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The Coton de Tuléar is the quintessential happy-go-lucky pooch. The Coton (pronounced kah-tone) is a bouncy little companion dog that is primarily valued for its adorable personality and cute, stuffed-animal-like appearance. The breed originated in Madagascar several hundred years ago and is named for a port city there. The Coton de Tuléar is the national dog of the island of Madagascar. It is related to the Bichon Frise and the Maltese, but has its own distinct character.

In the 1970s, the Coton was brought to Europe and to the United States, cultivating a history of living a life of luxury as a companion to the upper classes. In addition to its charming personality, a notable feature is its “cottony” coat and funny “mustache and beard” muzzle. Its coat, which is silky-soft to the touch, makes it a favorite accessory for owners – including certain celebrities – who find keeping this pet close more than they can resist. The Coton de Tuléar breed is all about temperament; they possess an abundance of personality, which is the primary reason for the popularity of this little dog. The Coton will also tilt their furry head in response to being spoken to in a comical jerk that highlights their long mustache and beard. The family, single, or older owner that fully appreciates the affable character of this dog will find their temperament to be simply perfect. Eye and disc problems may be accelerating in frequency due to improper, small gene pool breeding practices. The Coton is exalted as a highly trainable pet and a good fit for owners of all experience levels due, in large measure, to their intelligence and eagerness to please. For families, the Coton may be one of several pets, and one who is easily integrated into “the pack.” This is a low-maintenance dog with just the right amount of childlike energy for a lifetime of playful experiences. An occasional bath, which can be performed in a sink instead of a bathtub or outdoors, is all that’s needed to keep your Coton’s coat clean and healthy. The unproven consensus is that the Coton de Tuléar dog breed was brought to Madagascar during the 16th and 17th centuries aboard pirate ships.

How much do Coton de Tulear puppies cost?

One of the first things you should learn is the Coton de Tulear cost. The cost is going to vary depending on where you get your dog from. However, most Coton de Tulear puppies are around $300. However, if you are looking to get a Coton dog breed from a breeder you can expect to pay between $2,000 to $4,000.

Why you shouldn't get a Coton de Tulear?

This social and affectionate breed can become attached to family members, so there’s the potential for separation anxiety. This intelligent breed is known for performing tricks, like jumping up and walking on hind legs. They learn quickly but can be stubborn, and they may be difficult to house-train.

Is Coton de Tulear a good family dog?

The Coton De Tulear is a happy-go-lucky breed with an infectious personality. They are delightful family pets who get along great with other dogs, cats, and children. … Coton De Tulear’s can be a bit stubborn when it comes to training, but with consistent and positive sessions, your Coton will pick it up in no time.

Do Coton Poos bark a lot?

They are great dogs for first time dog owners. They are alert little watchdogs and will always bark if they see an intruder but are not prone to barking excessively. They are full of energy and will love play sessions which give them both physical and mental stimulation.

The Coton de Tulear is a hardy, sturdy yet small dog. Although bred as a companion, it once survived on its own. Their hallmarks are a bright personality and profuse, white, cottony coat. The approximately 4 inch coat has the texture of soft cotton. It is dense and abundant and stands off the body. It’s believed its texture allows air to circulate within it, insulating the dog from heat and cold. The white coloration is another breed hallmark. However, puppies may be born with spots, mostly around the head and ears, which fade with age.

One of these ships sunk off Tulear, and several little white dogs survived and came ashore. When Madagascar attained independence in the mid 1900s, tourism increased and visitors took Cotons home with them. The Fèdèration Cynologique Internationale (FCI) recognized the Coton in 1987, increasing demand and depleting native stocks. In 1992, Madagascar began limiting the number of exported Cotons. There is some disagreement about the proper type of the breed between the prominent breed clubs, further fueled by disagreement over pursuing AKC recognition. The AKC admitted the Coton de Tulear into the Non-Sporting group in 2014. The Coton is a playful, merry, boisterous companion, eager to entertain and please. The Coton is active indoors and can run off most of his energy with lively games inside or in the yard. Any leaves or twigs in the coat must be removed immediately before they cause a tangle. Major concerns: none Minor concerns: patellar luxation Occasionally seen: CHD Suggested tests: knee, hip Life span: 13–15 years Note: While the characteristics mentioned here may frequently represent this breed, dogs are individuals whose personalities and appearances will vary. Please consult the adoption organization for details on a specific pet.

The Coton de Tulear, “Royal Dog of Madagascar,” is a bright, happy-go-lucky companion dog whose favorite activities include clowning, cavorting, and following their special human around the house. The Coton is small but robustly sturdy.

Coton de Tulear Breed Profile

Overview

Temperament

Adaptability

Health

Owner Experience

Grooming

Activity Level

Size

Life Span

Form and Function

Breed Traits

Energy Level

Exercise Requirements

Playfulness

Affection Level

Friendliness To Dogs

Friendliness To Other Pets

Friendliness To Strangers

Watchfulness

Ease of Training

Grooming Requirements

Heat Sensitivity

Vocality

Breed Attributes

Type

Non-sporting

Weight

8-15 lb

Height

9-11″

Family

Barbichon

Area of Origin

Madagascar

Date of Origin

1500s

History

The Coton de Tulear (pronounced co-TAWN day-too-LEE-are) means Cotton of Tulear in French, with cotton referring to its coat and Tulear coming from the sea port at the tip of the island of Madasgascar. These dogs’ ancestors, which are also ancestors to the Bichon Frise, Maltese, and Bolgnese, were kept as companions on sea trading ships. One of these ships sunk off Tulear, and several little white dogs survived and came ashore. Some became feral and mixed with native dogs. In the 17th century, the native Merina people adopted the dogs and presented them to the Merina nobility. When the French laid claim to Madagascar in the late 17th century, French nobility adopted the dogs and decreed no commoners could own them. They became known as the Royal Dog of Madagascar.When Madagascar attained independence in the mid 1900s, tourism increased and visitors took Cotons home with them. The first Coton came to America in 1974. The Fèdèration Cynologique Internationale (FCI) recognized the Coton in 1987, increasing demand and depleting native stocks. In 1992, Madagascar began limiting the number of exported Cotons. There is some disagreement about the proper type of the breed between the prominent breed clubs, further fueled by disagreement over pursuing AKC recognition. The AKC admitted the Coton de Tulear into the Non-Sporting group in 2014.

Temperament

The Coton is a playful, merry, boisterous companion, eager to entertain and please. He is very affectionate and loves to be loved. He typically gets along with strangers, children, other dogs, and other pets. Many are easily trained. He is calm inside. Although not a big barker, he can still produce an assortment of vocalizations.

Upkeep

The Coton is active indoors and can run off most of his energy with lively games inside or in the yard. However, walks are also necessary for mental stimulation. Although shedding is minimal, coat care is the breed’s biggest challenge because the coat tangles and mats easily. Brush with a pin brush daily. Any leaves or twigs in the coat must be removed immediately before they cause a tangle. Weekly bathing is recommended.

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