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Baby hares, called leverets, are born looking like miniature version of their parents – fully furred, eyes open, and pretty much ready to begin hopping around. They are able to live on their own only an hour or so after being born and are weaned somewhere within two to three weeks. Baby rabbits, called kits or kittens, conversely, are born hairless, blind, and helpless – and they need the attentions of their mothers for about eight weeks.

Eastern cottontail rabbits, which range from southern Canada down to northern South America, live in dens burrowed by other species, such as woodchucks.

Can hares mate with rabbits?

That means that our domesticated rabbits, if released into the wild, cannot cross breed with wild rabbits or hares, because they are different species and genera, so there is no possibility of mating. They thus cannot disrupt the local ecosystem.

Is a hare just a rabbit?

Hares and rabbits are both in the family Leporidae, but they’re separate species. Both animals have long ears, powerful back legs, and a divided upper lip. But, hares are larger than rabbits. … Hares are precocial, born with their eyes open and fur grown in, which means they don’t require a lot of parental care.

Which is faster a hare or a rabbit?

Hares are faster than rabbits, and have longer, stronger hind legs, allowing them to reach speeds of 37 body lengths per second (National Geographic).

What’s The Difference Between A Bunny, A Rabbit, And A Hare? Let’s start with the two that have scientific names. Hares and rabbits are both in the family Leporidae, but they’re separate species. Both animals have long ears, powerful back legs, and a divided upper lip. But, hares are larger than rabbits. And, instead of creating burrows, hares make nests in the grass. The exposed nesting sites of hares hint at another big difference—when they’re born. Hares are precocial, born with their eyes open and fur grown in, which means they don’t require a lot of parental care. Rabbits, on the other hand, are born naked, blind, and helpless, which is why it’s smart for them to live in more secure dens underground. Where did the word rabbit come from? Until the 18th century, rabbits were called coneys, based on the French conil, shortened from the Latin cuniculus. Rabbit first referred to the young of coneys until eventually the word took over in popularity. Incidentally, that’s also the origin of the name Coney Island (or Rabbit Island), the beachside amusement park in New York. It is one of the only references to coney that’s still used in North America. Where did the word hare come from? The word hare is a very old one in the English language. Developing from the Old English hara, hare is recorded before 900. The deeper roots of hare are Germanic in origin; compare the Danish word hare. Hare is related to the Dutch haas and German Hase. The Old English hasu meaning “gray,” may be connected to hare. Where did the word bunny come from? So, what about bunnies, and specifically the Easter bunny? Bunny was originally (and sometimes still is) used as a term of endearment for a young girl. Over time, it started to mean a young and/or small animal, and now it usually means a rabbit. But, when German immigrants brought the traditions of (Kriss Kringle and) the Easter hare. The night before Easter, children would find a quiet corner in their house and make a nest out of clothing for the Easter hare to come lay eggs (the origin of the Easter basket). The word hare was dropped on its way across the Atlantic and the fuzzier, cuddlier word bunny was applied in its place. Why a hare and not, you know, a chicken to lay those Easter eggs? The intensely short gestation period and well-known reproductive speed of hares and rabbits have a long cultural association with spring and fertility. Hares are usually shy and isolated creatures, but their spring mating ritual makes them most conspicuous to humans in March and April. The phrase “mad as a March hare” hints at that mating season, when hares can be seen boxing each other as part of their unruly courtship ritual. Eggs are also a fertility symbol, and during the Lent fast, Catholics were traditionally not allowed to eat eggs, so they became part of the Easter feast. There’s a lot happening in those relationships, but it seems that the bunny-egg entanglement is here to stay. Don’t Get Mixed Up Again! Get Dictionary.com tips to keep words straight … right in your inbox. 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Believe it or not, rabbits and hares are completely different species, even though they look quite alike and are actually members of the same order of mammals (Lagomorpha). There are significant differences in physical appearance, behavior, and even lifestyles.

Believe it or not, rabbits and hares are completely different species , even though they look quite alike and are actually members of the same order of mammals ( Lagomorpha ). Baby rabbits — called kittens or bunnies — are born hairless and blind , totally dependent on their mothers. Baby hares — called leverets — are born with fur and sight, and they can move on their own within an hour of their birth. Jump online to read through Hare vs. Rabbit to learn more interesting differences between the two species, as well as to see several pictures of the two creatures.

Not so fast. Our Weird Animal Question of the Week comes from Tristan Ishtar, who asked: “What’s the difference between a rabbit and a hare? And is that where ‘hare brained’ came from?”

The short answer: A lot, and yes—the adjective “harebrained” likely refers to hares’ skittish tendencies, especially in captivity. Hares and rabbits are in the same family, Leporidae , but they’re “different species, like sheep and goats are different species,” Steven Lukefahr , a geneticist at Texas A&M University in Kingsville, said via email. Newborn hares, called leverets, are fully developed at birth—furred with open eyes—while newborn rabbits, called kittens or kits, are born undeveloped, with closed eyes, no fur, and an inability to regulate their own temperature, Stott said. That’s why, as a hare that burrows, “Bugs Bunny is a fraud,” Stott joked. As for “harebrained,” which means flighty or foolish, Stott suspects it stems from the animals’ unease in captivity, where they’re prone to spooking at the slightest stimulus (sometimes accidentally causing their own deaths). But if a female isn’t ready to mate with a male who is chasing her, she might stand up and throw a punch right at him—or several. Those speedy reflexes may be great for avoiding predators, but it makes hares a “poor pet,” he said.