Chicken With Feathers on Legs?

From India, the domesticated chicken spread to the world by the 5th century BC. Today there are hundreds of chicken breeds, but just a flew of them are breeds of chickens with feathered legs, also known as chickens with boots. Lets take a closer look at these extraordinary beautiful chickens with feathers on their legs.

The Belgian Bearded dUccle is a chicken with feathered legs developed in the begging of the last century in Belgium. They make great show chickens , and as a true bantams it is worth noting that they do not have their large versions.

This chicken breed with feathered legs and vulture hocks comes in seven color varieties: black , golden neck, mille fleur, mottled, porcelain, self blue, and white. The Booted Bantam comes in several color varieties, and it has a single comb , and has fully feathered legs with vulture hocks. The hens lay a small white-shell egg and readily brood.

What we do know, however, is that the purpose of breeding the Brahma chicken was to create a bird that was able to produce a lot of meat, while at the same time requiring very little in the way of maintenance. The Cochin chicken breed comes in several color varieties , the following are only the recognized varieties by APA: Barred, Birchen, Black, Blue, Brown Red, Buff, Columbian, Golden Laced, Mottled , Partridge, Red, Silver Laced and White. One thing that is worth noting about this feather legged chicken breed is that it has great personality and extremely gentle temperament.

This feather legged chicken breed was developed back in the 19th century in France. The Faverolles chickens can be large or bantam and are kept as a dual purpose breed. It is worth noting that in Europe and Australia this is a recognized feather legged chicken breed, however in US the Fizzle is any breed of chicken with frizzled feathers, such as Polish Fizzle.

There are several recognized color varieties such as black, blue, buff, white, Columbian, red. They are relatively small breed, since even the standard male weighs around 6 lb. The feathered leg breed of chicken has a lot to offer, from their elegant beauty to their egglaying abilities.

If you want to see more chickens like this one at your farm or backyard coop, look for some feathered-legged chicks today!

What kind of chicken has feathers on their legs?

Brahma. The Brahma chicken breed is believed to have been developed in the United States from fowls that originated in China and India. These are larger birds that lay medium to large-sized eggs and come in three color varieties – light, dark, and buff. Their feathers also cover their legs and toes.

What is the name of chickens with feathers on feet?

Cochin Chickens. If you’re looking for big chickens with feathered feet, you are in the right place. Cochin chickens from China come in nine different colors and are large in stature. That means big eggs and lots of beautiful feathers. With their large size, many people figure Cochin chickens will be aggressive.

What chickens have fur on their feet?

My absolute favorite chicken breeds with feathered feet are brahmas, cochins, and faverolles. I will always have these three in my flock. My current rooster is a very handsome buff brahma, and all of his babies are born with feathered feet too, so now my flock of barnyard mixes all have beautiful feathered feet!

Why do some chickens have feathers on their legs?

You’d think the feathered legs would provide more warmth in a cold season, rather than be a cause for concern! Especially with bantam feathered leg breeds—since bantams can have more difficulty with cold—you’d think that leg feathers would help. And that’s partly true. They do offer some extra protective insulation.

Most chickens have feathers. Some have more feathers than others, and some have excess feathers all over their legs and feet. Did you know that the domestic chicken that we have today goes as far back as 2,000 B.C.? It is descended from the Red Junglefowl found in Southeast Asia and some parts of South Asia.

The Booted Bantam also comes in about 20 color varieties (including the Mille Fleur) and have heavily feathered legs and feet. Image Credit: Emma_Ted, PixabayThe Brahma chicken breed is believed to have been developed in the United States from fowls that originated in China and India.

These are larger birds that lay medium to large-sized eggs and come in three color varieties light, dark, and buff. Image Credit: PixabayThe Cochin hails from China and is a large chicken with a ton of feathers that comes in about nine color varieties. These are also large birds that tend to be tall, but they have less feathering on their legs and feet than many of the chickens on this list.

Image Credit: PixabayAnother chicken that hails from China, but specifically Peking (known as Beijing today), during the Qing Dynasty, these are small birds that are feathered from head to toe. Image Credit: PixabayAnother breed of chicken that originated in China sometime before the 13th century, these birds were named after their silky feathers. They are very sweet, friendly, and docile chickens that are primarily ornamental birds that make lovely and eye-catching pets.

Sultans are small and docile chickens that do not fend for themselves very well (they are prone to bullying, being pecked by other breeds, and easily fall victim to predators). If the coop is muddy, your poor chicken will pick up the mud (and poop with it) and drag it into the nest and on the eggs if shes broody. Frostbite: While the feathers can provide extra warmth in the colder seasons, they can also cause problems if it gets slushy.

Feather footed chickens are a great addition to your flock if youre looking for something new. You can find chickens with fully feathered legs and breeds with giant bell bottoms.

All those lovely feathers carry mud from the ground, into the nest box and onto the eggs. I dont wash fresh eggs unless absolutely necessary, the really gross ones go into a carton for my dog and the rest get wiped off before use.

Obviously, you dont need feathered feet to track mud onto eggs but its definitely a much bigger issue with the feather-legged chickens. Assuming you cant avoid the mud and you need to let your birds outside there are a few things you can do to keep the mess down. Try to keep the coop floor covered in a thick layer of bedding; wood shavings, straw or dried leaves work well.

I soaked his feet in warm Epsom salt water and rubbed away the casings that grew over the feathers. All three of these breeds are homebodies, they enjoy ranging but tend to stick close to home (unlike the ducks that spend more time with my neighbors than with me) and dont take off when the camera comes out. Once you add a mountain of fluffy feathers to that youve got quite a large bird on your hands.

Youre looking at a longer turn around time than with a cornish cross but youll still end up with a decent sized bird on the table. They have a small pea comb making them a great option for raising chickens in a cold winter climate . Even better they have a reputation for laying the majority of their eggs in the colder winter months when everyone else is resting after the fall molt .

One thing to keep in mind when adding giant birds to your flock is the need for lower roosts. Ive never raised them, my love for Brahmas is directly linked to their size and I try to keep my bantam numbers low or I end up with dozens of tiny eggs that no one but my 3 year old wants haha. Out of my original flock I had two Brahma hens make to old age, one died at 9 and the other made it almost to 11.

Theyre actually pretty similar to the Brahmas; they also come in both standard and bantam sizes and theyre in the Asiatic class (originated in Asia). Cochins have a single comb, making them less than my personal ideal for the New York winters. They have several unique features that make them stand out against any other chicken, as a result Silkies are the easiest chicks to identify in a crowd.

Even though they have literal free range of the place the Silkies stay closest to home, I rarely even see them in front of the house. The best way to prevent head injuries is to brood Silkies separately from other birds, especially larger ones.

When selecting chickens for your homestead, you may have certain characteristics youre looking for. For some feathery fun, heres a list of seven chicken breeds with feathered feet.

Originally from China, this small tailed, large, fully feathered breed took America and England by storm in the 1850s. A capon (a male castrated chicken, fattened for eating) at 15-16 months old reached 12 lbs!

Also like the cochins, brahmas have an impressive carcass weight, are good egg-layers and produce eggs well into Winter. Like the cochins, they will not fly over a low fence, have calm and docile personalities and thrive in cold, Northern climates. We chose a brahma as homestead chicken sire due to his size the roosters he fathers are destined for the stock pot, and his hens all have docile personalities and lay large eggs.

Originating in the town of Uccle in Belgium, these lovely chicken breed with feathered feet come in many different shapes, sizes and colors. One of the varieties of Belgian dUccles is the Millie Fleur (meaning 1000 flowers), which has an almost polka-dotted feather pattern. Silkies are named so because their feathers tend to be smaller, and silkier, but fluffier if that makes any sense.

The earliest documentation of a furry chicken comes from Marco Polos travels through Asia in the 13th century. In 1598, Ulisse Aldrovandi, a naturalist in Italy, wrote about wool-bearing chicken and clothed with hair like that of a black cat. While the breed was officially recognized in 1874, sideshows and breeders would spread the myths that they were actually the offspring of chickens and rabbits, or that they had mammalian fur.

Due to their size, the fact that they waddle more than run, and their fluffy plumage blocking their eyesight, you should not allow silkies to free-range theyre too easy a target. While they are not great layers, and dont make an attractive table bird, they are beautiful and people pay a pretty penny for silkies. They have large, upright tails, a single comb with five points, downward-pointing wings, and come in more than 20 color varieties.

Developed from cochins, hudans and dorkings, faverolles have the size we look for in meat birds, while also being respectable layers. They were more fond of grains and insects than grass and vegetables and almost constantly sang that contented chicken song.

Belgian d’Uccle

There areNow, let’s take a closer look at each of these stunning chickens with feathered legs separately.

Booted Bantam

This bantam breed of chicken with feathers on their legs was developed in the Netherlands from bantams originating in Asia.The average weigh of males usually is around 850 grams (30 ounces) and females 750 grams (27 ounces). However the US standards dictate a smaller ideal size of 740 grams (26 ounces) for roosters, and 625 (22 ounces) for hens.The Booted Bantam comes in several color varieties, and it has a single comb, and has fully feathered legs with vulture hocks. The hens lay a small white-shell egg and readily brood.

Brahma

Brahma is probably one of the most famous chicken with feathers on their legs. While the chicken is not farmed as heavily nowadays, mostly because there are other breeds that are a lot more productive, it is still a breed that exists.What we do know, however, is that the purpose of breeding the Brahma chicken was to create a bird that was able to produce a lot of meat, while at the same time requiring very little in the way of maintenance.Read more about this chickens with feathered legs: Brahma chickens.

Cochin

This feather legged chicken breed originated in China, to be used as a meat chicken breed with ornamental purpose. They come as both standard and bantam.Cochin chicken breed comes in several color varieties , the following are only the recognized varieties by APA: Barred, Birchen, Black, Blue, Brown Red, Buff, Columbian, Golden Laced, Mottled , Partridge, Red, Silver Laced and White.One thing that is worth noting about this feather legged chicken breed is that it has great personality and extremely gentle temperament. It is one of the friendliest chicken breeds.Its large variety is actually one of the largest chicken breeds in the world.

Frizzle

The Fizzle is a chicken with frizzled feathers. It is worth noting that in Europe and Australia this is a recognized feather legged chicken breed, however in US the Fizzle is any breed of chicken with frizzled feathers, such as Polish Fizzle.The Frizzle has a single comb type and is clean-legged–without feathers on the shanks. There are several recognized color varieties such as black, blue, buff, white, Columbian, red.

Silkie

The Silkie is very old breed of chickens with feathers on their legs. No one actually knows their origin but it is accepted that most likely it originated from China.Their name ‘Silkie’ comes from their feathers which feel like silk and satin.The Silkie comes in both sizes, standard and bantam. Even the standard one is relatively small chicken, males weigh around 2-3 lbs while the female around 1.5-2 lbs.

Belgian D’Uccles

These chickens are also known as the Barbu D’Uccles and are from Belgium. They come in as many as 20 different color varieties in their native country but are commonly Mille Fleur (which translates to “million flowers” as they are speckled and orange in color). They have feathered legs and four toes, with only the outer toe that is feathered.They are considered an ornamental chicken as they are small in size, gorgeous, and their eggs are quite small. The Belgian D’Uccles is a very talkative and affectionate bird with a calm nature and will love to perch on your lap or shoulder.

Booted Bantam

The Booted Bantam is also called the Sablepoot, or the Dutch Booted Bantam, as they are indeed Dutch. The Booted Bantam is actually very similar to the Belgian D’Uccles in appearance but are generally a little bigger and don’t have a “beard” of feathers like the D’Uccle. The Booted Bantam also comes in about 20 color varieties (including the Mille Fleur) and have heavily feathered legs and feet.These birds are sometimes referred to as the supermodel breed and are only used for exhibiting due to their small eggs and size. The Booted Bantam is a friendly, calm, and easygoing chicken that can make an excellent pet.

Brahma

The Brahma chicken breed is believed to have been developed in the United States from fowls that originated in China and India. These are larger birds that lay medium to large-sized eggs and come in three color varieties – light, dark, and buff. Their feathers also cover their legs and toes.These are one of the largest breeds of chicken and are used for both meat as well as their eggs. Brahmas are very docile and calm chickens that actually do best in northern climates as they are able to handle the cold much better than other breeds.

Cochin

The Cochin hails from China and is a large chicken with a ton of feathers that comes in about nine color varieties. They lay eggs that are large in size and are feathered from head to toe.These birds may be large but are very gentle and friendly – the males are rarely aggressive and can be tamed quite easily. They also do quite well in colder climates and would just as easily make themselves at home in the yard or in your home.

Croad Langshan

A unique name for a unique bird. The Croad Langshan originated in the Langshan district of China but was imported into the U.K. in 1872 by Major Croad for a poultry show. They can be white but are mostly seen in black with a gorgeous iridescent sheen of green. These are also large birds that tend to be tall, but they have less feathering on their legs and feet than many of the chickens on this list.They lay large eggs that are usually various shades of brown but have occasionally been known to lay eggs that are plum in color. The Croad Langshan is a calm and gentle bird that can make a great pet.

Faverolles

This breed of chicken hails from the small village of Faverolles in France in the 1860s. Today, these chickens are rare and large in size and lay medium-sized eggs. They come in white, mahogany, and salmon colors and sport beards and muffs (shorter feathers on the cheeks and chin) as well as five feathered toes.Faverolles are also quite calm and docile birds that can be rather shy and do well in colder weather. They are also curious birds that enjoy a nice cuddle, but they have been listed as ‘threatened’ by the Livestock Conservancy.

French Marans

The Marans (pronounced ‘muh-ran’) chickens originated in Marans, France, in the late 1800s. They come in a large variety of colors but are commonly seen in black copper and cuckoo (which is similar to barred coloration). The French Marans are the only breed that has feathered feet and legs (English Marans do not have feathers on their legs and feet).The Marans are famous for laying very dark brown eggs, and they have a variety of temperaments. Some might be very friendly and docile, while others could be skittish and nervous. In general, they are friendly and might follow you around, but they tend to not want to be touched or handled.

Pekin

Another chicken that hails from China, but specifically Peking (known as Beijing today), during the Qing Dynasty, these are small birds that are feathered from head to toe. They come in about 12 varieties of color, and they lay small eggs.The Pekin is a very gentle and docile bird and can make wonderful pets for the family, but Pekin Bantam cocks might become more aggressive as they mature due to their protective natures. However, if you’re looking for a hen to hug, then the Pekin is an adorable, pint-sized chicken just right for you.

Silkie

Another breed of chicken that originated in China sometime before the 13th century, these birds were named after their silky feathers. These beautiful little birds may have been written about by Marco Polo, who wrote in 1298, they “have hair like cats, are black, and lay the best of eggs.” They come in lots of colors but are commonly seen in white and have five feathered toes and black or dark blue skin.Silkies aren’t good egg layers but are great at hatching eggs from other birds. They are very sweet, friendly, and docile chickens that are primarily ornamental birds that make lovely and eye-catching pets.

Sultan

Lastly, we have the Sultan chicken, which comes from Turkey (where it’s called Serai Taook, which loosely translates to ‘Sultan’s Fowl’) and was essentially a living ornament in the gardens of Sultans. They come in several colors but are usually white and have muffs and beards and large crests of feathers on their heads. Their five toes and legs are also feathered.Sultans are small and docile chickens that do not fend for themselves very well (they are prone to bullying, being pecked by other breeds, and easily fall victim to predators). They are loving and sweet birds but will need some TLC as they don’t do well in cold or wet weather.

Fighting with Mud

The biggest issue is with mud. I free range my birds and living in the North East we get lots of it. There are actually very few months where there isn’t at least a little mud.The problem with mud and chickens with feathers on their feet shows up in the nest box. All those lovely feathers carry mud from the ground, into the nest box and onto the eggs.I don’t wash fresh eggs unless absolutely necessary, the really gross ones go into a carton for my dog and the rest get wiped off before use.Obviously, you don’t need feathered feet to track mud onto eggs but it’s definitely a much bigger issue with the feather-legged chickens.Read more about

Keeping Eggs Clean During the Mud Season

Assuming you can’t avoid the mud and you need to let your birds outside there are a few things you can do to keep the mess down.

Extra Bedding

Try to keep the coop floor covered in a thick layer of bedding; wood shavings, straw or dried leaves work well. It’ll help get the mud off their feet as they walk in to the coop.

Longer Distance to the Nest Boxes

It also helps if they need to take a longer walk from the door of the coop to the nest boxes, depending on the layout and size of your coop that may not be possible.The further they have to walk through the bedding, the more time it has to soak up some of the mud and wetness.

Keep them Inside Longer

Most chickens lay early in the day and if they lay their eggs before they get a change to get muddy your eggs will stay cleaner.

Foot Feather Problems

Chickens can get ingrown feathers anywhere, I’ve had a few hens get them on their backs. I think they were caused by roosters being roosters when the ladies were molting.But by far the most cases of ingrown feathers have been on my birds feathered feet.In the picture above you can see the red and irritated patches on the outsides of the feet where the feathers should be.This guy was my favorite rooster, his name was Bruce. I soaked his feet in warm Epsom salt water and rubbed away the casings that grew over the feathers.The feathers were small and curled into balls, most of them fell out when I rubbed off the covering but a few I pulled out. I was afraid they would end up bleeding and cause more issues if I left them in.Read more about Blood Feathers & What to do if they BreakHe had a lot of foot problems in his old age, I think it was gout which causes swelling in the feet. Gout can be caused by too much calcium and a large breed rooster eating layer is a good way to get too much calcium.

Types of Feather Footed Chickens

When it comes to feather footed chickens you have quite a few options. Today I’m going to share three of my favorite chicken breeds.They’re all birds that I have in my current flock and the cover the whole size spectrum so there is something for everyone!It’s worth noting that the majority of my random barnyard chicken photos feature these three breeds, even though I have more than a dozen types of chickens at this point.All three of these breeds are homebodies, they enjoy ranging but tend to stick close to home (unlike the ducks that spend more time with my neighbors than with me) and don’t take off when the camera comes out.

Brahma Chickens

We’re going to start with my favorite chickens, many years ago I asked a bunch of my favorite homestead bloggers about their favorite chicken breeds, even then I had my Brahmas at number one.Brahmas are everything I look for in a chicken; giant, fluffy, calm, hardy, and friendly.They’re some of the biggest chickens you’ll come across, full-grown roosters weigh in at 12 pounds and hens at 9.5 pounds. Once you add a mountain of fluffy feathers to that you’ve got quite a large bird on your hands.Thanks to that large size they’re also useful as a meat bird. You’re looking at a longer turn around time than with a cornish cross but you’ll still end up with a decent sized bird on the table.Brahmas are known for their docile personalities, going broody and laying 150+ medium-large brown eggs each year. They have a small pea comb making them a great option for raising chickens in a cold winter climate.Even better they have a reputation for laying the majority of their eggs in the colder winter months when everyone else is resting after the fall molt. I have a variety of egg layers but I do notice a shift from a lot of blue eggs to a majority of brown eggs in the winter when the Easter Eggers take a break.One thing to keep in mind when adding giant birds to your flock is the need for lower roosts. I have two sets of roosts, one is about 6.5 feet off the ground and the other is the DIY folding roosts I made with my daughter.The chickens self-segregate with the lighter-bodied birds like the EEs & my Appenzellar Spitzhaubens hanging out up top and the larger birds, Brahmas & Cochins, preferring the lower roosts.They come in three color variations, the most common is the Light Brahma, which is what I have. It’s harder to track down and you’ll pay more but you can order Buff and Dark Brahmas from online hatcheries.You can also find bantam Buff Brahmas. I’ve never raised them, my love for Brahmas is directly linked to their size and I try to keep my bantam numbers low or I end up with dozens of tiny eggs that no one but my 3 year old wants haha.Out of my original flock I had two Brahma hens make to old age, one died at 9 and the other made it almost to 11. The Livestock Conservancy isn’t kidding when they call these birds hardy!

Cochin Chickens

The next magically fluffy bird on our list is the Cochin. They’re actually pretty similar to the Brahmas; they also come in both standard and bantam sizes and they’re in the Asiatic class (originated in Asia).They also lay medium-large brown eggs and can be used as a dual-purpose breed for both eggs and meat. Cochins are known for a docile temperament and going broody.That big guy is “Super Fluffy” and he’s a real sweetheart. When we were overrun with roosters earlier this year the younger ones kept him out of the barn.Finding Super Fluffy became a nightly ritual and he became quite fond of eating out of my hand.They’re large birds but not quite as weighty as the Brahmas. The roosters and hens are about a pound lighter at 11 and 8.5 pounds.Even with all that in common, it’s quite easy to tell them apart at a glance. Brahmas have feathered feet, which gives them a bell-bottom silhouette.Cochins have fully feathered legs and that makes them look like a ball. A round, fluffy chicken ball.They come in a dizzying variety of colors, with over 15 recognized color patterns in both the standard and bantam sizes. Right now I have splash Cochin hens, a splash rooster and gold-laced Cochin hens that I call my Halloween chickens.Cochins have a single comb, making them less than my personal ideal for the New York winters. You don’t get the frostbite issues with smaller comb birds.Learn more about

Chicken Breeds with Feathered Feet

When selecting chickens for your homestead, you may have certain characteristics you’re looking for. For some feathery fun, here’s a list of seven chicken breeds with feathered feet.Originally bred in colder climates, the feathers were thought to keep their feet warmerHowever, one of the downsides of having chicken breeds with feathered feet is that the snow can actually get caught up around the feathers and form little clingy snow-balls.Another issue is that the feathered feet often get muddy and can leave your eggs muddy too.My absolute favorite chicken breeds with feathered feet are brahmas, cochins, and faverolles. I will always have these three in my flock.My current rooster is a very handsome buff brahma, and all of his babies are born with feathered feet too, so now my flock of barnyard mixes all have beautiful feathered feet!

Cochins

We got our cochins as rescues, but they’re one of my favorites. They’re large, hardy, smart, and go broody every Spring and Summer.This makes hatching out new babies every year a breeze! We simply throw a few eggs under a broody hen and let her do her job.We have three cochins, and they’re all such great mamas, they share parenting duty.I’ve even heard rumors that some cochin roosters will go broody!Once endangered, cochins are considered a “recovering breed” by the livestock conservancy.Originally from China, this small tailed, large, fully feathered breed took America and England by storm in the 1850’s.The Chinese bred these birds for their large size for meat, as well as eggs. A capon (a male castrated chicken, fattened for eating) at 15-16 months old reached 12 lbs!While popular for backyard chicken owners, they never caught on for commercial operations. In 1895, Stephen Beale even called them the “least profitable of all of our breeds of poultry.”While their size makes for a good chicken dinner, the produce eggs well into the Winter, and their broodiness makes hatching babies a breeze, they also are not very fast, will not wander far, and cannot fly as well as other breeds, meaning they’ll stay out of your garden if you have a fence.

Brahma

Brahma’s also appeared on the scene out of China shortly after the Cochins around the 1850s. Larger than cochins, they were once reported to be the largest chickens on Earth.While not coming out of China as an official breed, cochins and other large fowl such as Chittigong from India and others were used to develop the breed in America.Their large size and gentle natures lend them to also be called “gentle giants”.I’m sure you’ve seen this video floating around Facebook of a shockingly huge Brahma rooster.Also like the cochins, brahmas have an impressive carcass weight, are good egg-layers and produce eggs well into Winter.In fact, they produce the bulk of their eggs from October to May. Possibly because their extra feathering may make them hotter in the Summer.From the mid-1850’s through about 1930, they were the leading breed of meat birds. They were often harvested at 8-10 weeks of age (much sooner than other breeds – increasing their profitability). And their roosters still made a tasty broiler as late as 12-13 months.Like the cochins, they will not fly over a low fence, have calm and docile personalities and thrive in cold, Northern climates.We chose a brahma as homestead chicken sire due to his size – the roosters he fathers are destined for the stock pot, and his hens all have docile personalities and lay large eggs.

Belgain d’Uccle

Originating in the town of Uccle in Belgium, these lovely chicken breed with feathered feet come in many different shapes, sizes and colors.Michel Van Gelder developed this breed in the late 1800s for exhibition.They have a sweet and docile personality, better suited to pets instead of livestock.One of the varieties of Belgian d’Uccles is the Millie Fleur (meaning 1000 flowers), which has an almost polka-dotted feather pattern. The Mille Fleur was accepted into the APA Standard of Perfection in 1914.While they don’t produce as many eggs as the more popular chicken breeds, their looks far make up for it. They are simply stunning.They also make excellent mothers and easily go broody.

Silkies

Another breed that doesn’t lay as well, and often goes broody are silkies. Silkies are named so because their feathers tend to be smaller, and silkier, but fluffier – if that makes any sense.While their official origin is unknown, the best guess is that they come from ancient China.The earliest documentation of a “furry chicken” comes from Marco Polo’s travels through Asia in the 13th century.In 1598, Ulisse Aldrovandi, a naturalist in Italy, wrote about “wool-bearing chicken” and “clothed with hair like that of a black cat.”While the breed was officially recognized in 1874, sideshows and breeders would spread the myths that they were actually the offspring of chickens and rabbits, or that they had mammalian fur.They also have black skin and bones, blue earlobes and five toes on each foot.Due to their size, the fact that they waddle more than run, and their fluffy plumage blocking their eyesight, you should not allow silkies to free-range – they’re too easy a target.While they are not great layers, and don’t make an attractive table bird, they are beautiful and people pay a pretty penny for silkies.

Booted Bantams

As their name suggested, booted bantams are bantam (small breed) of feather-footed chickens.While not bred for eggs or meat, these booted bantams are bred almost exclusively for show.And they are show-stoppers.They have large, upright tails, a single comb with five points, downward-pointing wings, and come in more than 20 color varieties.The booted bantam is closely related the Belgian d’Uccle. The Booted bantam is slightly taller, while the Belgain sports a fetching beard.

Faverolles

Faverolles are beautiful feather-footed chickens that were developed in France in the late 1800s.Developed from cochins, hudans and dorkings, faverolles have the size we look for in meat birds, while also being respectable layers.In addition to being productive on the homestead, they have docile, lovely personalities.They have beautiful beards and muffs, and long feathered legs.