Do Australian Cattle Dogs Shed?

However, most of us can agree that it is well worth the love a dog can bring into your home! Hi dog moms and dads, my name is Bri and my dog Bruce is what I would call a heavy shedder.

After talking with my friend about her pup, I learned that she was completely oblivious to how much this breed sheds. They were essential to farmers to help with migrating herds and keeping the cattle safe.

Australian Cattle Dogs come from a unique mixture of different breeds, including Dalmations, Collies and Dingos. The combination of these breeds created a loyal, hard working and agile dog who was born to herd and defend cattle! Many have seen them herding children and acting as watch dogs that are extremely loyal to their owners.

Australian Cattle Dogs have a double coat that helps to protect them from the weather while they work. The topcoat is smooth to reflect water, and the undercoat is thick to keep them warm. Australian Cattle Dogs coats do not have an oily texture, so they are super easy to groom.

Australian Cattle Dogs are known as frequent shedders (as opposed to moderate and infrequent). This is when the dogs undercoat will shed like crazy, and the dead hair needs to be brushed to get removed. Stage of life doesnt have as much as an impact as the time of year, but its still worth mentioning.

Just like people, diet an exercise can impact the health of a dogs fur and skin!

Why do Australian Cattle Dogs shed a lot?

The real reason why the double-coated Blue Heeler sheds so much is because their coat is always shedding to adjust to the weather. In other words, these “super smart” coats go through major seasonal shedding. Blue Heelers go through excessive shedding at least twice a year.

Why you shouldn't get an Australian Cattle Dog?

Because Australian Cattle Dogs were crossbred, they inherited some potential health problems, particularly deafness. According to the American Kennel Club, breeders should check for progressive retinal atrophy (PRA), which leads to blindness, and hip dysplasia.

Are Australian Cattle Dogs barkers?

Bred to perform demanding tasks, the Australian cattle dog is extremely alert, intelligent, watchful and courageous. … Loyal to their owners and wary of strangers, they are fiercely protective when used as a watch dog, although they are not barkers.

Are Australian Cattle Dogs hypoallergenic?

Australian Cattle Dog / Hypoallergenic

Also known as the blue heeler or Queensland heeler, an Australian Cattle Dog is a visually distinct herding breed with a muscular body and boundless enthusiasm. His bright, alert expressions broadcast his innate intelligence, which can be a point of pride or a source of frustration for his pet parents, depending on how well and frequently hes exercised. As his breed name suggests, this stocky, compact pup was originally bred to help herd cattle in the land down under but has since become a beloved household pet here in the United States.

Not only is this bonding time important for the health and happiness of your dog, it also gives his owner a chance to spot snarls, mats, and tangles before they become unmanageable. Use a slicker-style brush during coat blows, as well as an undercoat rake. These tools will help pull off dead and tangled hair, which avoids the dog depositing it on furniture or carpets later through shedding.

This approach may elicit less alarm than a traditional brush, and it can be used in conjunction with a slow-enjoyment toy such as peanut butter frozen in the hollow core of a rubber ball. Simply commit, along with any household members, to brush and exercise him on a regular basis and the reward will be a happy, clean, low-shedding canine companion.

Australian Cattle Dogs (AKA Blue Heelers) are dogs of medium size that were bred in Australia to herd and drive cattle. They are highly intelligent, energetic and eager workers on the farm, as well as loyal family companions.

And this is normally during seasons like spring and autumn when they blow their coat. The reason for this is because they are naturally preparing themselves for changing weather conditions. For example, during spring they tend to shed their thicker winter coat because they no longer need this in the coming summer months.

For instance, fleas, poor diet, allergies, hormonal imbalances and other types of health issues can cause excessive shedding. They were bred as working dogs for the harsh conditions of Australia, so naturally dont require lots of special attention when it comes to grooming. The outer coat is made up of close lying, straight, hard guard hairs that are roughly one inch in length (except for some areas like the head, legs and feet where it tends to be shorter).

Its not possible to completely stop Blue Heelers from shedding, but you can minimize excessive molting and limit how much fur ends up on your floors, furniture and upholstery. And not just because it removes the dead fur from the source, but also because it helps spread his natural skin oils which is good for his coat. Tip: Avoid bathing your dog too often or with harsh shampoos, as this can cause shedding due to dryness in the skin and hair.

Regardless of how good the dog food you select is, nothing is going to completely eliminate the shedding, but these simple things can make a difference overall.

In a recent survey Do Australian Cattle Dogs Shed? 200 owners said their dogs NEVER STOPPED SHEDDING! They shed a lot more than twice a year. Lets see why:

We hope that, due to our love of the breed and our extensive research, this site will become the ultimate resource for ACD lovers, owners, and future owners. report this ad

Australian Cattle Dog Shedding

Australian Cattle Dogs are a moderate shedding breed.Which means that, most of the time, you’ll notice some fur floating around the home, but not as much as you would with a heavy shedder like the German Shepherd or Labrador for example.However, there are a couple of times each year when you may notice an increase in the shedding. And this is normally during seasons like spring and autumn when they “blow their coat.” The reason for this is because they are naturally preparing themselves for changing weather conditions.For example, during spring they tend to shed their thicker winter coat because they no longer need this in the coming summer months.It does depend on the individual dog and where they are located in the world, among other things, as to how extreme these yearly shedding events will be. But if you do notice an uptick in moulting for about 2-3 weeks come spring and autumn, this is likely the reason why.There are other things that can cause dogs to shed beyond what is considered “normal” though. For instance, fleas, poor diet, allergies, hormonal imbalances and other types of health issues can cause excessive shedding. So if you do have any concerns, contact your local veterinarian.Overall though, you should expect to notice some hair around the home with an ACD. Shedding is a normal and healthy process where they are losing the old fur to make way for the new batch. And getting this under control mostly comes down to proper grooming.

Grooming Your Blue Heeler

Grooming a Blue Heeler isn’t difficult or time consuming.They were bred as working dogs for the harsh conditions of Australia, so naturally don’t require lots of special attention when it comes to grooming.For general coat maintenance, brushing once or twice a week with a slicker brush or bristle brush should do the trick. And since his coat doesn’t tend to have that typical dog odor, only the occasional bath is needed.A slicker brush is a fairly common and inexpensive type of dog brush that is made of fine wire bristles that are slightly angled and have rubber or plastic tips on the end to protect the dog’s coat. And a bristle brush is a simple dog brush with bristles on it that come in either soft, medium or hard.The reason these brushes are ideal has to do with his coat. ACDs have a smooth, double coat that is ideal for the Aussie conditions in which they originate. A double coat means that they have two layers of fur – an outer coat and undercoat.The outer coat is made up of close lying, straight, hard guard hairs that are roughly one inch in length (except for some areas like the head, legs and feet where it tends to be shorter). And the colours of the coat are blue or red that is either mottled or speckled.The undercoat is dense and close lying. And this, along with the rain-resistant outer coat, is what helps to insulate the ACD from harsh weather. Both hot and cold.The fact that they have an undercoat is also why they tend to shed more heavily twice per year, and why it may be worth using a deshedding tool or undercoat rake during these times. Simply because these make removing the old, dead fur from the undercoat a bit easier and may save you some time.

Reducing Excessive Shedding

It’s not possible to completely stop Blue Heelers from shedding, but you can minimize excessive molting and limit how much fur ends up on your floors, furniture and upholstery.The first method is simply to brush him regularly. You don’t want to over brush, to the point of causing skin irritation, but brushing several times a week during times of heavy moulting can make a big difference. And not just because it removes the dead fur from the source, but also because it helps spread his natural skin oils which is good for his coat.The second method of reducing shedding has to do with bathing. ACDs don’t need to be bathed very often, but bathing more often during shedding season can help remove even more old fur from his coat.Once you’ve got the grooming elements dialled in, the next thing to look at is what you’re feeding him, which is something your vet should be able to help you with. Basically, better quality dog foods reduce the chance of your dog shedding due to poor nutrition (a common factor in excessive shedding). And it can help him develop a healthy, moisture rich coat.You don’t need to buy some sort of fancy dog food or supplement to stop shedding. But a healthy, balanced diet, can make a difference. Also, some find that natural supplements such as virgin coconut oil and olive oil are helpful.Regardless of how good the dog food you select is, nothing is going to completely eliminate the shedding, but these simple things can make a difference overall. And if you want to learn about other ways to reduce shedding, check out this guide.

Do Blue Heelers shed a lot?

The Blue Heeler, whos real name is the Australian Cattle Dog, sheds A LOT, Every day of the year!

Australian Cattle Dogs Have a Double Coat

Like many other breeds of dog, the Australian Cattle Dog has a double coat. The double coat provides protection from extreme weather conditions.His double coat consists of an undercoat that is thicker, shorter, and denser. There is also an outer coat that is longer and lays closely over the undercoat.So, when Australian Cattle Dogs shed, it is the undercoat that sheds seasonally, and the outer coat that sheds non stop.Think of the fluffy undercoat as the insulation layer that provides warmth in the winter. The outer coat, or guard hairs, is the

The Life cycle of a Hair Shaft

Every hair shaft grows from a hair follicle and has a specific growth pattern.First is the growth phase.The hair shaft grows from the bottom of the follicle and is pushed upward through the skin, emerges, and extends until its maximum length is reached.The next phase is when the hair shaft reaches its maximum length, stops growing, and starts to detach itself from the bottom of the follicle, allowing that space for new hair growth to begin again.In a resting phase, the hair is no longer attached to the blood supply. It will rest in this state for several months before it falls out, or sheds, allowing the new growth beneath it to emerge.Since all hair grows in this manner, it is easy to see that all animals with hair must shed, and each hair grows and sheds on its own cycle.

Does Diet Affect Shedding?

With the change of seasons from year to year, in addition to the change of temperature, the days become longer and shorter. The hours of daylight become more, then less.The intensity of the sun increases and decreases from summer to winter.These changes in the amount and length of daylight have an effect on the pituitary gland which lies at the base of the brain.(It is not the change of temperature)As the changes in sunlight affect the pituitary gland, it causes an increase or decrease in the production of TIt is the Thyroid gland that directly stimulates the hair follicle to grow and shed hair. The undercoat shows more seasonality than the outer coat.When spring arrives, and the days start to get longer, the winter undercoat starts to shed to make way for the summer coat.In the fall, the shorter days cause the summer coat to shed making way for the denser winter coat. This would explain what some call twice a year “blow.”All this time, the longer outer coat continues its own cycle of growth, rest, and shed.

What About bathing or grooming?

Although brushing will not change the growth cycle, it will help remove some of the already loose hair. Brushing will also stimulate and distribute the oils throughout the hair shaft.Occasional bathing is good not only to keep the hair clean, but the rubbing and scrubbing also help work out some of the already loose hairs.Be careful not to use too strong of a shampoo that might wash the natural oils out of the hair and skin.