Dog Peeing on Fire Hydrant?

If you’re a dog owner, you’ve probably been walking your dog at one point or another and noticed your dog specifically seeking out fire hydrants. They circle it a few times, and then promptly urinate over its surface. So, what is it about the fire hydrant that is just so attractive to dogs? Is there something about the shape, the paint, or do they really just like peeing on metal things? While there aren’t any definitive answers, a lot of conjecture exists that points in multiple directions. Below are outlines of some of the more prevalent causes put forth by animals behaviorists and veterinarians.

If you’re a canine breeder, a dog that’s carrying a litter can have hormone imbalances that will confuse their normal instincts.

Why does my dog pee on the fire hydrant?

One of the foremost explanations for this behavior is that your dog is catching the scent of another animal. Canines are genetically disposed to marking their territory with urine. In ancient times, this served as a form of communication to other dogs letting them know territorial borders.

Do all dogs pee on fire hydrants?

Intact male dogs do this most often. Some of this is related to territory and dominance while some is also sending a signal to any available ladies on the same walking route that there’s an eligible bachelor nearby. Intact dogs, especially males, may also urine mark in the presence of another dog.

How do I get my dog to pee in the fire hydrant?

This fire hydrant is scented to give your dog an object to sniff and aim at. Most dogs are attracted to certain scents or even their own urine smell. We recommend an object like this for male dogs in particular. Dog trainers suggest using your own dog’s urine to wipe on the hydrant.

Do dogs hump fire hydrants?

When your dog passes the fire hydrant, they want to mark their scent for other dogs to know that they have been there. This is normal behavior and dogs do it to other objects like trees or bushes.

Why do dogs pee on fire hydrants? Walking your dog is a good opportunity to become aware of his behaviour. Youre just walking by him and letting him do his thing, but you couldnt help but notice that he prefers certain places for peeing, especially water hydrants.

So, theres not much you can do to stop a dogs love story for the fire hydrant and any upright vertical object they can use as a marking of their territory.

Canines are notorious for answering the call of nature in the most inappropriate places (the flower garden, live fence, yard, wall, your neighbors lawn, etc.).

A fire hydrant is a great tool to train your canine buddy to direct his urine in the right place. Dogs love peeing on upright objects such as trees, plants, garbage cans, walls, and car tires among others.

So, what can you do when your dog prefers to pee on a wrong object in your yard or home? A fire hydrant can be used to divert your dogs peeing behavior into a specific area of your choosing. Well, in urban areas, many dogs prefer to do their business on real fire hydrants.

Dogs urine can also destroy your picturesque patio space or lawn if left uncontrolled. Some fire hydrants also come with storage spaces, so if you install such options indoors, you can keep your dogs leashes, toys, treats, and other supplies in them. The classic red fire hydrant from Design Toscano is one of the leading products in the market in its category.

Despite the metal construction, the statue is lightweight (weighs only four pounds) and makes it a great place for your pup to pee. The colors are bold and realistic to give your dog an easy experience adapting it. The statue is lightweight and has a wider base to keep it strong against winds and storms.

It is a perfect size (14 inches tall) and comes with two plastic stakes that help it to stay put on the ground. If you are looking for a fire replica that can help you protect your lawn from ugly patches caused by your dogs pee, this fake hydrant from JHP is what you need. The statue stands at a height of 14 inches and is meticulously designed with a durable resin featuring a beautiful red and white finish.

The Pine Ridge Fire Hydrant is a little appealing statue thats mainly used outdoors as a potty training tool. It is a stylish fake replica of a real fire hydrant with all the metallic bolts and nuts. Artificial grass doesnt require any cutting and can be easily cleaned with a hose.

Place it on the edges or far corners of your yard to prevent potential nitrogen burns on your flowers and grass. It will also lower your chances of steeping on your dogs mess because he is likely to poop in the surrounding areas. For easy waste disposal, install the hydrant as close to your garbage can as possible.

To ensure that your dogs fire hydrant last as long as possible, consider adding a protective layer or paint like Rust-Oleum , especially if it doesnt come with a special coating. Although dogs love to pee on fire hydrants, they tend to be picky when it comes to specifics. Construction
Material: Most common fire hydrants are made from metals, plastic, and
resin.

Resin options are durable, can be
hand-painted, and sometimes feature distress finish, giving them a rustic look. On the other hand, metal hydrants are sturdier, heavy, might feature distress
finish, and may cost more. You can also fill them with sand or gravel to boost their stability, especially if you live in windy regions.

But if your dogs urination is only part of the problem, consult your vet so that additional tests can be done.

Introduction

If you’re a dog owner, you’ve probably been walking your dog at one point or another and noticed your dog specifically seeking out fire hydrants. They circle it a few times, and then promptly urinate over its surface. So, what is it about the fire hydrant that is just so attractive to dogs? Is there something about the shape, the paint, or do they really just like peeing on metal things? While there aren’t any definitive answers, a lot of conjecture exists that points in multiple directions. Below are outlines of some of the more prevalent causes put forth by animals behaviorists and veterinarians.

The Root of the Behavior

One of the foremost explanations for this behavior is that your dog is catching the scent of another animal. Canines are genetically disposed to marking their territory with urine. In ancient times, this served as a form of communication to other dogs letting them know territorial borders. If you have yet to “fix” your dog, the instinct for territorial marking will in most cases be noticeably stronger. If you own a female dog in heat, quite often visiting dogs will mark the places that she might normally lie. Dog owners who get their animals at a young age won’t see these sort of behaviors until adolescence or beyond. Another type of urination often perpetrated by your pup is something referred to as overmarking. This will often occur when your dog catches the scent of a wild animal or neighbor dog. In these cases, they will often purposefully urinate over the previously scented area. For your dog, the purpose is to erase the former scent and replace it with his or her own. Doing so also communicates the statement that he’s higher up in the pack order.If you got your dog from a shelter, consideration should be paid to its origins. It is entirely possible that they never learned how to urinate indoors. Dogs that have spent 10 years peeing wherever they please are going to be pretty confused upon learning that that’s no longer acceptable. This can be remedied with a strong sense of dedication to your dog‘s behavior. if you’re unsure about proper training techniques, this is a great question for your vet. It’s also true that your canine companion could just be getting really pumped about something. When your dog experiences something emotionally, it can externalize itself with urination. When this happens, it is often paired with its ears rolling back or a full body quiver. This is almost always a sign of more problems down the road, and should be brought to your vet’s attention.

Encouraging the Behavior

So what is it about the fire hydrants that gets your dog all excited? Turns out, it could actually be the dyes inside of the paint used for most municipal hydrants. A lot of veterinarians have suggested that something in the scent actually smells “sweet” to your canine, and replicates canine urine to a certain degree. While this certainly wasn’t planned by the cities themselves, it is terribly ironic. You can usually see this sort of behavior in action when you have your dog outside for a moderate length of time. It’s an unusual behavior for them to be marking things inside of your house. For female canines, you can sometimes see peeing when they are entering heat. Of course, this only happens if you haven’t had your dog spayed. If you’re a canine breeder, a dog that’s carrying a litter can have hormone imbalances that will confuse their normal instincts. Oftentimes, they can even urinate on their own markings because their noses aren’t operating as they usually do. So what about those emergency situations where your dog can’t stop ruining your possessions with its pee? Doggie doors seem to be a hugely popular options. They’re basically reinforced baby gates, and can keep your dog restricted to “safe” areas.

Other Solutions and Considerations

Another option are doggy diapers. They come in a variety of sizes, and don’t restrict your dog‘s movement. They will, however, restrict the ability for it to pee on anything you deem important or valuable. These are sold primarily online, or can be special ordered through your vet. If your dog‘s urination is only part of the problem, you may want to get additional tests done. Bladder issues can often be causing sudden incontinence. If you notice that your dog is licking it’s sensitive areas more than it usually does, this is yet another issue to bring up at your dog‘s normal vet checkup.