Dog Paw Yeast Infection Treatment?

A yeast infection on a dogs paw is actually a very common problem for dogs and is a common reason for itchy paws. And although dogs can suffer from yeast infections and itchy skin on just about any portion of their bodies, the paws are one of the most common places a yeast infection occurs.

Many yeasts are ubiquitous and found throughout the environment; some even live on the skin and inside the ears of dogs. These types of yeasts are usually contracted from a single portal of entry, as the Merck Veterinary Manual explains, before being disseminated to multiple locations or organ systems.

Some of the bacteria that normally live on your dogs skin also help to compete with the yeasts and further restrict their growth. However, when your dog consumes an overabundance of carbohydrates, suffers from an autoimmune disease or experiences a disruption in the normal microbial flora of the skin, the yeast population can explode. The yeast cells can produce hyphal outgrowths, which penetrate the skin or mucous membranes, leading to irritation.

Both areas have numerous skin folds and crevices that can trap moisture and provide the environmental conditions that are conducive to yeast growth. Additionally, your dogs paws are frequently in contact with the ground, which is often contaminated with yeast organisms. Infections also commonly occur on other portions of the skin, the nasal passages or in the urinary tract.

Typically, yeast infections occur in one location, but they can afflict multiple areas of the body in rare cases. German Shepherd West Highland White Terrier Basset Hound Maltese Shih Tzu Cocker Spaniel English Setter If your dog is a member of one of the breeds listed above or fits into one of the aforementioned categories, youll want to remain observant for the first signs of a yeast infection.

This way, you can begin treatment promptly and hopefully stop the problem before it causes serious symptoms. The first thing youll want to do anytime you suspect your dog is suffering from a yeast infection in his paws (or anywhere else) is to visit your vet . Additionally, yeast infections of the paws can be secondary to other medical problems.

This will cause your dogs toes to remain moist for long periods of time, which, when combined with the original condition that caused the itchiness, often allows yeasts to colonize your dogs feet. In these types of cases, youll have to treat both the yeast infection on the paws and the underlying problem to have success otherwise, the yeast infection may not respond to the treatment, or it may return after going away for a short time. To get to the bottom of possible yeast infection on your dogs paw, your vet will likely begin by taking a detailed history.

Your vet will probably collect a sample of the discharge or scabs around the afflicted areas too, as this will help provide a positive identification. Usually, these medicines will take the form of shampoos, wipes, sprays or topical creams, but oral medications are sometimes required in serious cases. While youll need your vets help to both identify and treat a yeast infection on dog paws, you can do a few things to help prevent them from occurring and accelerate the healing process.

Yeast loves damp, moist crevices, and your dogs wet paws can provide exactly these types of conditions. This can be especially problematic if his paws are allowed to remain wet for long periods of time. Your dogs paws are likely to collect yeasts, bacteria, and other pathogens while on walks, so it may be wise to clean them off once you get home.

Theres probably nothing wrong with giving your dog the occasional French fry or steamed carrot, but dont make it a habit. This means your dogs paws will remain damp for long periods of time, which will provide the kind of conditions that allow yeasts to thrive. You can check out our guide to the best flea treatments for dogs to find a good solution for your pet.

A 25% to 50% solution of apple cider may help get your dogs yeast infection under control. Vinegar has a low (acidic) pH, which can help make the skin on your dogs paws less hospitable to yeasts. Just use a little bit, as you dont want your dogs paws to stay wet for very long.

The best yeast infection treatment for dogs paws is to visit your vet and use a prescription anti-fungal medication. While it is difficult to completely eliminate the possibility of yeast infections, you can reduce the chances that your dog will suffer from one by keeping his paws and ears dry, feeding a nutritious food, and using a good preventative flea treatment. It is also wise to limit the amount of people food you feed your pet.

Just dab the solution on your dogs paws with a cotton ball about once per day until the infection disappears. Accordingly, most yeast infections occur when a dog is already battling some other health condition. They can, however, occur on any portion of your dogs skin, as well as internal organs, such as the bladder.

How do I know if my dog has a yeast infection on his paws?

Skin redness or itching..Sticky or yellow/green discharge..Sores..Greasy coat..Hair loss..Smelly skin..Thickening skin..Crusty, flaky skin.

Can I put apple cider vinegar on my dog's paws?

If your dog is notorious for chewing and licking their paws, you can also soak each paw in ACV for a moment or two to relieve itchiness. For general skin and coat health, add one tablespoon to food or water every day. Apple cider vinegar has proven to be extremely beneficial to the skin and fur!

Yeast are spore-producing fungi that are always present on a dogs skin, usually in low numbers, as part of the normal flora. A yeast infection happens when theres an excessive amount of yeast in a certain area.

This means that there is some other issue that is weakening the skins defense mechanisms to allow the yeast to grow in higher numbers than normal. Other underlying issues that may cause yeast infections in dogs include hormonal problems or other diseases that suppress the immune system.

There are no studies to confirm that any of the following cause yeast infections on a dogs skin: Yeast infections can cause red, irritated, or itchy skin or ears, and there is often a sweet or musty odor. Chronic yeast infections can cause the skin to become thickened and discolored (gray, brown, or black).

Yeast infections can occur anywhere on a dogs skin, including the belly. The affected skin may be red, irritated, itchy, greasy, or flaky, and there may be hair loss. Usually, you will see redness, which may extend onto the flap of the ear, and the discharge is generally brown.

Yeast infections in a dogs ears generally cause redness, a brown discharge, head shaking or rubbing, odor, and itching. Ear mite infections are extremely itchy and can cause many of the same symptoms. Ear mites are barely visible to the naked eye and highly contagious to other animals.

Your veterinarian may perform cytology (taking a swab of the discharge and staining it to look at it under the microscope) to diagnose a yeast infection in a dogs ears. Treatments for yeast infections on the skin can include topical antifungal creams, wipes, sprays, and shampoos. Topical ingredients that are effective in treating yeast include chlorhexidine, miconazole, and ketoconazole .

Oral antifungal medications used in dogs include fluconazole, terbinafine, ketoconazole, and itraconazole. People often talk about home remedies for dog yeast infections, but most are not proven to be effective. There are no studies to confirm that feeding any of the following is beneficial in treating yeast on a dogs skin:

There are no studies to confirm that topical use of any of the following are useful in treating yeast infections in dogs: Vinegar rinses do have scientific data to support that they may be beneficial in treating yeast. Vinegar helps to change the pH of the skin to make it less favorable for yeast.

However, for shampoo treatment to be effective, the lather must sit on a dogs skin for a minimum of 10 minutes before rinsing. If you suspect that your dog has a yeast infection, consult your regular veterinarian for a diagnosis and treatment plan that is appropriate for your pet.

Just like any other dog skin condition, prevention is better than cure so it is important to understand what factors will make your pooch prone to dog paw yeast infections.

If your dog is licking his paws, scratching his ears, and smells like a bag of corn chips, a loaf of old sourdough bread from San Francisco, a musty old attic, or something you recognize as budding yeast, he needs your help. Those smells are caused by a type of yeast on your dog‘s skin called Malassezia pachydermatis. When your dog has a mild case of yeast overgrowth, he will just scratch his ears, smell his feet, and then go back to his nap.

Dogs that have allergies and have been put on antibiotics and immunosuppressants (steroids, cyclosporine, and apoquel) are common victims of yeast infections. Yeast are normal organisms that live on the skin and can overproliferate if conditions allow, especially in those moist areas like the underarms, between the toes, and in the ear canals of the floppy-eared breeds.

Do not pay attention to those instructions about removing the shampoo quickly so that the healthy oils are not stripped from your dog‘s skin. You need to remove the waxy buildup and the thick crust of yeast that is bothering your dog. After wetting your dog down, put a good quantity of shampoo on them, massage it in, and then leave it for about 10 minutes.

Benzoyl peroxide shampoo is the best choice to remove all of the waxy material built up on the skin and deep down into the pores. Since some people get rashes and itchy skin from bathing dogs with this problem, I think it is important that you use rubber gloves. After removing most of the wax and yeast with the benzoyl peroxide shampoo, use vinegar to kill most of what is left.

At this point, roll your dog over and apply coconut oil to all of the areas that have been affected by the yeast. Organic ACV contains the mother,” which is a type of probiotic containing lactobacillus and other bacteria that might return the skin’s normal flora after a yeast infection. Free radicals cause wrinkling and other aging effects similar to that seen with damage from Malassezia infections.

The fatty acids present in coconut oil also help the skin heal from scratches secondary to the yeast infection. If your dog has a yeast infection on his paws, especially if he is already limping, you might need to try several things until you find something that works. Westies are prone to allergies, so if allowed to lick their feet, they will often have problems with yeast.

To prevent this problem from coming back as soon as it is cleared up, you need to change your dog‘s diet so that he no longer is eating foods that make yeast proliferate. Any dog food with grains, a carbohydrate filler, or high fructose corn syrup should be avoided. If your dog has inhalant allergies and this problem only shows up in the summer, apply coconut oil between the toes and on the inner ear flaps twice a week.

In order to keep your dog‘s yeast infection from coming back, you need to switch from a commercial diet that has grains, sugars, cheap fillers, and moist and meaty products with high fructose corn syrup. You can give him chicken necks and feet, chicken wings, ox tails, trachea and lungs from cows, raw tripe, whole rabbits or Egyptian quail, and if you live in a rural area you can buy old laying hens for just a few dollars each. If you live in the city you can usually buy large bags of chicken wings for a low price.

Yeast are a normal part of the skin and a test might show how many of the Malasezzia bodies are on the slide but it will always come up positive. Some of the commonly prescribed drugs are ketoconazole, fluconazole, and itraconazole; they are given a few weeks after the dog is no longer showing any symptoms. If your dog has a lot of folds in his skin and also has allergies, they are a prime candidate for a yeast infection.

French Bulldogs have a lot of folds and are also subject to problems so those areas prone to yeast need to be kept clean. I have seen many cases in West Highland White Terriers, especially dogs suffering from allergies and chronic ear infections. A dogs behavior may change with the onset of chronic health issues because they feel so lousy.

There has been a reported case of a person working in a nursery and carrying the yeast from her sick dog to the newborns in intensive care. If you have any health problems (AIDs or a disease that has left you immunocompromised), or you are on any medications that have damaged your immune system, you need to consider safety precautions. At times, like when your dog is vomiting blood, has a bad cut, or needs to be spayed, it is a great thing to have a vet that can help.

Conventional treatment: Etienne Ct DVM, Clinical Veterinary Advisor, Dogs and Cats, 2 nd Edition, Elsevier, 2011 Toxicity of fungal medications: Stephen Ettinger DVM, Textbook of Veterinary Internal Medicine, 6 th Edition, Saunders, 2005 Secondary Infections: Stephen Barr DVM, Clinical Companion Canine and Feline Infectious Diseases, Blackwell, 2006

Holistic Therapies: Richard Pitcairn DVM, Natural Health for Dogs and Cats, 3 rd Edition, Rodale, 2005 It is not meant to substitute for diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, prescription, or formal and individualized advice from a veterinary medical professional. Question: What is the best brand of dry dog food that doesnt cause yeast infections?

Even those that claim they are grain free still use carbohydrate sources to make the dog food cheaper. Question: How often do I spray apple cider vinegar on my dog to treat a yeast infection? Question: Can I spray the ACV mix in the dog‘s ears to treat a yeast infection?

The acidic product will make it difficult for yeast and bacteria to thrive in the ear canal. As pointed out in the article, stay away from grains, carbohydrate fillers, and foods with high fructose corn syrup. My Pitbull likes to go out and find a nice spot to lie in the sun, even when it is a hot day.

If he just likes to hang around you, consider taking a book or newspaper to the park and sitting outside with him for a half hour each day. Try to grow your own and when you have bathed your dog and removed the excess wax try to coat the area with the gel from the middle part of an aloe leaf. Answer: The kind of yeast infection that affects a dogs skin, Malassezia, is not picked up from moldly walls, nor from running around in the yard or being close to a septic tank.

If your dog has a lot of folds that continue to get infected with yeast, you may need to keep them clean and treated with the vinegar several times a week. Answer: It is difficult to give a firm recommendation because it depends on how bad things have progressed. Free radicals can cause some of the damage to a yeast infected skin, like the wrinkles.

Coconut oil also acts as a moisturizer, and allow the skin to heal, aiding in closing the small scratches from the itching associated with yeast infection. Answer: Feeding a healthy diet does not need to be expensive, but it does take a little more effort than just opening the dog food bag and pouring out a cup each evening. If you think about it, you will realize that after several dilutions none of the original substance is even left.

Some dogs will have very greasy skin with a yeast infection and need to be bathed and treated a few times per week. You need to bathe the dogs entire body, then apply the vinegar, and then you can use the coconut oil as a more localized treatment. If your dog has a yeast infection she has greasy skin and the best way to remove it is benzoyl peroxide, as suggested in the article.

If your dog is itching a lot and does not have greasy skin with a yeast infection, the best shampoo is colloidal oatmeal. Answer: When you use the coconut oil as the article suggests, your dog will lick some of it off of his or her skin. I prefer to use it topically, as described in the article, and have seen excellent results.If you want to use it in the water also it does not hurt, as long as you do not add too much.

My vizsla has been fed raw since I had her at 12 weeks but I was including lots of carrot, sweet potatoes, and other veggies. I have shampooed him with medicated every week for awhile a seemed to have the odor under control but his skins is so dry now everything is covered with dandruff. Good reading doc .my long haired German shepherd has yeast infection on the back of both front legs.

Some dogs and some breeds tend to have more greasy skin and develop secondary infections easily. I have a Cocker Spaniel that I pet rescued over 3 years ago, I fell in love with him at first sight. She has severe yeast infections, her belly all the down her legs all black elephant skin and hot sore certain areas.

I alway give mine250mg phenoxeth-penicillin 4mg piriton Every 4 hours on a flat up and omeprazole 20mg am I doinb the right thing when my she-pei get a yeast infection it effects her guts stinky wind and mouth Hi I am desperate, my 10 year old labradoodle has suffered with constant ear infections for 8 years, she has had 2 operations for aural hematoma one been the other day, I am doing everything the vet has told me to do cleaning them changing her diet but they just keep coming back, I have been researching for months a more natural way, as he keeps putting her on steroids which I do not want, I just want someone to help that doesnt just wants hundreds of pounds every time I go see them and not get anywhere, as I feel he doesnt care and makes me feel like Im the worst dog owner I am literally desperate now to get this sorted once and for all please help Primal freeze dried dog food is an excellent source of raw for people who don’t have the time to make their own.

Hives, then hair falling out accompanied by huge or small black oval shaped spots and now bleeding. I now regularly bathe him with an anti fungal shampoo and spray a mix of ACV and coconut oil. I do not trust the veterinarian here, because my dog in my country bans to get some treatment so I can help Lucy as soon as possible.

My dog is finally on the mend after a couple months of feeding meat, salmon, greens and all sorts of supplements. The benzoyl peroxide shampoo every other day (began 2.5 weeks ago) turned her around along with organic ACV. Sheena, after using the benzoyl peroxide shampoo to remove most of the grease you can apply the ACV when still wet.

Thank you I have taken him off the meds now and for the last 3 days I have been bathing him in medicated shampoo using apple cider viniger everyday and coconut oil as you said also I have strictly been giving him chicken boiled in a spoon full of garlic, and all green veggies with a spoon full of natural yogut that’s all he’s been eating he’s skin seems to be really red at the moment I’m getting worried encase I make him worse?? Is the apple cider and coconut oil completely safe for my french bulldog if he has a yeast problem with his skin? Please can you help me I have adopted a french bulldog he is two he stinks is completely red under his neck inbetween his folds in his face paws and belly he itches and rubs himself across the carpet I’ve seen 3 vets in 3 weeks of having him he’s on aquapuel I think it’s called and now steroid tablets they gave me hibiscrub to bath him in but nothing is working he’s not alergic to anything as far as we no do you think it’s safe for me to take him off the meds and try the apple cider vinigar with the coconut oil?

I’m having no joy with any vet that I have seen so far and it’s costing me a fortune he’s a fit and healthy dog apart from this yeast infection problem he absolutely stinks thou Take some ACV, wet a paper towel, and apply a small amount between the toes of one foot. There are a lot of human ointments that might help but dogs are likely to just drag their chin along the carpet and just wipe the cream off, so a shampoo for ten minutes, a rinse, and then apply ACV using a paper towel, is the best thing.

I’ve been cleaning her chin, lady parts and ears twice a day with Malacetic wet wipes and diluted tea tree oil for the past week but I don’t see a difference. I’ve also changed her diet to raw veg and boiled chicken, and salmon oil and give her antihistamine. In August he broke with hives head to toe, began itching and shedding excessively.

Have given Quericitin, biotin, Vit E, olive oil, lysine, MSM, minimal garlic, ACV in water. Sharleen, if your dog has a yeast infection the ACV and coconut oil work together, not an either/or situation. The spray works in most areas but with some dogs, or breeds like the English bulldog, you have to wipe down deep into the folds to kill the yeast.

Our girl was treated twice over 2 months for a ‘cocci’ bacterial infection with antibiotics, steroids and benadryl for 14 days each time. Last time our vet said she has a terrible case of elephant skin on ber private parts. She broke out this week with the same weepy puss filled sores they told me was a bacterial infection.

The last vet visit was $700 that included testing for thyroid dysfunction but came back normal. One last thing, we’re also giving her a mushroom biomass powder to help build her immune system. My rescue lab is allergic to a myriad of items, and, on top of this, she was grossly fat when I got her, which has resulted in a lot of loose skin around the neck and elbows.

To complicate this, the SPCA has become involved, due to some busybody who couldn’t just come and ask what was wrong with her, and as far as they’re concerned, I should be willing to drop a couple thousand (that I don’t have) to deal with it, or rehome her. (IF I even found anyone willing to take an older, unattractive animal with behavioural challenges, who is going to cost them two or three hundred $ a month, she would then turn mean because of her severe separation anxiety.) It’s a long story about “Lucy” fungus agony with trying everything including Vet’s Apoquel and Topamax treatments which became ineffective after three or four months.

I reasoned that Miconazole might work so I began looking into that along with people’s recommendations for vinegar, coconut oil, etc. Well, diluted vinegar set her on fire and we had to get it off her and coconut oil made her a walking grease ball. My other go-to for any raw spots or sores your dog may acquire for any reason can be treated safely and successfully with diluted Equate First Aid Antiseptic povidone iodine solution…same thing used in hospitals to paint skin in areas they are working on.

Too long of a story but she had another from the breeder before that cocktail and not sure of that one but after the last one being a DAP, and she, the vet said was going to be a distemper, parvo but when i seen bill, had that Adeno included. She will be 6 in November and will be kept intact with close veterinary care as suggested by Dr. Benjamin Hart, professor, UC DAVIS School of Veterinary Medicine and their many years of research with golden retrievers, esp the females that had most significant amounts of cancers that they followed, as said, while 3 percent still got cancers, ones that were spayed had 4 times that of the 3 percent, so he said in an email to me, if he was Brandy 2’s caregiver, he would not have her spayed, but said it would be with close veterinary care… My ginger bulldog has been on your program for several weeks, she is active and happy but her skin looks worse.

I tried a 24 hr kale & yogurt detox for her kidneys & liver, because articles said the dying yeast causes them to be toxic and to continue the program. The chlorhexidine is a good disinfectant to use in the meantime in those raw areas, but as soon as it looks a little better try to spray something acidic on the skin. I am now spraying her daily with a mix of Chlorhexidine, but only after I laboriously try to remove the crusty patches to allow the antiseptic to work on her skin.

Skin

Yeast infections can occur anywhere on a dog’s skin, including the belly. They are often seen in areas that are moist, such as in skin folds, especially in “wrinkly” dog breeds.The affected skin may be red, irritated, itchy, greasy, or flaky, and there may be hair loss.If the infection is chronic, the skin may thicken and become darker in color. Yeast infections on a dog’s mouth or face can cause extreme itching or face rubbing.

Paws

A dog with yeast infections on their paws can have red, irritated, and itchy paws.The underside of the paws, between the pads, is affected most often, but yeast can occur anywhere on the paws. Sometimes a brown discharge can be seen in the nail beds.Dogs with yeast infections on the paws usually lick their paws more than normal. There may also be hair loss.

Ears

Dog ear yeast infections are quite common, and the ears often smell sweet or musty.Usually, you will see redness, which may extend onto the flap of the ear, and the discharge is generally brown. The ear may appear to be greasy, and the hair may be matted.Yeast infections in a dog’s ears can be very itchy, causing dogs to scratch their ears or rub their head excessively.

What’s the Best Dog Yeast Infection Treatment?

The best treatment for a yeast infection on a dog depends on the location of the yeast infection.

Ears

Your veterinarian may perform cytology (taking a swab of the discharge and staining it to look at it under the microscope) to diagnose a yeast infection in a dog’s ears.Prescription treatment may include antifungal drops or ointment, an ear cleaner, and in severe or difficult-to-treat cases, an oral antifungal medication.

Skin and Paws

Cytology is also used to diagnose yeast on the skin.Treatments for yeast infections on the skin can include topical antifungal creams, wipes, sprays, and shampoos.Topical ingredients that are effective in treating yeast include chlorhexidine, miconazole, and ketoconazole.In difficult-to-treat or severe cases, oral antifungal medications are used. Oral antifungal medications used in dogs include fluconazole, terbinafine, ketoconazole, and itraconazole. These medications should be used only under the direction of a veterinarian.

Is Your Dog Emitting an Unpleasant Odor?

If your dog is licking his paws, scratching his ears, and smells like a bag of corn chips, a loaf of old sourdough bread from San Francisco, a musty old attic, or something you recognize as budding yeast, he needs your help. Those smells are caused by a type of yeast on your dog‘s skin calledOnce a mild infection starts, though, the yeast releases proteases (enzymes that break down protein) and damages the skin so that even more yeast can thrive. Your dog will be miserable, and they will start chewing on their feet, rubbing on the carpet, and scratching until they are raw and their skin is bleeding.Dogs that have allergies and have been put on antibiotics and immunosuppressants (steroids, cyclosporine, and apoquel) are common victims of yeast infections. Yeast are normal organisms that live on the skin and can overproliferate if conditions allow, especially in those moist areas like the underarms, between the toes, and in the ear canals of the floppy-eared breeds.Here is the best thing you can do to get them back under control while your dog is still at home.

Coconut Oil and Yeast

Since all vinegar is acidic and will kill yeast, you can treat your dog‘s yeast infection with regular white vinegar or apple cider vinegar (ACV). I have used both, but as a control method, I think that the ACV is the best.

Other Natural Cures for a Yeast Infection

Do you know why there are so many treatments for yeast infections? None of them work all of the time. If your dog has a yeast infection on his paws, especially if he is already limping, you might need to try several things until you find something that works.Some holistic practicioners will recommend an immunostimulant. We have several good products here in South America. One of them, pau dárco, is great but the herb available in some pharmacies may not be pure. The same problem exists with a lot of supplies of Cats Claw, another herb from Peru.Other veterinarians recommend yogurt, kefir, tea tree oil, colloidal silver, and oregano oil. Many of these treatments will work the first time. It comes back pretty often.

Preventing the Yeast From Coming Back

Some conventional vets will tell you that a yeast infection is a lifelong problem and will require medicated baths and other treatment for the rest of the dog‘s life. That is correct if the affected areas are not taken care of properly and the dog continues to receive the same food and medical care that led to the Malassezia flare up.To prevent this problem from coming back as soon as it is cleared up, you need to change your dog‘s diet so that he no longer is eating foods that make yeast proliferate. Any dog food with grains, a carbohydrate filler, or high fructose corn syrup should be avoided.

Read More From Pethelpful

Your dog will not need medicated baths once his infection is eliminated, but you can use coconut oil from time to time to control the yeast. If your dog has inhalant allergies and this problem only shows up in the summer, apply coconut oil between the toes and on the inner ear flaps twice a week.

Will I Get Yeast From My Dog?

A dog’s behavior may change with the onset of chronic health issues because they feel so lousy.

Can I Really Treat This at Home?

At times, like when your dog is vomiting blood, has a bad cut, or needs to be spayed, it is a great thing to have a vet that can help. When your dog has a yeast infection, however, it is not an emergency and can be treated at home without going to the vet.

References

Conventional treatment: Etienne Côté DVM, Clinical Veterinary Advisor, Dogs and Cats, 2Toxicity of fungal medications: Stephen Ettinger DVM, Textbook of Veterinary Internal Medicine, 6Allergies: Chiari Noli DVM, Veterinary Allergy, Wiley Blackwell, 2014Secondary Infections: Stephen Barr DVM, Clinical Companion Canine and Feline Infectious Diseases, Blackwell, 2006Holistic Therapies: Richard Pitcairn DVM, Natural Health for Dogs and Cats, 3

Questions & Answers

If you are concerned about your dog, switch it to a real diet.The ACV spray should be applied every day until this condition clears up. You can also apply the coconut oil every day after spraying.You can read about the BARF diet at many sites, or check this link: https://hubpages.com/dogs/paleo-diet-dog.My Pitbull likes to go out and find a nice spot to lie in the sun, even when it is a hot day. Does your bulldog get a chance to bask in the sun? If he just likes to hang around you, consider taking a book or newspaper to the park and sitting outside with him for a half hour each day.Yes, I would stop.In order to reduce it, follow the instructions outlined above.If you are worried about the apple cider vinegar getting into the eyes, you can apply a non-sterile lubricant. Here is an article that has the Amazon link to the lube: https://pethelpful.com/dogs/how-to-use-kool-aid-to…If your dog has a lot of folds that continue to get infected with yeast, you may need to keep them clean and treated with the vinegar several times a week.I usually recommend the family start with once a week. Pick a time when you can be free, make it consistent. Every Saturday afternoon, for example. Change this if it is not enough or if the dog has dry skin from being bathed too often.Coconut oil will help a dog with a yeast infection because the vitamin E and other antioxidants will help protect against damage by free radicals. Free radicals can cause some of the damage to a yeast infected skin, like the wrinkles.Coconut oil also acts as a moisturizer, and allow the skin to heal, aiding in closing the small scratches from the itching associated with yeast infection.By itself, the coconut oil is not adequate. You must first remove the bulk of the yeast with shampooing and then kill the others with apple cider vinegar.The shampoo is safe if you use it as directed.AZO is a homeopathic medicine. It may or may not contain any of the substance that is listed on the package. A homeopathic medicine is made up by using a drop of the drug, mixing it with 100 drops of water, taking one drop of that substance, mixing it with 100 drops of water, etc.If you think about it, you will realize that after several dilutions none of the original substance is even left.Try it once and see how your dog responds. If he is oily/yeasty again in 3 days, treat him again. If he does not have a waxy, smelly secretion from his skin, wait about a week.Not a perfect situation, I understand.ACV may or may not be helpful in the water. There is no proof of this. I prefer to use it topically, as described in the article, and have seen excellent results.If you want to use it in the water also it does not hurt, as long as you do not add too much. (Only add about a teaspoon in a bowl of water. Some dogs do not like the taste, so if your dog will not drink you have to provide another water source. Please do not let your dog become dehydrated.)