Coral Snake vs King Snake?

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“I had heard a saying, a rhyme, designed to aid in the identification of the coral snake and its non-venomous doppelganger, the king or scarlet snake, but I couldn’t remember it. I found it on this website.

While watching a nature program on Central American rain forests, a segment of which was on their coral snake, I sought to learn the rhyme anew. What I didn’t know that I am grateful to now know is that the rhyme only applies to North American coral snakes! Thanks for including that information here!”

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What is the difference between a coral snake and a king snake?

The easiest way to differentiate kingsnakes from coral snakes is by looking at their coloring: coral snakes have yellow and red bands that touch each other, while black bands always separate the yellow and red bands on kingsnakes.

Which snake is poisonous king or coral?

The coral snake is similar in coloration to the milk snake and the scarlet king snake, though only the coral snake is venomous. A picture is a good way to understand how the color pattern on the snake is laid out. The red band is thicker than the yellow band, but the two are touching.

Can a king snake eat a coral snake?

Kingsnakes also eat coralsnakes, but amazingly they are not immune to the venom of Eastern Coralsnakes (Micrurus fulvius)—kingsnakes injected with coralsnake venom die quickly, and kingsnake blood is 0% effective at neutralizing venom proteins from coralsnakes.

Is the coral snake the most venomous snake?

Coral snakes are small, vibrantly colored, highly venomous snakes. They have the second-strongest venom of any snake (the black mamba has the most deadly venom), but they are generally considered less dangerous than rattlesnakes because coral snakes have a less effective poison-delivery system.

I’m pretty proud that I was able to catch Coral Snakes, and my good friend Ben recently caught a rare Scarlet Kingsnake in the wild (snake removal customer call), and that I’ve taken good photographs of both snakes side by side for comparison.

Snake red touches yellow picture –
The North American Coral snake is the animal you need to find a picture of if you want to see the red touches yellow rhyme in action. They like to stay in their dens during the day, and emerge at night and in the morning hours to hunt prey.

This can be dangerous, as people think they were bit by a harmless milk snake because they feel no immediate effects. If yellow touches white on a snake is it poisonous –
Well, it depends on what part of the world you are in. This is the only rhyme that will identify a coral snake, one of the deadly serpents in North America.

It is important to acknowledge that the snake rhyme poem does not apply to all areas of the world.

There are lots of different kinds of snakes with different strengths and weaknesses, but Ive always wondered the difference between a king snake and a coral snake. I wanted to learn more, so I did a little research and heres what I found.

What happens when you come upon a yellow, red, and black snake and want to catch it but are uncertain if it is venomous or not? While this is not always 100 percent accurate it is a good general description that can help you differentiate between the two snakes before you get too close.

While taking a walk through the woods you run into an adorable or scary (depending on your perspective) stripped snake but you dont know if it is venomous or not. Scarlet king snakes and coral snakes are both located in the South Eastern United States specifically in states like Georgia, Florida, and South Carolina. Because of the similarities in these two snakes habitats people struggle to be able to tell the difference between them.

Another reason that these two snakes are hard to differentiate is that they both love to burrow and are exceptionally good at it. Walking down a path in the woods it is very unlikely to see a coral snake or scarlet king snakes slithering around in the trees, although it does happen sometimes, it is way more likely to see one of these little guys hiding in a pile of leaves or poking out of a burrow in the ground. Both of these snake make lizards, frogs, and bird eggs a part of their normal diet.

Because these snakes have so many similarities like colors, pattern, and even habitats it is hard to see or understand how they are different. Scarlet king snakes cannot camouflage and so instead they mimic a dangerous neighbor. Bill Heyborne, a herpetologist and professor of biology at Southern Utah University Although this evolution was supposed to protect scarlet king snakes it sometimes backfires because humans think they are coral snakes and kill them.

Even with this risk though, this intimidation device that is their skin has been helpful for protecting scarlet king snakes. As was stated above these little guys like to look harmful for protection but really their bark truly is stronger than their bite.

The coral snake is one of the most venomous snakes native to the Southeastern United States. The distinctive red, black, and yellow bands help make it easy to spot this snake.

Many poisonous frogs have this coloration, and even mammals like skunks and honey badgers use it to keep predators at bay. There is some debate on whether this mimicry helps kingsnakes since they have a wider range than coral snakes.

Coral snakes have short, rounded snouts that are primarily black in color. Common King SnakeThe quickest way to identify if the snake is venomous is by the order of the colors. If left untreated, the bite of an Eastern coral snake can cause cardiac arrest and muscular paralysis.

Coral snakes also have fixed fangs and a weak venom delivery system. Symptoms include muscle weakness, drooping eyes, slurred speech, nausea, and vomiting. The first is the Eastern coral snake ( Micrurus fulvius ) found in Florida and the southeastern US.

The Arizona or Sonoran coral snake ( Micruroides euryxanthus ) is found in the southeastern US and Sonora, Mexico. If one has entered an area it shouldnt be, contact a local agency for safe snake removal.

Alternate rhymes:

While taking a walk through the woods you run into an adorable or scary (depending on your perspective) stripped snake but you don’t know if it is venomous or not.Well have no fear because there is a nifty rhyme that helps people remember how to tell if the snake they are looking at is a coral snake.This little rhyme was invented to help recognize coral snakes but also how to tell the difference between coral snakes and scarlet king snakes.There are a couple of variations on this rhyme that some find easier to remember though if you struggle to remember the original.

Can King Snakes be Harmful to Humans?

Scarlet king snakes and really all king snakes in general are not harmful to human. They are normal very docile snakes and often make for fantastic pets.If a scarlet king snake were ever to bite a human it would maybe draw blood but would hurt more than a cat scratch would hurt. As was stated above these little guys like to look harmful for protection but really their “bark” truly is stronger than their bite.If you happen to be a snake or want to own two snakes scarlet king snake and all king snakes in general should not be paired together in the same terrarium.King snakes will eat their cage mates and will become very vicious if their home is occupied be another snake. This is even true when trying to mate king snakes, so be very careful.

Why Do They Look So Similar?

The appearance of the coral snake is an example of aposematic coloration. Many animals use bright colors to warn potential predators that they won’t make a good meal.The most common colors for this are red, black, yellow, and white. Many animals use these colors to indicate that they are toxic or otherwise dangerous. Many poisonous frogs have this coloration, and even mammals like skunks and honey badgers use it to keep predators at bay.Scarlet kingsnakes and the similarly colored scarlet snake can be found in much of the same territory as the coral snake. Both of these snakes exhibit similar coloring.This makes them an example of Batesian mimicry. Batesian mimicry is well-known in butterflies and other insects. It is when a harmless species mimics a more dangerous one to help deter predators.Many predators instinctively avoid red and yellow bands in snakes in areas where coral snakes are common. There is some debate on whether this mimicry helps kingsnakes since they have a wider range than coral snakes.This paper goes over the topic and comes to interesting conclusions on how it has evolved in snakes.

Similarities Between Coral and Kingsnakes

In areas where the two snakes are found, it can be hard to tell them apart. They have similar diets and habits. For instance, both snakes eat lizards, amphibians, bird eggs, and even other snakes.They are both diurnal and prefer hiding under leaf litter or logs.They can be found in burrows or under rocks. Both snakes are also shy, and typically avoid humans if possible. In the Southeastern United States, they also share a coloration of red, black, and yellow in bands of color. Because of this, the two snakes are frequently confused.

Differences Between Them

One difference to note is in behavior. A coral snake will rarely leave the ground. A scarlet kingsnake is an accomplished climber. They can frequently be spotted climbing trees and bushes looking for bird nests. There is also a difference in defensive behavior. If you startle a kingsnake, it will likely rattle its tail to try to scare you off.A coral snake will wiggle both its head and tail side to side. This is a behavior meant to confuse predators as to which end is the head. If a kingsnake bites, it tends to release quickly. A coral snake will chew on you so it can inject its venom. The size is a big indicator as well. A scarlet kingsnake is tiny at less than 2 feet compared to the 4-5 feet a coral snake will reach.The snout of the snakes and their heads are different. Coral snakes have short, rounded snouts that are primarily black in color. Kingsnakes have longer snouts and may have red or yellow on their head.The quickest way to identify if the snake is venomous is by the order of the colors. Please note, this is only for North American species. Many other areas have different colors and patterns on coral snakes.For kingsnakes, their yellow bands will be touching black. For coral snakes, the yellow will touch red. This is noted with many rhymes meant to teach people how to tell the snakes apart. One instance is “red touches yellow, kills a fellow; yellow touches black, venom lack”. You may have heard other variations with similar advice. This is a good way to remember if you are dealing with a coral snake or a harmless kingsnake. Just be sure not to try to handle a wild snake, and keep your distance. Even if they can’t kill you, kingsnakes can still bite.

How Dangerous Are Coral Snakes?

Coral snakes are considered one of the most venomous snakes in the world. If left untreated, the bite of an Eastern coral snake can cause cardiac arrest and muscular paralysis. Symptoms can be delayed in humans, but it will be dangerous if left alone.However, coral snake bites account for about 2% of all snake bites.This is partly because of their shy behavior. Coral snakes also have fixed fangs and a weak venom delivery system. They need to chew through a human’s skin to deliver venom.Because of this, many bitten humans can knock the snake off before they get a dose of venom. You should still seek treatment since symptoms can take up to 13 hours to appear.You won’t experience any intense pain or swelling even if you have been envenomated. Symptoms include muscle weakness, drooping eyes, slurred speech, nausea, and vomiting.While there have been no recorded deaths since the development of antivenin, it is possible. If you or a pet have been bitten, seek help immediately.

Are There Other Species of Coral Snake?

There are three species of coral snake native to the United States. The first is the Eastern coral snake (The Arizona or Sonoran coral snake (

Other Coral Snake Mimics

In the United Snakes, a few other snakes mimic the look of a coral snake. Some are even found in areas where the coral snake isn’t found or has gone extinct.The scarlet snake and the Pueblan milk snake both resemble coral snakes found in their areas. The Sonoran Mountain kingsnake and the Western shovel-nosed snake both mimic the Sonoran coral snake native to the same area. Remember, knowing the region can help you identify what snake you are looking at.