these majestic dogs is now wider.I hate that modern ones’ back legs have been tailored to make them appear crouching and cowed.

Scottish Terrier

The coat of the Scottish terrier is now much longer, and also has a slightly different texture, which makes it softer. 100 years ago, their coat used to be wiry.why do people breed dogs to die so fast and make life harder ?

Airedale Terrier

These cuties haven’t changed much, except for a shaggier coat and a longer face with more fur.

Rottweiler

As you can see, Rottweilers today don’t have a docked tail anymore. Also, their coat is now coarser than it was before.

Shetland Sheepdog

During 100 years, the Shetland Sheepdog has doubled in size, while its fur also became longer.But… they’re tiny NOW, how have they been even smaller back then?

Boxer

The body shape of the Boxer was obviously altered, while their faces used to be longer and more downturned than they are today.

Great Dane

These long-legged dogs used to weigh less than they do today. According to “Dogs of All Nations,” they used to weigh around 120 pounds, while today, males can reach up to 175 pounds.Again with weaker headquarters and back and now a squarer, more jowly jaw

Chow Chow

These adorable balls of fluff weighed around 50 pounds a century ago. Today, they weigh up to 75 pounds. In addition to this, the faces of Chow Chows became more wrinkly.