Difference Between Male and Female Cats?

It isn’t always easy to tell a male cat from a female cat, and it’s even more difficult to sex a kitten or a neutered male. There are, however, telltale signs and behaviors that can make it easier to determine a cat’s sex. Once a cat or kitten has been successfully sexed, unless the owner is a cat breeder, it’s important to find a good vet who can spay or neuter the pet.

“Whole” cats: Tomcats that have not been neutered have readily evident testicles and a broader jowl. Most neutered male cats will still show the vestigial remnants of a testicle sac, and the anus and penis will still be relatively close together.

Is it better to have a male or female cat?

Males, or toms, can be friendlier than females. … Female cats tend to be more reserved than males but are far less likely to spray. Females tend to howl when they go into heat and can become pregnant before their first year – talk to your vet about getting your female spayed.

Are female or male cats more loving?

However, female cats usually become more loving, and some tend to rub against almost everything while also being very vocal. Although the majority of non-neutered and non-spayed male and female cats have very distinctive behaviors, there is no consensus that all cats of either sex act a certain way.

Are male cats more affectionate than female cats?

Myth: Male cats are more affectionate towards humans and bond really well with their owners. Female cats are aloof and, because of their mothering instincts, prefer other cats to humans. Reality: This usually comes down to your cat’s individual personality.

What's the difference between a male and female cat?

The most obvious physical difference between male and female cats is their genitalia. Neutered males have their testicles removed and spayed females have their uterus removed. … Male cats are typically larger than females, especially if they were not neutered until after sexual maturity.

For new cat parents, there are many choices to make before bringing your new feline friend into your home, one of which is deciding whether to get a male or female cat. Both male and female cats make great companions, but there can be some differences between the two. Many cat parents may develop a preference for one or the other. In this article we will explore the differences between male and female cats to help new cat parents make an informed decision about which one they might prefer.

It is typically recommended that cats be spayed or neutered before they are 5 months of age to prevent problem behaviors . Also, unneutered male cats typically develop big cheeks due to testosterone causing a larger, rounder face than females.

This may result in repeat trips to the veterinarian and the need to feed a special urinary diet to reduce the development of urine crystals. Male cats have also been reported to spend more time roaming the house than females (Bernsterin & Friedmann, 2013). On the other hand, some owners have reported more conflicts between male cats, especially if they were not neutered before sexual maturity and were picked up as outdoor strays.

One of the main behavioral differences between female and male cats is their tendency to urine mark outside of the litter box. Even if you do the introductions correctly, there is no guarantee that your cats will enjoy each others company and become friends rather than just tolerating each other.

The key is to select a cat or kitten that will adapt well to your environment. Take into account whether you are single, have a family with children, a multi-cat household, or a house with both cats and other animals. Cats are well known for having personalities. Aside from temperament, there are also differences in size, body types, and hair lengths that should be factors in your decision. Researching breeds and learning about gender differences can help you make your choice.

If you are adopting a cat from a shelter, ask about temperament and activity level so that you will have a great match for your household. Intact male cats “spray” to mark their territory and howl for females (this is usually not a problem if you get him neutered).

By this time, they will be weaned, will have been taught some useful skills by their mother (not the least of which is how to use the litter box), and have had some good socialization.

Behavior is affected by many factors, both internal and external. And when it comes to cats, much of the way they act is instinctual. However, many cat owners can attest to the fact that the environment plays a huge role in behavioral patterns, too. A properly socialized cat, male or female, will display a friendlier attitude than one that has never been held by a human.

Before neutering, male cats are prone to urinating on furniture, floors, walls and other areas in order to mark their territory. They spend their time seeking out female mates and will aggressively defend their home from other male cats in the neighborhood, particularly those left outside.

Sexing Grown Cats

For those adopting a kitten, chances are the new pet is only a few weeks old. Newborn and tiny kittens are so immature that it’s nearly impossible to tell their sex. Once they’re six or eight weeks old, however, their genitalia becomes more visually obvious. The penis, however, is not normally visible in male cats, and it’s unlikely that the owner will be able to feel or see the scrotum. Thus, apparent lack of a penis or testes is not an indication that a kitten is female.As a rule of thumb, breeders use “punctuation marks” to identify the sex of younger cats or neutered cats. To do this, raise the pet’s tail gently; start by petting gently and try scratching the cat’s lower back as he or she may raise the tail automatically as purring begins.

Which Combination Of Genders Get Along Better?

If you are thinking of having more than one cat, you may have people telling you that certain combinations are better than others. Specifically, there is anecdotal evidence that malefemale combinations are better than malemale or femalefemale. However, a study by Barry and Crowell-Davis (1999) found few differences in positive or negative social behaviors in houses that had only male cats, only female cats, or a combination of male and female cats. Male cats were more likely to spend time in the same room as each other, and female cats were never reported to groom other cats, but no other differences were reportedIf you want to have multiple cats in your household, it is easiest to adopt littermates. Introducing unfamiliar cats is a long, difficult process because cats are territorial. Even if you do the introductions correctly, there is no guarantee that your cats will enjoy each other’s company and become friends rather than just tolerating each other. Adopting littermates ensures that you will have two cats that get along and enjoy each other’s company. Adopting littermates helps contribute to proper socialization as the cats learn proper cat behavior from each other as well. They are also able to entertain and play with each other rather than attacking your feet when they are bored. Even if you do not want kittens, finding older littermates that are up for adoption or looking for ‘bonded buddies’ in the shelter is a better bet than adopting two unfamiliar cats.

The Answer: It Depends

Behavior is affected by many factors, both internal and external. And when it comes to cats, much of the way they act is instinctual. However, many cat owners can attest to the fact that the environment plays a huge role in behavioral patterns, too. A properly socialized cat, male or female, will display a friendlier attitude than one that has never been held by a human.Similarly, a cat that has been raised from kittenhood around other animals is more likely to be comfortable in a large household with dogs and other felines than one that has grown up as a one-owner, child-free kitten. Gender plays little or no role in how an environment might shape a grown cat’s behavior.

Unaltered Male Cats

Before neutering, male cats are prone to urinating on furniture, floors, walls and other areas in order to mark their territory. They spend their time seeking out female mates and will aggressively defend their home from other male cats in the neighborhood, particularly those left outside. For these reasons, it is highly inadvisable to have an unaltered male cat in the home.

Unaltered Female Cats

Unaltered females, when in heat, will prowl relentlessly in search of a mate, but they tend not to show aggressive behavior like their male counterparts. They will, however, yowl and cry incessantly which can be a real pain for those in their vicinity. Caring for them often requires higher vet bills due to the risks and complications they experience while in heat. Of course, there’s also the probability they’ll get pregnant.

After the Neuter/Spay

Some owners and behaviorists argue that there are distinct differences between male and female cats, but only when the cats are intact. Males, for instance, are typically more aggressive and likely to display dominant behavior before being neutered. Females, on the other hand, can display behavior that might seem more nurturing since they spend a large portion of their lives taking care of their young–intact female cats can have up to three litters a year.After the surgery, demonstrable changes can occur. Male cats do develop a more laid-back personality after neutering and are often seen as the more playful and cuddly gender, by some. Females also seem to revert to a more relaxed demeanor, which might not seem as noticeable because they tend not to show much aggression to begin with. However, females are often stereotyped as being more standoffish and having “cattitude.” Much of this likely has more to do with breed than gender, however.