Chicken Nesting Boxes Plans?

Your hens dont need nesting boxes to lay their eggs. However, that means they would lay their eggs wherever they could. Egg collecting will then be a very stressful game of treasure hunt. Furthermore, you or chickens could accidentally crack the eggs therefore increase the mortality rate of the unborn chicks.

A good, sturdy nesting box is a must on every happy and productive coop. Make sure you take that into account and install a sturdy lock if you have predator problems .

The triplex has three compartments or nesting boxes which is enough to support an average-sized flock. Its also a quick way to create a nesting spot for your chickens or just to find a good use for your 5-gallon buckets. This nesting box is the perfect choice if you frequently crave eggs in the morning.

Of course, as you could imagine, a rolling nesting spot wont be inviting any hens! This next nesting box is undoubtedly one of the most adorable options on the list. If you need some space, you can lower the nesting box and opt for creating a cabinet above it.

However, you wouldnt have to worry about eggs falling and cracking with the added roll-away feature. Its a great way to recycle and give your chickens a cozy place to lay their eggs! As youve seen earlier, many of the nesting boxes look identical to different kinds of shelves.

If thats the case, the single compartment nesting box might be the perfect one for you! Furthermore, since it is a roll-away, it gives your eggs an extra measure of protection from falling from a high place or being stepped on. Furthermore, if your old tires have been placed near their coop for some time, you wont have much trouble introducing the new nesting box to them.

If you have a milk crate youre not using for anything, why dont we turn that into a simple but trusty nesting box. Chicken nesting boxes are undeniably necessary to have for a happy chicken-raising journey. It makes egg collecting easier, and it boosts the survival rate of your unborn chicks.

Making your own nesting box is a great way to add your own touch to your coop. We hope we were able to help you find the perfect chicken nesting box for you and your girls!

What size should a chicken nesting box be?

How many nesting boxes you’ll need per chicken varies depending on the size of your birds, but your best bet will be to make sure your boxes are 12 inches x 12 inches x 12 inches. This should give your ladies more than enough space to lay their eggs and ensure they’re comfortable at the same time.

How many nesting boxes do I need for 5 chickens?

Usually, one nest box for every 4-5 hens is enough. It is not uncommon for all the hens to lay in one or two favorite nesting boxes, even when you’ve provided many other nesting options! These elevated nest boxes work well for this flock.

What is the best material to put in a chicken nesting box?

What Should I Put in the Nesting Boxes? Good choices for nesting box material include straw, pine shavings, pine needles, dried leaves or shredded paper.

How many nesting boxes do you need for 20 hens?

How Many Nesting Boxes Do I Need for 20 Chickens? The guidelines scale up the same regardless of how many chickens you have. This means, for 20 chickens you should have 4-5 nest boxes.

In this article we cover everything you need to know about nesting boxes. How many your hens need, what size they need to be and much more. We also review some pre-made boxes and also give you 13 simple DIY nesting box plans to build your own.

They can sit and lay their egg in private and when done, simply hop off the nest and carry on with important things like foraging or dust bathing. In the wild a hen will find a quiet, secluded spot and make a nest.

Although it may look adorable to have two girls laying in the same box, it can be hard on the eggs as they frequently get broken. The benefits of plastic are that it is lightweight, washable and lasts for a long time. If you are using wooden boxes then remember that they are much heavier than plastic and may need some extra supports to safely hold them in place.

Pre-made nest boxes will have holes pre-drilled that lets you easily screw them to the wall. They need to be in the quietest and darkest area of the coop and placed between 18-24 inches from the ground. Do not place them under roosting perches as they will be covered in poop on a daily basis.

Whether you line the boxes up like soldiers or stagger them in height and location is a personal choice. Hens like to be fairly social when nesting, so lining them up is perfect for the ladies to have a chat while laying that egg. Installing them should not take you too long once you have your boxes, tools and hardware gathered together.

Curtains will help with the privacy, quiet and dark that hens prefer to lay in. Your curtains should fit over the front of the box and be made of a lightweight fabric that is easy for the girls to push aside. I am challenged when it comes to sewing so I prefer to use the empty feed sacks for my curtains.

It can take a bit of time to train your hens to use the nesting boxes. Once they start this behavior you can help to guide them by placing fake eggs (or golf balls) in the nest boxes. If you manage to find her in the act of laying elsewhere, try picking her up and putting her in a nest box.

The biggest issue you will find is getting the hens to use them for laying (read our training advice above). You can use cardboard doors to close the nests and then re-open the boxes in the morning ready for the hens to start laying. Finally, you will find that sometimes hens will completely ignore a nesting box .

If you have it placed in the busiest area of the coop with no privacy and lots of light then the hens are not going to use it. Hens are smart creatures and will try to minimize threats to their offspring (eggs) by laying in places they consider secure and well camouflaged. Nests are a touch small for larger breeds like Jersey Giants.

It is made of high density plastic so it will last a long time. The ingenuity of the Dakota nest design makes it a prime choice for backyard chicken coops. What makes this box special are the holes which allow for easy egg pickup.

This plan features two nesting boxes combined into one unit, so it will fit six hens. This nesting box has a unique A-framed design and because it is so tall it can accommodate larger breeds as well. If you are looking for a large nesting box that can be fixed to a coop then the Beverly design could be for you.

This plan is very similar to the Tabitha, except it includes an additional stack of three nesting boxes. Overall this plan is suitable for smaller coops that need the nests to be stacked on top of each other. Once your hens are ladies trained you do not need to search the yard for those tasty eggs.

If youre working on a tight budget, building your nesting boxes from pallets could be the way to go. This tutorial shows you how to use pallets to create the perfect nesting boxes.

Youll need to hunt for the nesting box plans and ideas which will best fit your set-up. Plastic storage bins make a great way to have nesting boxes on a tight budget.

Fill it with hay, and your chickens will make it their new favorite laying spot in no time. Why toss those containers to the landfill when they make perfect nesting boxes? When we first began keeping chickens, we used these milk crates as our nesting boxes.

The only thing worth mentioning is its important to make sure you place something under the milk crates to ensure your eggs wont fall through the slats. Do you want traditional style nesting boxes, but youre working on a tight budget? This tutorial walks you through how to build your own DIY nesting boxes for hardly any money at all.

These nesting boxes are easy to create, are a great way to repurpose an old piece of furniture, and they look nice too. Everyone may not be able to understand this post because its written in a different language, but dont let this deter you from checking out this idea. The plans are done on a computer which makes them easy to print off, read, and follow to give you the greatest opportunity for a successful build.

Be aware youll want the lids to be on lock down because if not, a raccoon or snake can easily find their way into your boxes and take your eggs. Wine barrels can be rather expensive, but if you have one on hand which you arent using, consider putting it to use in your hen house. From there, the chickens crawl right inside and lay their delicious eggs in a fashionable nesting box.

You can sometimes find large plastic bowls on sale at your local big box store towards the end of summer. If you would like to give your chickens as much space as possible in their coop, hanging their nesting boxes on the wall is the way to go. Instead of placing the dresser on the floor, they hang it on the wall and give the hens a ladder to climb when they wish to lay.

Youll cut the tires in half and let your chickens get inside them to lay their eggs.

We then present both shop bought solutions and DIY plans with simple step-by-step instructions to build your own. We will show you the various types and explain their advantages and disadvantages.

The nesting box is essential for you , the flock keeper, unless you enjoy searching the yard, outbuildings, and under every bush or overhang for eggs! In this article, we cover the basics of nesting boxes, including best placement, recommended sizes, and how many you need for your flock.

Roll Out Nesting Box Quality Materials Easy Cleaning Wall mounts and perch included The nesting box requires a few things to make it attractive to a hen. Ideally, the boxes will be placed in an area of the coop that is fairly dark and not too busy.

The height of the nest box should be no less than 18 inches from the floor and can be as high as a few feet off the ground. They should not be at the same height as your roosting bars, or you may find your hens sleeping in the boxes! Although this is not a major catastrophe, you will get tired of mucking out the nest boxes each morning.

This number is in line with the 5 Freedoms recommended by animal welfare groups . A standard nest box for regular chickens such as Leghorns, Sussex , Plymouth Rocks, and hybrid layers needs to be a 12-inch cube, 12 inches tall, wide and deep. To encourage the hens to relax while laying and deter pests, add some fresh herbs to the boxes .

Lavender aids relaxation while lemon balm gives a fresh lemony smell and deters pests too. Keep them locked in the coop until they have laid eggs; make sure only the nesting boxes have bedding . If you arent very DIY or dont have enough time to make your own, then shop-bought nesting boxes will work for you.

Miller Single Hen Nesting Box Easy to clean and will not rot or corrode The sloped roof stops them from roosting Inbuilt mounts to easily fasten to the wall Ready-made plastic laying boxes are generally the cheapest ones on the market; they are ideal for beginners and small flocks. As you buy them individually, it gives you the flexibility to fix them outside the coop or other suitable locations (such as nearby trees or outbuildings).

They are easy to clean, withstand a lot of abuse, and are relatively lightweight compared to wood. You will generally find that metal nesting boxes are sturdier than their plastic or wooden counterparts, making them more suitable for larger breeds such as Jersey Giants. This prevents pecking or accidental breakage from trampling and keeps the egg much cleaner.

Like the GooseBox, this design is also portable, meaning you can place them throughout the run to provide your girls some privacy. Built by Lisa from Fresh Eggs Daily, this nesting box started as a wooden half wine barrel. Each nesting box takes around 10 minutes to build and accommodate up to 3 laying hens.

Each nesting box can accommodate up to 3 laying hens, so just repeat as many times as needed for your flock. The downside to this particular style is that you need to fit it into an existing coop to work properly. My favorite feature about this particular design is the roosting rail fitted to the front of the box.

If youre building this as a portable nesting box, remember to fit a wooden back to it. When making your boxes, ensure they have a steep pitch to the roof so that the hens cant roost on top of them. Hens do like privacy when laying their egg, so hanging a simple curtain over the entrance will do a good job of screening her from prying eyes.

Staples or a push pin can hold them it doesnt need to be fancy. They are relatively cheap to buy, even easier to make, and essential for you if you dont want to play hide and seek with your hens!

Nesting Room

Let’s start with what I like to call the nesting room. It’s one of the best choices out there if you already have a coop. Instead of making a separate structure, you can make an extension on one side of your coop. This upgrade would effectively make your nesting boxes into a nesting room.This modification to the coop will introduce a new opening. Make sure you take that into account and install a sturdy lock if you have predator problems.If you don’t want to do any renovation on your coop, this next one might suit your taste.The triplex has three compartments or nesting boxes which is enough to support an average-sized flock. It’s simple but can be trusted to do its job well. It’s a pretty good go-to nesting box if you’re not quite sure what you want yet. However, it’s too early to give up! We still have 24 more nesting boxes for you to check out!

The Quadruplex

You might be hesitant with the triplex if you have some hens who lay eggs often. Well, we believe more is better than less. So, if you’re not yet sure about the numbers, maybe the quadruplex is what you’re looking for. It’s still simple and very doable. However, as the name suggests, it has four compartments compared to the triplex’s three partitions.The triplex and the quadruplex will not be enough if you have a big flock on your hands. In that case, you might like this 2-story nest. It offers you more room without taking up so much space horizontally. Just make sure there is a way for your chickens to get to the top bunker if they wish to lay their eggs up there.

The 3-Story Nesting Shelf

If you still need more rooms, then don’t worry. We have just the thing.This one is similar to the previous plan. However, it offers an extra level to house more hens. It is ideal if you have a big flock and you’re looking to start your own poultry business. Hopefully, with this one, you’ll never need more nesting boxes!Okay, maybe woodwork projects are not your thing. You don’t need to worry! We have several nesting boxes here that don’t require you to saw any wood.The nesting bowl allows you to have as many nesting spots that you need without much trouble. It is also cost-efficient and easy to do. Additionally, it’s also a great way to add color to your coop! It seems you wouldn’t have anything to lose with the nesting bowls.

Nesting Containers

If your chickens are on the larger side, then plastic bowls may not work. In that case, the nesting containers might be what you need. It’s still easy to do, and if you know where to look, you could also get some plastic containers that cost the same as the plastic bowls.If you have some cats, then you probably have some kitty litter buckets somewhere. Well, it’s time to gather those buckets and put them to good use!The kitty litter nest is one of the most cost-efficient nesting boxes on this list. Furthermore, it is also a fun recycling project. It is an inexpensive choice, but you don’t need to worry. It would most probably do the job just as well.Do you remember our 5-gallon bucket feeders? Well, if you have some of those buckets left, then you can also make a 5-gallon bucket nest for your hens!A 5-gallon bucket nest is a good option as it’s easy to do but also durable. Additionally, it will also be easy to clean. It’s also a quick way to create a nesting spot for your chickens or just to find a good use for your 5-gallon buckets.As the name suggests, this is similar to the previous idea. However, this one allows you to easily collect the eggs.This nesting box is the perfect choice if you frequently crave eggs in the morning. This one allows you to get those fresh eggs without having to go in the coop! It’s hard tiptoeing around chicken poo when you still haven’t gotten your coffee yet, after all.

Mounted 5-gallon Bucket Nest

Here’s another nest using 5-gallon buckets. Since most buckets are circular, there is a chance that they would roll away if there’s nothing to stop it. Of course, as you could imagine, a rolling nesting spot won’t be inviting any hens! In that case, you might want to mount it on a wall where it will be secured in place.This next nesting box is undoubtedly one of the most adorable options on the list. The barrel nest can double as a nesting box and a charming display. However, it is not only about looks. The barrel nest is also sturdy and can be a trustworthy nesting box. Just imagine your hens while they are laying their egg in there! It’s a delightful image, don’t you agree?

Mounted Nest

The mounted nest is a good idea if you plan on putting the nesting box outside of the coop or somewhere where predators might be surrounding the area. It’s also a great choice if you’re trying to conserve space. However, make sure the hens could still reach the nesting box!The downside of the mounted nest is that the eggs could accidentally roll out, and since it’s in a high place, you could most probably expect the egg to crack.As the name would suggest, this one is similar to the previous idea.The frame of this nesting box is mounted to the wall. However, it is not placed as high as the previous nest. Furthermore, this also offers an alternative way to conserve space. If you need some space, you can lower the nesting box and opt for creating a cabinet above it.

Mounted Roll-away Nest

Let us say you would like to have a mounted nesting box. However, you’re worried about the eggs accidentally falling and cracking. In that case, the mounted roll-away nest might be the perfect one for you.You can place this one as high as you’d like, given that your chickens could reach it. However, you wouldn’t have to worry about eggs falling and cracking with the added roll-away feature.Do you have an old china cabinet? Well, let us interest you in making it into a nesting box. It’s a great way to recycle and give your chickens a cozy place to lay their eggs!With the structure of most china cabinets – or cabinets in general – you won’t have to do much work anymore. Put in the necessities, and it’s probably ready to use.

The Nesting Shelf

On the other hand, you might have an old shelf just lying around or ready for disposal. Why don’t we make that into a nesting box?As you’ve seen earlier, many of the nesting boxes look identical to different kinds of shelves. So, if you have one that you’re ready to let go of, then it could be a premade frame for your nesting box! You only need to make a few adjustments here and there, and you have yourself a nesting shelf!On the other hand, you might only have a few hens, and you only want something simple. If that’s the case, the single compartment nesting box might be the perfect one for you! It’s simple, pretty easy to craft, and you can even use an old pallet for it.

The Tote Nest

Totes are one of the easiest materials to acquire, so if you have a spare tote or you’re looking to start making your nesting box soon, then you might like this one.With its structure, it could give your hens the privacy they need if they want to! Furthermore, its form also allows you to easily collect the eggs.If you want to use a tote for your chicken nest, but the last one isn’t your cup of tea, then the tote roll-away might be what you’re looking for. Furthermore, since it is a roll-away, it gives your eggs an extra measure of protection from falling from a high place or being stepped on.

Inverted Tote Nest

Here’s another way to make a tote into a nesting box. If you are certain you want to use a tote, but you’re not yet sure which style you would prefer, then you might want to try out both and let your chickens decide. Either way, the different designs are all very doable and durable.Do you have some old tires? Well, don’t let it go to waste! With a few adjustments here and there, your chickens would most probably love to use it. Depending on where you would place your tire nest, it could be a cozy little place for your hens to start laying some eggs.Furthermore, if your old tires have been placed near their coop for some time, you won’t have much trouble introducing the new nesting box to them. Don’t forget to make it look inviting so they’d know it’s the new nesting nook!

Easy-clean Nest

If you have many hens that lay eggs often, then the easy-clean nest might be what you are looking for. It offers you a lot of nesting boxes, but at the same time, it will not give you a difficult time when it is time to clean after your ladies.If you have a milk crate you’re not using for anything, why don’t we turn that into a simple but trusty nesting box. It’s a good choice if you and your chickens are not especially picky. It just needs a few adjustments, and it’s usable as any other nesting box.

The Milk Crate Nesting Nook

If you have a few hens on your flock and you have a few more milk crates, then you might want to upgrade that milk crate nest into a full-on nesting nook.However, since the milk crate has many crevices. It won’t be that easy to clean when it’s time to tidy up, so you might want to keep that in mind.

How many nesting boxes do chickens need?

A good rule to follow is one box for every three to four hens.Personally I prefer to have the ratio slightly higher (especially if you have more than a dozen or so chickens). Regardless of how many nests you have they will always squabble over their favorite box. Although most of the nesting boxes should be placed in the coop, you can have a couple placed around the inside of the barn.This makes sure that there are enough boxes for everyone in a variety of quiet spots.

Where should I put the nesting boxes?

This will mainly depend on the size of your chickens.Each nesting box should only accommodate one hen. Although it may look adorable to have two girls laying in the same box, it can be hard on the eggs as they frequently get broken.

Which material is best?

Your nesting boxes should be either wood or plastic. Both of these materials are durable and washable.The benefits of plastic are that it is lightweight, washable and lasts for a long time. On the other hand wood can look nicer and is very sturdy.

How To Install Nesting Boxes

Most nesting boxes will attach to the wall of your coop.You will need to make sure that the framework of your coop can support the number of boxes you will place.If you are using wooden boxes then remember that they are much heavier than plastic and may need some extra supports to safely hold them in place.Pre-made nest boxes will have holes pre-drilled that lets you easily screw them to the wall.You will need to decide where you are going to place your boxes.They need to be in the quietest and darkest area of the coop and placed between 18-24 inches from the ground. Do not place them under roosting perches as they will be covered in poop on a daily basis.If you have birds that do not fly well (such as Silkies) you can place the boxes on the floor for them.Whether you line the boxes up like soldiers or stagger them in height and location is a personal choice. Hens like to be fairly social when nesting, so lining them up is perfect for the ladies toInstalling them should not take you too long once you have your boxes, tools and hardware gathered together. Your hens will want to help!

How To Decorate Your Nesting Box

Some folks love to decorate their nesting boxes, while other people not so much.The chickens?They do not care much one way or the other, but there are some decorations that are beneficial to your hens.First of all you can use curtains.Curtains will help with the privacy, quiet and dark that hens prefer to lay in. Your curtains should fit over the front of the box and be made of a lightweight fabric that is easy for the girls to push aside.I am challenged when it comes to sewing so I prefer to use the empty feed sacks for my curtains.You can replace these curtains when they get dirty or damaged.Next you can also use herbs (pennyroyal, mint, lavender and chamomile).If you want to add some color you can add some marigold flowers. They are great insect deterrents and hens like to eat them too.

Training Hens to Lay In Nesting Boxes

It can take a bit of time to train your hens to use the nesting boxes.You need to start training your hens when they are at point of lay (usually around 16-20 weeks old). Once your pullets are thinking about laying eggs you should be able to tell from their behavior.They may be restless, anxious and distracted wandering from place to place looking forYou can expect a few hiccups along the way but once they get the idea they are usually more than happy to use the box.Another trick to getting them to use the box is to sprinkle some scratch or cracked corn in the box for a couple of days.Just make sure to keep the boxes clean and the bedding fresh.They will be reluctant to use them if there is any poop or dirt in it.Of course you will always have an independent hen that will lay wherever she wants to.If you manage to find her in the act of laying elsewhere, try picking her up and putting her in a nest box. Some folks have good success with this method although it might take a few times before she takes the hint.

Common Problems With Nesting Boxes

You should expect to come across many problems with your nesting boxes.The biggest issue you will find is getting the hens to use them for laying (read our training advice above).Another common issue isYou can use cardboardNext up is sharing nesting boxes – this is a common habit which should be discouraged. Hens are sociable creatures and enjoy the company of their sisters. They may look cute sitting together but you will likely end up with broken or at least dirty eggs. Chickens nesting together should be picked up and placed in another nesting box.Now onto broody hens. These chickens will choose a nesting box and sit, and sit and sit. This can be frustrating to the other chickens who may try to move her out, but if she is determined she will start screaming at them to go away and will be dishing out pecks to anyone who tries to move her. If you do not want chicks then you will need to hoist her out of the nest and break her from her broodiness.Finally, you will find thatIf you have it placed in the busiest area of the coop with no privacy and lots of light then the hens are not going to use it. Hens are smart creatures and will try to minimize threats to their offspring (eggs) by laying in places they consider secure and well camouflaged.

DIY Chicken Nesting Box Plans

Rite Farm Chicken Nesting BoxThese nesting boxes are very simple, effective and are suitable for most chickens.The Rite Farm Chicken Nesting Box comes in a pack of 6 nests. Each nest is made of durable molded plastic and measures 18″x12″x12″. These nests are very sturdy and have an egg gathering hole if you want to gather eggs from outside the coop. Each nest can either be placed on the floor or fixed to a coop wall. If you are looking for affordable nests that are easy to install then this is a good option for you.

Shop Nesting Boxes on Amazon

Pallet Nest Box

If you’re working on a tight budget, building your nesting boxes from pallets could be the way to go. This tutorial shows you how to use pallets to create the perfect nesting boxes.But the best part of building nesting boxes from pallets is they look good. Doing something on a budget doesn’t mean they have to look like it. These nesting boxes fit in this category.

Metal Wash Bin

Do you have an old washbin hanging around your property? Maybe you used it to plant flowers.If you’re done planting flowers in it and need a nesting box for your chickens, the old washbin could be what you need. Fill it with hay, and you have the perfect nesting box for little money.

Plastic Storage Bins

Plastic storage bins make a great way to have nesting boxes on a tight budget. You can purchase the storage bins at the dollar store.From there, use scrap wood or brackets to secure the bins to the coop. Fill it with hay, and your chickens will make it their new favorite laying spot in no time.

Kitty Litter Nesting Boxes

Do you have indoor cats? If this is the case, you also have plenty of empty litter containers. Why toss those containers to the landfill when they make perfect nesting boxes?You need to make a place for the containers to rest on their side. Next, fill them with straw. Before you know it, you’ll have plenty of nesting boxes for little money.

Upright Milk Crates

When we first began keeping chickens, we used these milk crates as our nesting boxes. They worked pretty well considering they are made cheap or for free.The only thing worth mentioning is it’s important to make sure you place something under the milk crates to ensure your eggs won’t fall through the slats.

Storage Tote Nesting Boxes

I enjoy a video tutorial from time to time to help walk me through different processes. This video is great for showing you how to create these nesting boxes.Plus, it shows how the boxes are meant to function. If you’re looking for an inexpensive and straightforward nesting box, you should check this idea out.

Gallon Bucket Nesting Boxes

If you’re a painter or someone who does drywall, you might come in contact with leftover buckets. Don’t let the buckets add to the clutter in landfills.Instead, use them to give your chickens nesting boxes. It’s simple to create and very inexpensive too.

DIY Bookshelf Nesting Box

Do you have an old bookshelf hanging around and aren’t sure what to do with it? If you need nesting boxes, your bookshelf found a purpose.These nesting boxes are easy to create, are a great way to repurpose an old piece of furniture, and they look nice too.

Diamond Shape Nesting Boxes

Everyone may not be able to understand this post because it’s written in a different language, but don’t let this deter you from checking out this idea. Even if you can’t understand the article, the idea is simple enough so you can create it regardless.You use milk crates and hang them at an angle where they look like diamonds. You place the crates together to form a larger diamond. They hang on the coop wall and appear to be both functional and appealing to the eye.

Linn Acres Farm Nesting Box Plans

These plans are phenomenal. They’re for nesting boxes which hang on the walls of the coop. The boxes take up less room than some designs which place the boxes on the floor as a standalone unit.However, these nesting boxes come with easy to read instructions. The plans are done on a computer which makes them easy to print off, read, and follow to give you the greatest opportunity for a successful build.

The Dresser Nesting Box

This is a unique way to use a piece of furniture which is no longer in use. You pull out some of the drawers of an old dresser and paint the dresser any color you like.From there, you turn two of the drawers into the nesting boxes. You’ll need to fill them full of straw and consider adding a divider or two to get more boxes.

External Nesting Boxes

I’ll be the first to admit; external nesting boxes are nice to have. You don’t have to go inside the coop to get an egg.Be aware you’ll want the lids to be on lock down because if not, a raccoon or snake can easily find their way into your boxes and take your eggs.

Wooden Barrel Nesting Box

Wine barrels can be rather expensive, but if you have one on hand which you aren’t using, consider putting it to use in your hen house.Turn the barrel on its side and fill it with straw. From there, the chickens crawl right inside and lay their delicious eggs in a fashionable nesting box.

Large Plastic Bowls

You can sometimes find large plastic bowls on sale at your local big box store towards the end of summer. If you hit a deal, buy a few.Next, fill them with straw or shavings and place them in your hen house. It’s an inexpensive way to give your hens the perfect location to lay eggs.

Covered Litterbox Nesting Boxes

Do you have an old litterbox your cats no longer use? Clean it out thoroughly and place it in your chicken coop.It doesn’t matter if the litterbox is covered. Hens like the privacy while they’re laying their eggs. It will provide the perfect location for your chickens to lay.

DIY Plywood Nesting Box

If you’re someone who prefers to build using plans, you should check this idea out. The plans are simple to follow.Also, they’re very well drawn out. The nesting boxes are built using plywood which makes them inexpensive too.

Tumbleweeds-and-Thyme Nesting Box Plans

This is another design of nesting boxes which are built to hang on a wall. If you would like to give your chickens as much space as possible in their coop, hanging their nesting boxes on the wall is the way to go.The particular design at hand is a great way to give ample laying space without taking up large amounts of floor space. It looks nice and appears to be simple to build.

Dishpan Nesting Boxes

Who knew dishpans could make such amazing nesting boxes? You can place a single dishpan, which has been braced to the wall, for your hens to lay in.Or you can do like this design, and place two dish pans on top of each other. This gives your hens more privacy as they lay.

Hanging Dresser Nesting Boxes

I’ve shared how you could take an old dresser and turn it into a nesting box for multiple hens. However, this idea takes things one step further.Instead of placing the dresser on the floor, they hang it on the wall and give the hens a ladder to climb when they wish to lay. This takes up no floor space and still functions well.

How Many Nesting Boxes Do You Need?

There really isn’t a definitive consensus on how many nest boxes you should have for your flock.A standard nest box for regular chickens such as Leghorns, Sussex, Plymouth Rocks, and hybrid layers needs to be a 12-inch cube, 12 inches tall, wide and deep. This will fit the average hen quite nicely.

Training Hens to Lay in them

There are lots of different nesting materials you can use. Below we are going to run through the most popular materials used.Any of these can be used for nesting materials, either separately or together. When supplies are good, I will fill a couple of boxes with pine needles, a couple with leaves, and a straw.

Readymade Nest Boxes

If you aren’t very DIY or don’t have enough time to make your own, then shop-bought nesting boxes will work for you.

Metal Poultry Nest

Ready-made plastic laying boxes are generally the cheapest ones on the market; they are ideal for beginners and small flocks.

DIY Chicken Nesting Box Plans

Metal boxes are the chosen type for small to mid-sized flocks. They are easy to clean, withstand a lot of abuse, and are relatively lightweight compared to wood.