This is a question that more than 6926 of our readers have been asking us! Luckily, we have found the most appropriate information for you!

Did you know that some snakes give birth to live young, while others lay eggs? It’s true. And here’s something even more interesting. Certain types of female snakes develop eggs inside of their bodies, but end up giving birth to live young. How is this possible? Read on to find out!

Boa constrictors and green anacondas are two examples of viviparous snakes, meaning they give birth to live young with no eggs involved at any stage of development. Members of the Boidae family, which includes boa constrictors and anacondas, also give birth to live young. Interesting fact : When baby snakes are born live, as is the case with viviparous and ovoviviparous species, they are completely on their own from day one! Most of the sea snake species give birth to live young, which means the babies are born alive in the water. The female members of this particular genus lay eggs on land, as opposed to giving live birth like the other sea snakes.

What kind of snakes lay eggs?

Ball Pythons..Corn Snakes..Kingsnakes..Copperheads.

What snake does not lay eggs?

Boa constrictors and green anacondas are two examples of viviparous snakes, meaning they give birth to live young with no eggs involved at any stage of development.

Do poisonous snakes lay eggs or give live birth?

Among these are the many kinds of king snake and the rat snakes. Of the four venomous snakes native to the United States, only the coral snake is an egg-layer. The other three, rattlesnake, copperhead and water moccasin, are pit vipers — and vipers don’t lay eggs.

How do snakes give birth?

Laying eggs..Live birth..Eggs and live birth.

Snakes may have similar body plans, but they are among the most diverse species on earth. So with nearly 3,000 snake species worldwide, it’s unsurprising to find these reptiles in varying sizes and diets.

While you’ve always known that all reptiles lay eggs, some snakes give birth to live young ones, just like mammals! In this case, the snakes nourish their developing young via a placenta or yolk sac, something that’s unusual among reptiles. Image Credit: Cormac Price, ShutterstockThese snake species are also known as ring-necked spitting cobras. These snakes are native to Asia, Africa, Europe, and Central, North, and South America. Image Credit: Patrick K. Campbell, ShutterstockThe Colubrid family of snakes typically lays eggs. They are viviparous, which means their young meet all requirements for development inside the placenta or the yolk sac. Water snakes live in wet regions like freshwater ponds and swamps, the most likely reason they adapted to this reproduction method. Otherwise, it would have been risky and hard to find a dry and warm place to lay and develop their eggs. These snakes have an interesting reproductive cycle as swarms of males are usually attracted to the same female during the mating season. Mother Garters give birth to between three to eighty baby snakes and usually stays pregnant for two to three months. Image Credit: Luis César Tejo, ShutterstockElapids such as cobras, kraits, coral snakes, and their relatives lay eggs. The former subspecies are native to Amazon and South-eastern Brazil, while the latter lives in South Central America, Venezuela, and Colombia. Image credit: Pixabay Rattlesnakes are ovoviviparous, which means that the mother incubates the eggs inside her body before giving birth to live baby snakes. This suggests that these snakes only developed to give birth to live young to achieve better neonatal survival rates. Predation, cold temperatures, lack of dry and warm land, and scavenging are some of the conditions that caused them to evolve. Oliver (Ollie) Jones – A zoologist and freelance writer living in South Australia with his partner Alex, their dog Pepper, and their cat Steve (who declined to be pictured). Ollie, originally from the USA, holds his master’s degree in wildlife biology and moved to Australia to pursue his career and passion but has found a new love for working online and writing about animals of all types.

Knowing which snakes lay eggs is important for several reasons. You may want to breed your snake, or you may need to identify a snake that has laid eggs near your house.

Continue reading to find out and see a full list of snakes that are egg-layers ( i.e. oviparous ). Many first-time keepers ask, “do snakes lay eggs or have babies live?” The answer is, the majority of snakes lay eggs . Some snakes lay eggs and others give birth to live young. Snakes can only reproduce once they reach sexual maturity. The age a snake reaches sexual maturity can vary depending on nutrition, size, health and species. Once the snake is mature, it is ready to reproduce and lay eggs. Sometimes species take longer to reach sexual maturity if they are abnormally small or malnourished. Studies have shown that some scales appear on male snakes near their anal region at the time sexual maturity starts. An indicator of sexual maturity for females is the presence of a cloacal capsule that can be seen from the ventral surface. A snake is ready to lay her eggs two weeks to a month after copulation and fertilization. Snakes pay less attention to where they lay their eggs when compared with other reptiles. Most of them do not bury their eggs, but some species such as Pine Snakes dig tunnels in sandy areas to hide their clutches. Most species use natural cavities to lay their eggs . Ball Pythons lay one to eleven eggs per clutch. The breeding season for snakes varies between species – similar to their clutch size and reproductive age. The breeding season usually occurs at a time of year where the snake is healthy and active. Environmental factors ( e.g. temperature, sunlight and rainfall ) heavily influence when snakes lay eggs. Snakes want to breed when it is warm enough and when food is readily available. Species that live in naturally tropical regions breed year-round. Species that hibernate in cooler climates breed in the spring so that their eggs hatch in the summer when it is warm. When fertilization occurs the egg’s shell starts to develop in the snake’s uterus. When it is time for a snake to lay her eggs she will display many twitch-like movements and breathe rapidly. Eggs are expelled from the uterus through uterine and cloacal contractions. A snake will lift her tail and lay eggs! Pliable shells are softer and the egg can rapidly gain or lose mass due to the exchange of water with the surrounding environment. The length of time it takes for a snake to hatch from its egg depends on the species. They use this communication method to synchronize their metabolisms and hatching times. This means all of the eggs in a clutch will hatch at approximately the same time ( within two days of each other ). Snakes have an egg tooth that they use to start to poke themselves through the shell and hatch! A snake uses this tooth to rupture the embryonic membranes inside the egg and then the leathery shell. Snakes that lay eggs are called oviparous. The two largest snake families ( i.e. colubrids and elapids ) are mostly oviparous: If a snake does not lay eggs, how does it give birth? These snakes develop inside their mother without a shell and are then delivered live. Animals that are ovoviviparous form eggs in their womb , but babies hatch from these eggs before they are laid – so babies are delivered live. Viviparous snakesOvoviviparous snakesAnacondasBoasGarter SnakesRattlesnakesLive-bearing species evolved from egg-laying snakes over a long period of time. They do not have to nest or find a place to lay their eggs. Snakes in colder environments can keep their young warmer as they develop. The birthing process for snakes that do not lay eggs is similar to those that do. Some people believe that snakes do not come out to breed until after the first thunderstorm of spring . The truth is warmer temperatures and a snakes’ inner clock tell it to come out of hibernation and mate. Another myth is that venomous and nonvenomous snakes can interbreed to create a hybrid. None of these species can breed successfully and create fertile, viable offspring. Finally, some people believe that snakes give birth to their young through their mouths. Snake eggs feel like leather and can either be pliable or rigid. When it is time to hatch, hatchlings will use their egg tooth to break through the shell. If a snake does not lay eggs it is either viviparous or ovoviviparous. Ovoviviparous snakes form shelled eggs with an embryo inside. The world of snake eggs and reproduction is fascinating and the knowledge can be used to breed your own morph!

It’s a long step on the evolutionary ladder from laying eggs to having live babies, and snakes hit several rungs in between. Reproduction and maternal care vary greatly among the snakes that live and breed in the wild in the United States, even among the recent immigrants.

Holding the embryos as they develop to live babies inside her keeps them warm and safe from predators. But it’s hard on Mom because she can’t hunt for food as well, eat as much — her belly’s full of young’uns — or move as fast to avoid becoming victim herself. The eggs eventually hatch inside the mother ,and the babies emerge from her body as live young. Most egg-laying snakes usually find a nice warm, damp, dark spot to “stop and drop,” and then move on, leaving offspring to fend for themselves. The python, including the imported Burmese now living and breeding in Florida, actually incubates her eggs by curling around them and raising her body temperature through muscle contractions. Live-bearing snakes frequently abandon their young soon after birth, but some rattlesnakes are known to hang around for a few days to discourage predators from messing with hatchlings.

Which Snakes Lay Eggs, and Which Give Birth to Live Young?

Did you know that some snakes give birth to live young, while others lay eggs? It’s true. And here’s something even more interesting. Certain types of female snakes develop eggs inside of their bodies, but end up giving birth to live young. How is this possible? Read on to find out!

Which Snakes Give Birth to Live Young?

How do snakes reproduce? It depends on the species. Some species give birth to live young, while others lay eggs. In fact, there are three distinct methods of reproduction, as described below:The reproduction terminology can be confusing. So think of it this way:

How Snakes Reproduce: Oviparous, Viviparus, and Ovoviviparous

There are three distinct methods of a snake’s reproduction method. They all vary depending on the snake species. They include:

1. Oviparous

Most snakes are oviparous, which means that they reproduce by laying eggs. Therefore, the snakes must incubate and keep the eggs warm until the hatchlings emerge from the shell.

2. Viviparous

Viviparous snakes give birth to live young. There are no eggs involved at any stage of development.In this case, the snakes nourish their developing young via a placenta or yolk sac, something that’s unusual among reptiles.

3. Ovoviviparous

You can think of ovoviviparity as a “cross” between an egg-laying snake and one that gives live births. Ovoviviparous snakes develop non-shelled eggs inside their bodies, where the young develop from. But the young ones are usually born alive without the eggs or eggshells because they remain inside the mother.It means that the eggs hatch inside the mother, and the baby snake emerges with no shell. Amazing!

11 Snake Species That Give Live Birth:

1. Sea Snakes

Sea snakes belong to the Elapidae family of snakes alongside snakes like cobras, mambas, and adders, although Elapids generally lay eggs.These snakes live underwater and rarely or never visit the land. Unfortunately, snake eggs won’t incubate and develop underwater, so most sea snakes incubate inside their bodies.The Krait is the only sea snake species that lay eggs. It visits land to mate, digests its food, and lay eggs.

2. Rinkhals

These snake species are also known as ring-necked spitting cobras. Although Rinkhals are related to egg-laying cobras, they are ovoviviparous.They probably developed this reproduction method due to their incredible self-defense mechanism. Predators would have to face mother Rinkhal to get her eggs, and they know better not to.

3. Vipers and Pit Vipers

Most vipers and pit vipers, except a few snakes like the bushmasters, are live-bearers. These snakes are native to Asia, Africa, Europe, and Central, North, and South America.Vipers and pit vipers are all venomous reptiles. They also prefer environments with a cool climate.

4. Water Snakes

The Colubrid family of snakes typically lays eggs. Water snakes, rat snakes, and garter snakes are some of the members of the large colubrid family.Water snakes are among the few members of the colubrid family that give birth to live young. They are viviparous, which means their young meet all requirements for development inside the placenta or the yolk sac.Water snakes live in wet regions like freshwater ponds and swamps, the most likely reason they adapted to this reproduction method.Otherwise, it would have been risky and hard to find a dry and warm place to lay and develop their eggs. In addition, snake eggshells are thin, so it’s easy for them to drown.

5. Garter Snakes

Here are other snake species that give birth to live baby snakes. Garter snakes are ovoviviparous reproducers and a member of the colubrid family.These snakes have an interesting reproductive cycle as swarms of males are usually attracted to the same female during the mating season. This creates a kind of a massive breeding ball, hosting up to 25 males for one female!That’s not all, as the females are capable of storing sperm for years. They release them to fertilize their eggs only if the living conditions become favorable.Mother Garters give birth to between three to eighty baby snakes and usually stays pregnant for two to three months.

6. Boa Constrictors

Boa Constrictors, just like other Boas except for the Calabar Boa snake, are livebearers. Baby snakes develop inside their mother’s body for about four to five months before the mothers give birth to a litter of around 10 to 60 neonates.However, unlike the other Boas who developed this method, possibly due to their predecessor’s living conditions, no one knows why Boa Constrictors are viviparous.

7. Some Elapids

Elapids such as cobras, kraits, coral snakes, and their relatives lay eggs. However, others like Acanthopis, also known as Death adders, give live birth like sea snakes.

8. White-lipped Snakes

White-lipped snakes are sub-species of elapid snakes. They should be reserved for experienced owners because of their temper.These snakes are small in nature and viviparous. White-lipped snakes must have evolved to give birth to live young because of the freezing conditions in which they live.

9. Anacondas

All species of Anaconda, from the yellow Anaconda, green Anaconda, darkly-spotted Anaconda, and the Bolivian Anaconda, reproduce live young ones. Thus, they are viviparous, just like their Boa cousins.Anacondas must have developed this method due to their predecessor’s environment. This birthing method favors these snakes because they are aquatic.Plus, they are fierce, so any predator such as opportunistic birds and critters who feed on anaconda eggs would have to face a pregnant anaconda mother to reach the eggs.

10. Amazon Tree Boa

The two Amazon Tree Boa subspecies, Corralus hortullanus hortullanus, and the Corallus hortulanus cooki give birth to live young that are independent of their mothers.The former subspecies are native to Amazon and South-eastern Brazil, while the latter lives in South Central America, Venezuela, and Colombia.These snakes become sexually mature at around three years old and have a 6-8 month gestational period.

11. Rattlesnake

Rattlesnakes are ovoviviparous, which means that the mother incubates the eggs inside her body before giving birth to live baby snakes.These snakes probably developed this form of reproduction because they are very poisonous and defensive. Therefore, the eggs stay inside her rather than in a nest so that no one messes with them.

Do Snakes Lay Eggs?

Many first-time keepers ask, “do snakes lay eggs or have babies live?”The answer is,Once they find out that snakes do lay eggs, their next question normally is, “do all snakes lay eggs?”The answer in short is no.Most snakes lay eggs, but there are some families of snakes that do not. Some snakes lay eggs and others give birth to live young.

At What Age Do Snakes Lay Eggs?

Snakes can only reproduce once they reach sexual maturity.The age a snake reaches sexual maturity can vary depending on nutrition, size, health and species. Most snakes reach sexual maturityOnce the snake is mature, it is ready to reproduce and lay eggs.Sometimes species take longer to reach sexual maturity if they are abnormally small or malnourished.Studies have shown that some scales appear on male snakes near their anal region at the time sexual maturity starts.An indicator of sexual maturity for females is the presence of a cloacal capsule that can be seen from the ventral surface.

How Many Eggs Do Snakes Lay?

A snake is ready to lay her eggs two weeks to a month after copulation and fertilization.She must then decide where to lay her eggs.Snakes pay less attention to where they lay their eggs when compared with other reptiles. Most of them do not bury their eggs, but some species such as Pine Snakes dig tunnels in sandy areas to hide their clutches.Most species use

When Do Snakes Lay Eggs?

The breeding season for snakes varies between species – similar to their clutch size and reproductive age.In many species that live in the United States their breeding season occursThe breeding season usually occurs at a time of year where the snake is healthy and active.Environmental factors (Species that live in naturally tropical regions breed year-round. Species that hibernate in cooler climates breed in the spring so that their eggs hatch in the summer when it is warm.When fertilization occurs the egg’s shell starts to develop in the snake’s uterus. Her glands secrete fibers that help develop a shell.

How Do Snakes Lay Eggs?

When it is time for a snake to lay her eggs she will display many twitch-like movements and breathe rapidly. She may also flick her tongue.Eggs are expelled from the uterus through uterine and cloacal contractions. A snake willShe will lay all of her eggs in a pile and they stick to each other.Snakes lay either soft eggs (Most species lay soft shelled eggs.Many mothers do not stay with their eggs after oviposition. Only some species curl around their eggs to keep them warm.

Do Snakes Hatch From Eggs?

Yes.Now you know that snakes lay eggs, you may be wondering how snakes hatch from eggs.When neonates are developing they use their heartbeats to communicate with each other. They use this communication method to synchronize their metabolisms and hatching times.This means all of the eggs in a clutch will hatch at approximately the same time (Snakes have an egg tooth that they use to start to poke themselves through the shell and hatch!A snake uses this tooth to rupture the embryonic membranes inside the egg and then the leathery shell.

Which Snakes Lay Eggs?

Snakes that lay eggs are called oviparous.Most snakes develop eggs inside of them and eventually lay those eggs. The eggs will then incubate from atmospheric heat or the mother’s body heat from. She may leave the pile alone or may curl herself around it to keep the clutch warm. The babies hatch sometime later.When a snake lays eggs like this they are known as oviparous.The root “ov” or “ovo” means egg and “parous” means bearing of offspring.The two largest snake families (

Viviparous and Ovoviviparous Snakes

Myths About Snake Birth

There are some popular misconceptions about how snakes are born.Some people believe that snakes do not come out to breed until after the first thunderstorm of spring. This is not true. The truth is warmer temperatures and a snakes’ inner clock tell it to come out of hibernation and mate.Another myth is that venomous and nonvenomous snakes can interbreed to create a hybrid. This is not true. Venomous and nonvenomous snakes are different species. None of these species can breed successfully and create fertile, viable offspring.Finally, some people believe that snakes give birth to their young through their mouths. Again, not true. The truth is that it is very common for larger snakes to eat smaller snakes.

Egg-Layers

Reptiles in general are egg-layers. This is true of snakes. Snake eggs aren’t hard like bird eggs; they’re leathery. A snake egg stretches to contain and protect the baby inside until the yolk is absorbed and the little snake is ready to survive on its own. The United States is home to more than 200 species of snakes, and most of them lay eggs. Among these are the many kinds of king snake and the rat snakes. Of the four venomous snakes native to the United States, only the coral snake is an egg-layer. The other three, rattlesnake, copperhead and water moccasin, are pit vipers — and vipers don’t lay eggs. The largest snake found in the United States, the non-native Burmese python, is an egg-layer.

Live-Bearers

Any snake that pops out live babies instead of eggs can be called live-bearing, but it’s not live birth in a standard sense. In most cases of what appears to be a snake giving live birth, the female snake has actually held her eggs inside her body until they hatched, then pushed the babies out into the cold, cruel world. Holding the embryos as they develop to live babies inside her keeps them warm and safe from predators. But it’s hard on Mom because she can’t hunt for food as well, eat as much — her belly’s full of young’uns — or move as fast to avoid becoming victim herself.

Neither One nor the Other

Any baby grown inside its mother’s body must be nurtured through a direct connection to the mother. In mammals, this connection is the placenta. But in snakes that form eggs but don’t lay them, the connection is made in different ways, including the fetal membrane found inside the thinner shell of the retained eggs. The babies stay in the eggs and live mostly on the egg contents. The eggs eventually hatch inside the mother ,and the babies emerge from her body as live young. This is certainly not egg-laying, but neither is it true live birth — the technical term for it is “ovoviviparous” — and it’s the standard reproductive process in many snakes, from harmless garter snakes to venomous rattlesnakes and water moccasins.