Chicken With Feathers on Feet?

This is a question that more than 3178 of our readers have been asking us! Luckily, we have found the most appropriate information for you!

Many small-holding owners choose chickens as a dual-purpose addition for their homestead, egg production, or/and meat and as part of their farm family.

Like people who prefer a specific type of dog, cat, or other animal, chickens also have various breeds from which to choose. Chickens with feathered feet have become very popular and regarded as novelty birds. They make lovely pets, are beautifully colored and are adorable with their bootleg-looking feathery feet and legs. In this article we will discuss different types of chickens, all of them with feathered feet. If you thought chickens are just ordinary animals, you would be pretty amazed at some of the different breeds out there. he females are usually brown, cream, and salmon, whereas the males are more maroon and straw-colored with dark markings. These chickens are easily maintained and produce a sufficient number of eggs for domestic use. Even the name suggests the royalty of this breed, and they were popular with Turkey’s royals . Sultan chickens have minimal egg production, therefore, are seldom kept as a source of food. Bantam Pekin Chickens are easy to tame, great with small children, and have a n amicable and docile temperament. When Pekin chickens are young, they are very calm and gentle, but they can become quite aggressive because of their protective natur e as they get older. They have a single comb, orange or red eyes, a beard, and a muff all around their head. They have five toes instead of four , black skin and bones, blue earlobes, a bluish tint to their flesh , and are often seen in poultry shows. Booted Bantam has a n amiable and calm nature , makes great mothers, broods easily, and is good egg layers . Booted bantams make excellent pets, as they are good with children and get on well with other chickens. They became very popular in the 1800s and 1900s because of their exotic dark red or chocolate brown eggs and were only recognized in America in 2011. Now you know that if you live on a farm or a small-holding, and you are looking for adorable, dual-purpose pets, there is a whole list of beautiful feather-footed chickens to choose from. Whether you want big ones or small ones, they are all fantastic animals and a wonderful addition to any family.

Which types of chickens have feathers on it's feet?

Booted Bantam..Belgian d’Uccle..Brahma..Cochin..Faverolle..Langshan..Silkie..Sultan.

What kind of chicken is black with feathers on feet?

Bantam cochins make a wonderful addition to any flock – and you’ll love how the black variety has feathered legs! This breed is perfect for anyone who is looking for a docile and kid-friendly chicken. The hens lay small brown eggs (because the chicken itself is small), and the roosters enjoy human companionship.

What kind of Bantams have feathered feet?

The breeds that could be in your order will be any of the following feather-legged bantam varieties: Silkies (any color) Black and Black Frizzle Frizzle Cochins. Mottled Cochins.

Why do my chickens have feathers on their feet?

You’d think the feathered legs would provide more warmth in a cold season, rather than be a cause for concern! Especially with bantam feathered leg breeds—since bantams can have more difficulty with cold—you’d think that leg feathers would help. And that’s partly true. They do offer some extra protective insulation.

Most chickens have feathers. Some have more feathers than others, and some have excess feathers all over their legs and feet. Did you know that the domestic chicken that we have today goes as far back as 2,000 B.C.? It is descended from the Red Junglefowl found in Southeast Asia and some parts of South Asia.

The Belgian D’Uccles is a very talkative and affectionate bird with a calm nature and will love to perch on your lap or shoulder. The Booted Bantam also comes in about 20 color varieties (including the Mille Fleur) and have heavily feathered legs and feet. Image Credit: Emma_Ted, PixabayThe Brahma chicken breed is believed to have been developed in the United States from fowls that originated in China and India. These are larger birds that lay medium to large-sized eggs and come in three color varieties – light, dark, and buff. Image Credit: PixabayThe Cochin hails from China and is a large chicken with a ton of feathers that comes in about nine color varieties. These are also large birds that tend to be tall, but they have less feathering on their legs and feet than many of the chickens on this list. Image Credit: Wikimedia CommonsThis breed of chicken hails from the small village of Faverolles in France in the 1860s. Image Credit: PixabayAnother chicken that hails from China, but specifically Peking (known as Beijing today), during the Qing Dynasty, these are small birds that are feathered from head to toe. Image Credit: PixabayAnother breed of chicken that originated in China sometime before the 13th century, these birds were named after their silky feathers. They are very sweet, friendly, and docile chickens that are primarily ornamental birds that make lovely and eye-catching pets. Sultans are small and docile chickens that do not fend for themselves very well (they are prone to bullying, being pecked by other breeds, and easily fall victim to predators). If the coop is muddy, your poor chicken will pick up the mud (and poop with it) and drag it into the nest and on the eggs if she’s broody. A Canadian expat, Nicole now lives on a lush forest property with her Kiwi husband in New Zealand.

Feather footed chickens are a great addition to your flock if you’re looking for something new. You can find chickens with fully feathered legs and breeds with giant bell bottoms.

The problem with mud and chickens with feathers on their feet shows up in the nest box. All those lovely feathers carry mud from the ground, into the nest box and onto the eggs. I don’t wash fresh eggs unless absolutely necessary, the really gross ones go into a carton for my dog and the rest get wiped off before use. Obviously, you don’t need feathered feet to track mud onto eggs but it’s definitely a much bigger issue with the feather-legged chickens. Assuming you can’t avoid the mud and you need to let your birds outside there are a few things you can do to keep the mess down. Try to keep the coop floor covered in a thick layer of bedding; wood shavings, straw or dried leaves work well. I soaked his feet in warm Epsom salt water and rubbed away the casings that grew over the feathers. The feathers were small and curled into balls, most of them fell out when I rubbed off the covering but a few I pulled out. All three of these breeds are homebodies, they enjoy ranging but tend to stick close to home (unlike the ducks that spend more time with my neighbors than with me) and don’t take off when the camera comes out. You’re looking at a longer turn around time than with a cornish cross but you’ll still end up with a decent sized bird on the table. Brahmas are known for their docile personalities, going broody and laying 150+ medium-large brown eggs each year. They have a small pea comb making them a great option for raising chickens in a cold winter climate . Even better they have a reputation for laying the majority of their eggs in the colder winter months when everyone else is resting after the fall molt . One thing to keep in mind when adding giant birds to your flock is the need for lower roosts. I’ve never raised them, my love for Brahmas is directly linked to their size and I try to keep my bantam numbers low or I end up with dozens of tiny eggs that no one but my 3 year old wants haha. Out of my original flock I had two Brahma hens make to old age, one died at 9 and the other made it almost to 11. They’re actually pretty similar to the Brahmas; they also come in both standard and bantam sizes and they’re in the Asiatic class (originated in Asia). Cochins have a single comb, making them less than my personal ideal for the New York winters. They have several unique features that make them stand out against any other chicken, as a result Silkies are the easiest chicks to identify in a crowd. Even though they have literal free range of the place the Silkies stay closest to home, I rarely even see them in front of the house.

People raise chickens for many different reasons. The most common is for egg production, but chickens can also be raised for shows, exhibitions, as pets, or simply to enjoy. Chickens come in hundreds of different breeds. In fact, there are over 500 breeds worldwide although not every breed is officially recognized.

With all the choices there are, it may be difficult to narrow down which chicken breed you want to raise. If you have your sights set on a feather-footed breed, first, define your goals for raising your flock. Even if these chickens will only be pets or yard ornaments, you want to select a breed that will be best suited for the conditions in which they will be raised. Hen – a mature female Pullet – an immature female Rooster – a mature male Cockerel – an immature male Chick – a baby (can be either sex) Dual-purpose – good for eggs and meat Broody – will be willing to incubate and hatch eggs Non-setting – will not be willing to hatch eggs When considering which breed of feather-footed chicken you would like to raise, here are a few points to ponder. You can purchase chicks from a feed store, hatcheries, or even online. Know that if you get “day old” chicks, or hatch them yourself, you will have a mix of hens and roosters. Some towns have rules on keeping chickens in your backyard and don’t allow roosters. If you plan on hatching eggs or showing your birds, you want to track down a farmer that raises a heritage breed. Often the chicks you buy at a feed store or online have been commercially bred. Commercial farmers often overbreed the chickens which reduces their natural instincts. To get good quality specimens of your breed, buy chicks from a reputable breeder, such as Cackle Hatchery . They are part of a group called the Feather Leg Class. If you are a fan of bellbottoms, you will love this feather footed chicken video from YouTube . The translation given to this Belgian breed of chickens is mille fleur, meaning a thousand flowers. Their legs are heavily feathered making them appear to be wearing boots. Very easy to manage Do well in a small coop with a screened-in run Are attractive and come in many colors Lay tiny cream-colored eggs Make great mothers Friendly dispositions and good temperaments Make excellent pets Known as the Supermodel Breed, Booted Bantams are petite and classy. This is a Dutch chicken breed named for the extravagant feathering on the feet and hocks. Appear in 20 color varieties Friendly and calm Good egg producers for bantams Brood easily and make great moms Get along well with other chickens Suitable for children Not fans of severe cold Need to be cleaned and maintained Should have protected coops and soft bedding Their breed was originally developed for meat and for minimal maintenance. Consistent layers Lay all winter Roosters are great as meat birds Friendly personalities, even the roosters They come in bantam size Gorgeous feathering and they come in 3 color varieties Do well in confinement Cold hardy Don’t brood easily Roosters are not great for protecting the hens Prone to muddy feat feathers Do best in cool climates It originated in China and its popularity spread to Europe and America. It’s not a breed you will find at a commercial poultry farm but they are very popular for backyard chicken keepers. Large and beautiful birds with an abundance of fancy feathers Come in standard size or bantam Available in an array of different color variations Easy to handle and great for families with children Make great mothers because they love hatching and raising chicks Cold hardy Happy to be confined Not good flyers so they are easy keepers Not the best breed for egg-laying Feathers will get muddy in wet weather Overheat in the summer if not properly cared for This French feathered feet phenom was developed in the 19th century. Do well in confinement or free-range Standard size is a good dual-purpose Great layers even in winter Lay eggs with a pinkish tint Mature early Brood easily and make excellent mothers Bred for quality meat Very active but gentle and make great pets Due to heavy feathering, they are prone to external parasites Make take a few generations of breeding to refine the desired color Also known as the Croad Langshan, this heavy and soft breed is rumored to have begun in China. They are specifically bred to be good layers and will lay through the winter They do well in cold conditions but do not well when exposed to extreme weather. They are a docile breed that thrives under conditions where they are kept dry and clean. Docile birds that are easily tamed Great layers and will lay in winter Adapt to confinement or free-range Excellent sitters and mothers Cold hardy Come in three colors, white, black, and blue Large birds with beautiful feathering Don’t do well exposed to the elements Need to be kept in dry soil conditions This breed is named for its delightfully fluffy plumage that feels like a cross between satin and silk. One of the most popular breeds of ornamental chickens Commonly used to incubate other bird’s eggs Come in two varieties, bearded and non-bearded Great for confinement as they can’t fly Make very good mothers Come in a variety of colors Only come in bantam size Tend to get eaten by predators if left to free-range Not good egg layers Can be bullied by more aggressive breeds Sultans belong to the crested chicken group and originated in Turkey. They have been primarily an ornamental breed and were bred to keep in the sultans’ gardens during the Ottoman empire. Very docile and friendly Bred for doing well in confinement Do not tend to go broody Impressive plumage includes crests, beards, long tails, dense foot feathering Come in 3 varieties, black, blue, and white Lay small, white eggs Main purpose is as an ornamental breed Not good layers Need special care to protect their feathering

9 Chicken Breeds With Feathered Feet

1. Faverolles

FaverollesThese chickens are very gentle and come in a variety of colors like salmon and white. Faverolles were bred in France to provide eggs for the winter.This breed is rare these days and mainlyhe females are usually brown, cream, and salmon, whereas the males are more maroon and straw-colored with dark markings.The chicks are very fluffy and also have fuzz on their legs and feet. Faverolles chickens

2. Cochin Chickens

A Cochin chickenCochins are known as backyard chickens and rarely used commercially. These chickens are easily maintained andCochin chickens have anCochins love the cold due to their thick feathers. A cochin’s eggs are usually brown and very big. The shell of a cochin egg isCochin chickens come in various colors such as partridge, silver laced, golden laced, blue, white, splash, buff, and black.

3. Sultan Chickens

Even the name suggests the royalty of this breed, and they wereSultan chickens have minimal egg production, therefore, are seldom kept as a source of food. They have a puffy crest, muffs, thick feathers, and legs that resemble a feather duster.These birds are primarily pure white but can also be blue or black, and instead of having four toes like a regular chicken,

4. Brahma Chickens

These chickens areBrahma chickens are bred for their egg and meat, and they are one of the largest chicken breeds in the world. Brahma’s mostly lay eggs in the winter, and their eggs are relatively small.Due to their calm demeanor, Brahma chickens are often bullied by other, larger chickens, and they don’t fight back.They are a

5. Pekin (Bantam)

The Pekin is part of theBantam Pekin Chickens are easy to tame, great with small children, and have aWhen Pekin chickens are young, they are very calm and gentle, but they can become quite aggressive because of theirThey haveThe list keeps growing as breeders are endlessly trying to achieve new colors. Pekins are quite round in shape, and they have

6. Belgian D’Uccle (also called Barbu D’Uccle, meaning ‘bearded’)

Belgian D’Uccle’s originates in central Belgium in a town called Uccle. They are one in a group of elevenSadly, only 168 of these birds were counted in all of Belgium in 2010 and are on the verge of extinction.They have a single comb, orange or red eyes, a beard, and a muff all around their head. Their muff almost gives them aBelgian D’Uccle comes in various colors such as white, porcelain, and Mille Fleurs (mahogany/reddish-brown). Their feathers are crescent shapes that are black and end in a white V-shaped tip.Their feathers almost look like living flowers because of their beautiful patterns.They are tiny chickens with lovely, friendly personalities. They are very curious, and they love to interact with people.They only produce about

7. Silkie

The SilkieSilkies are somewhat different from other feather-footed chickens. They haveThese birds are very friendly and are considered to be theThere are two types of Silkie varieties, the

8. Booted Bantam

Named theThis breedThey come in various beautiful colors such as; grey, self-blue, lemon Mille Fleur, silver Mille Fleur, Mille Fleur (most widely known), porcelain, white, lavender, partridge, golden neck, Columbian, mottled, and white.They are named ‘booted’ due to their bell-bottom-looking, feathery feet. Booted Bantam has aBooted bantams make excellent pets, as they are good with children and get on well with other chickens.These are small birds, and they are often kept as show chickens in poultry shows.

9. Copper Marans

The Copper Maran is considered anThey became very popular in the 1800s and 1900s because of theirThey are veryCopper Marans layThey are beautiful chickens in various colors such as; golden cuckoo, wheaten, black, black-tailed, black copper, cuckoo, white, Columbian, and birchen.

1. Belgian D’Uccles

These chickens are also known as the Barbu D’Uccles and are from Belgium. They come in as many as 20 different color varieties in their native country but are commonly Mille Fleur (which translates to “million flowers” as they are speckled and orange in color). They have feathered legs and four toes, with only the outer toe that is feathered.They are considered an ornamental chicken as they are small in size, gorgeous, and their eggs are quite small. The Belgian D’Uccles is a very talkative and affectionate bird with a calm nature and will love to perch on your lap or shoulder.

2. Booted Bantam

The Booted Bantam is also called the Sablepoot, or the Dutch Booted Bantam, as they are indeed Dutch. The Booted Bantam is actually very similar to the Belgian D’Uccles in appearance but are generally a little bigger and don’t have a “beard” of feathers like the D’Uccle. The Booted Bantam also comes in about 20 color varieties (including the Mille Fleur) and have heavily feathered legs and feet.These birds are sometimes referred to as the supermodel breed and are only used for exhibiting due to their small eggs and size. The Booted Bantam is a friendly, calm, and easygoing chicken that can make an excellent pet.

3. Brahma

The Brahma chicken breed is believed to have been developed in the United States from fowls that originated in China and India. These are larger birds that lay medium to large-sized eggs and come in three color varieties – light, dark, and buff. Their feathers also cover their legs and toes.These are one of the largest breeds of chicken and are used for both meat as well as their eggs. Brahmas are very docile and calm chickens that actually do best in northern climates as they are able to handle the cold much better than other breeds.

4. Cochin

The Cochin hails from China and is a large chicken with a ton of feathers that comes in about nine color varieties. They lay eggs that are large in size and are feathered from head to toe.These birds may be large but are very gentle and friendly – the males are rarely aggressive and can be tamed quite easily. They also do quite well in colder climates and would just as easily make themselves at home in the yard or in your home.

5. Croad Langshan

A unique name for a unique bird. The Croad Langshan originated in the Langshan district of China but was imported into the U.K. in 1872 by Major Croad for a poultry show. They can be white but are mostly seen in black with a gorgeous iridescent sheen of green. These are also large birds that tend to be tall, but they have less feathering on their legs and feet than many of the chickens on this list.They lay large eggs that are usually various shades of brown but have occasionally been known to lay eggs that are plum in color. The Croad Langshan is a calm and gentle bird that can make a great pet.

6. Faverolles

This breed of chicken hails from the small village of Faverolles in France in the 1860s. Today, these chickens are rare and large in size and lay medium-sized eggs. They come in white, mahogany, and salmon colors and sport beards and muffs (shorter feathers on the cheeks and chin) as well as five feathered toes.Faverolles are also quite calm and docile birds that can be rather shy and do well in colder weather. They are also curious birds that enjoy a nice cuddle, but they have been listed as ‘threatened’ by the Livestock Conservancy.

7. French Marans

The Marans (pronounced ‘muh-ran’) chickens originated in Marans, France, in the late 1800s. They come in a large variety of colors but are commonly seen in black copper and cuckoo (which is similar to barred coloration). The French Marans are the only breed that has feathered feet and legs (English Marans do not have feathers on their legs and feet).The Marans are famous for laying very dark brown eggs, and they have a variety of temperaments. Some might be very friendly and docile, while others could be skittish and nervous. In general, they are friendly and might follow you around, but they tend to not want to be touched or handled.

8. Pekin

Another chicken that hails from China, but specifically Peking (known as Beijing today), during the Qing Dynasty, these are small birds that are feathered from head to toe. They come in about 12 varieties of color, and they lay small eggs.The Pekin is a very gentle and docile bird and can make wonderful pets for the family, but Pekin Bantam cocks might become more aggressive as they mature due to their protective natures. However, if you’re looking for a hen to hug, then the Pekin is an adorable, pint-sized chicken just right for you.

9. Silkie

Another breed of chicken that originated in China sometime before the 13th century, these birds were named after their silky feathers. These beautiful little birds may have been written about by Marco Polo, who wrote in 1298, they “have hair like cats, are black, and lay the best of eggs.” They come in lots of colors but are commonly seen in white and have five feathered toes and black or dark blue skin.Silkies aren’t good egg layers but are great at hatching eggs from other birds. They are very sweet, friendly, and docile chickens that are primarily ornamental birds that make lovely and eye-catching pets.

10. Sultan

Lastly, we have the Sultan chicken, which comes from Turkey (where it’s called Serai Taook, which loosely translates to ‘Sultan’s Fowl’) and was essentially a living ornament in the gardens of Sultans. They come in several colors but are usually white and have muffs and beards and large crests of feathers on their heads. Their five toes and legs are also feathered.Sultans are small and docile chickens that do not fend for themselves very well (they are prone to bullying, being pecked by other breeds, and easily fall victim to predators). They are loving and sweet birds but will need some TLC as they don’t do well in cold or wet weather.

Fighting with Mud

The biggest issue is with mud. I free range my birds and living in the North East we get lots of it. There are actually very few months where there isn’t at least a little mud.The problem with mud and chickens with feathers on their feet shows up in the nest box. All those lovely feathers carry mud from the ground, into the nest box and onto the eggs.I don’t wash fresh eggs unless absolutely necessary, the really gross ones go into a carton for my dog and the rest get wiped off before use.Obviously, you don’t need feathered feet to track mud onto eggs but it’s definitely a much bigger issue with the feather-legged chickens.Read more about

Keeping Eggs Clean During the Mud Season

Assuming you can’t avoid the mud and you need to let your birds outside there are a few things you can do to keep the mess down.

Extra Bedding

Try to keep the coop floor covered in a thick layer of bedding; wood shavings, straw or dried leaves work well. It’ll help get the mud off their feet as they walk in to the coop.

Longer Distance to the Nest Boxes

It also helps if they need to take a longer walk from the door of the coop to the nest boxes, depending on the layout and size of your coop that may not be possible.The further they have to walk through the bedding, the more time it has to soak up some of the mud and wetness.

Keep them Inside Longer

Most chickens lay early in the day and if they lay their eggs before they get a change to get muddy your eggs will stay cleaner.

Foot Feather Problems

Chickens can get ingrown feathers anywhere, I’ve had a few hens get them on their backs. I think they were caused by roosters being roosters when the ladies were molting.But by far the most cases of ingrown feathers have been on my birds feathered feet.In the picture above you can see the red and irritated patches on the outsides of the feet where the feathers should be.This guy was my favorite rooster, his name was Bruce. I soaked his feet in warm Epsom salt water and rubbed away the casings that grew over the feathers.The feathers were small and curled into balls, most of them fell out when I rubbed off the covering but a few I pulled out. I was afraid they would end up bleeding and cause more issues if I left them in.Read more about Blood Feathers & What to do if they BreakHe had a lot of foot problems in his old age, I think it was gout which causes swelling in the feet. Gout can be caused by too much calcium and a large breed rooster eating layer is a good way to get too much calcium.

Types of Feather Footed Chickens

When it comes to feather footed chickens you have quite a few options. Today I’m going to share three of my favorite chicken breeds.They’re all birds that I have in my current flock and the cover the whole size spectrum so there is something for everyone!It’s worth noting that the majority of my random barnyard chicken photos feature these three breeds, even though I have more than a dozen types of chickens at this point.All three of these breeds are homebodies, they enjoy ranging but tend to stick close to home (unlike the ducks that spend more time with my neighbors than with me) and don’t take off when the camera comes out.

Brahma Chickens

We’re going to start with my favorite chickens, many years ago I asked a bunch of my favorite homestead bloggers about their favorite chicken breeds, even then I had my Brahmas at number one.Brahmas are everything I look for in a chicken; giant, fluffy, calm, hardy, and friendly.They’re some of the biggest chickens you’ll come across, full-grown roosters weigh in at 12 pounds and hens at 9.5 pounds. Once you add a mountain of fluffy feathers to that you’ve got quite a large bird on your hands.Thanks to that large size they’re also useful as a meat bird. You’re looking at a longer turn around time than with a cornish cross but you’ll still end up with a decent sized bird on the table.Brahmas are known for their docile personalities, going broody and laying 150+ medium-large brown eggs each year. They have a small pea comb making them a great option for raising chickens in a cold winter climate.Even better they have a reputation for laying the majority of their eggs in the colder winter months when everyone else is resting after the fall molt. I have a variety of egg layers but I do notice a shift from a lot of blue eggs to a majority of brown eggs in the winter when the Easter Eggers take a break.One thing to keep in mind when adding giant birds to your flock is the need for lower roosts. I have two sets of roosts, one is about 6.5 feet off the ground and the other is the DIY folding roosts I made with my daughter.The chickens self-segregate with the lighter-bodied birds like the EEs & my Appenzellar Spitzhaubens hanging out up top and the larger birds, Brahmas & Cochins, preferring the lower roosts.They come in three color variations, the most common is the Light Brahma, which is what I have. It’s harder to track down and you’ll pay more but you can order Buff and Dark Brahmas from online hatcheries.You can also find bantam Buff Brahmas. I’ve never raised them, my love for Brahmas is directly linked to their size and I try to keep my bantam numbers low or I end up with dozens of tiny eggs that no one but my 3 year old wants haha.Out of my original flock I had two Brahma hens make to old age, one died at 9 and the other made it almost to 11. The Livestock Conservancy isn’t kidding when they call these birds hardy!

Cochin Chickens

The next magically fluffy bird on our list is the Cochin. They’re actually pretty similar to the Brahmas; they also come in both standard and bantam sizes and they’re in the Asiatic class (originated in Asia).They also lay medium-large brown eggs and can be used as a dual-purpose breed for both eggs and meat. Cochins are known for a docile temperament and going broody.That big guy is “Super Fluffy” and he’s a real sweetheart. When we were overrun with roosters earlier this year the younger ones kept him out of the barn.Finding Super Fluffy became a nightly ritual and he became quite fond of eating out of my hand.They’re large birds but not quite as weighty as the Brahmas. The roosters and hens are about a pound lighter at 11 and 8.5 pounds.Even with all that in common, it’s quite easy to tell them apart at a glance. Brahmas have feathered feet, which gives them a bell-bottom silhouette.Cochins have fully feathered legs and that makes them look like a ball. A round, fluffy chicken ball.They come in a dizzying variety of colors, with over 15 recognized color patterns in both the standard and bantam sizes. Right now I have splash Cochin hens, a splash rooster and gold-laced Cochin hens that I call my Halloween chickens.Cochins have a single comb, making them less than my personal ideal for the New York winters. You don’t get the frostbite issues with smaller comb birds.Learn more about

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Ashley Lee
Moms: I used to be cool and do cool things. Now I just argue with a smaller version of myself about how to use the toilet. Always do your best. What you plant now. Troublemaker. Reader. Thinker. Writer. Student. Introvert. Friendly internet enthusiast. Interests: Organizing, Camping
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