Cavalier King Charles Spaniel vs King Charles Spaniel?

The origins of the King Charles Spaniel (the English Toy Spaniel) can be traced back to Asia, with these dogs sharing similarities with breeds like the Pekingese and Japanese Chin.

The arrival of the pug and other Japanese breeds led to interbreeding and some big changes to the King Charles Spaniel. During the 18th century, the Duke of Marlborough John Churchill became associated with the chestnut and white King Charles Spaniel.

In 1903, the intervention of King Edward IV was required when the Kennel Club attempted to amalgamate the King James (black and tan), Prince Charles (tricolour), Blenheim and Ruby spaniels into a single breed called the Toy Spaniel. However, an American called Rosswell Eldridge was keen to see a return to the old style English Toy Spaniel and offered a cash reward for breeders in 1926. Lets take a closer look at how the Kennel Club defines key features differently for both breeds.

The English Toy Spaniel: is a compact, cobby and essentially square to dog possessed of a short-nosed, domed head, a merry and affectionate demeanor and a silky, flowing coat. General symmetry and substance are more important than the actual weight; however, all other things being equal, the smaller sized dog is to be preferred. Proportion Compact and essentially square in shape, built on cobby lines.

The English Toy Spaniel: large in comparison to size, with a plush, chubby look, albeit with a degree of refinement which prevents it from being coarse. Cavalier King Charles Spaniel: Proportionate to size of dog, appearing neither too large nor too small for the body. Cavalier King Charles Spaniel: Slightly rounded, but without dome or peak; it should appear flat because of the high placement of the ears.

The English Toy Spaniel: Very short, with the nose well laid back and with well developed cushioning under the eyes.

What is the difference between King Charles Spaniel and Cavalier King Charles Spaniel?

While the colours may be the same (although called different names on occasion), their coats are different. The King Charles Spaniel has a heavy coat, while the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel has a coat of moderate length. … Both the English Toy Spaniel and Cavalier should be affectionate and loving dogs.

What's bad about Cavalier King Charles?

Cavalier King Charles Spaniels have several hereditary conditions which are common. Retinal disorders, cataracts, slipping patella, and hip dysplasia occur frequently. Mitral valve disease and syringomyelia are also more common with these dogs when compared to other breeds.

Are there different sizes of Cavalier King Charles Spaniels?

There are several major differences between the two breeds, with the primary difference being size. While the Cavalier weighs on average between 13 to 18 pounds (5.9 to 8.2 kg), the King Charles is smaller at 9 to 15 pounds (4.1 to 6.8 kg).

Do Cavalier King Charles spaniels bark a lot?

Generally speaking, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel doesn’t bark a lot. They’re docile nature makes such a behaviour uncharacteristic for these dogs. … Of course, they are dogs so dog owners can expect these dogs to bark from time to time.

Many people are unable to recognize the difference between the English Toy Spaniel and the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel. They are two entirely different breeds and, apart from sharing the same coat colors, have totally separate breed standards and characteristics.

The English Toy Spaniel, whose history has been documented since the 15th century, has its origins in the courts of Europe and gained official AKC recognition in 1886. The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel should demonstrate a gay temperament combined with true elegance and a look of royalty.

The English Toys eyes are large, very dark brown or black and set squarely in line with the nose. The Cavalier tail is well set on, carried happily but never much above the level of the back and in constant characteristic motion when the dog is in action. The standard clearly states that specimens whose coat has been altered by trimming, clipping or any other artificial means shall be so severely penalized as to be effectively eliminated from competition.

The Cavalier standard states a clear pearly white ground and calls for the color to be evenly spaced on the head surrounding both eyes. The Cavalier standard states the pearly white ground be clear and the color evenly spaced on the head and surrounding both eyes. Bad temper, shyness and meanness are not to be tolerated and are to be so severely penalized as to effectively remove the specimen from competition.

What is the difference between King Charles Spaniel and Cavalier King Charles Spaniel? Read on to find out the distinctions as well as the similarities of the 2 breeds.

However, there was a surge of interest in the 1920s when a wealthy American named Roswell Eldridge offered a cash reward to British breeders who could reproduce the breed. The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel breeds body is described as well-rounded with a hint of squareness.

Cavalier King Charles Spaniels have flat heads and longer muzzles, whilst King Charles Spaniels sport domed heads and flat faces with upturned noses. Some King Charles Spaniels are born with bobbed tails, and it is accepted in the breed standards. Blenheim : Red and white Prince Charles : A tricolour that consists of a white basecoat with large black patches and tan markings King Charles : Black and tan Ruby : Red

The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel breed has a long and silky fur of moderate length. Meanwhile, the King Charles Spaniel also sports a long and silky coat but heavy with a slight wave. These brushes are great at gently getting rid of mats and loose hair whilst massaging the skin and stimulating the distribution of natural oils.

Visiting the groomer every 46 weeks is also a great way to keep their coats tidy and reduce mats and tangles. Cutting it can also cause both breeds to have a hard time keeping themselves warm in winter and cool in summer. Cavalier King Charles Spaniels have a height of around 3033 centimetres (1213 inches) and a weight of about 58 kilos (1318 pounds).

These tiny dogs measure approximately 2527 centimetres (1011 inches) in height and 36 kilos (814 pounds) in weight. Unlike working dog breeds, they dont have high levels of energy and only need minimal exercise. Both toy dog breeds will benefit from going on short walks and a few sessions of playtime daily.

Their compact bodies and low need for exercise make them highly adaptable for apartment living. Both toy breeds are lapdogs that cherish their time with their owners and spend long periods staying close to them .

I am often surprised to see that that a lot of Cavalier King Charles Spaniels owners think it is the same breed as King Charles Spaniels. Dog geek that I am, I had to do some research. Here is what I found out:

The breed is infamous for a flurry of neurological issues from light chasing to severe locomotory impairments.

The history of King Charles Spaniel

The origins of the King Charles Spaniel (the English Toy Spaniel) can be traced back to Asia, with these dogs sharing similarities with breeds like the Pekingese and Japanese Chin.If we’re tracking back the history of the King Charles Spaniel in Great Britain, we have to go back to the 15th century when the descendants of these dogs first arrived in UK.They were thought to have been brought to Scotland from France in the 15th century. Indeed, there’s a painting of Queen Mary I (aka Bloody Mary) and King Phillip.Mary, Queen of Scots was also a fan of these English Toy Spaniels but it was Charles I and his son Charles II who really put the breed on the map in the 17th century.King Charles II was rarely seen without a couple of members of this breed by his side. Indeed, they had access all areas in his Palace even during state events.Such was his affection and love for the breed that they now carry his name: the King Charles Spaniel.When Charles II died in 1670s, these dogs remained popular until King Willian III and Queen Mary II came to power and introduced the Japanese breed Pug to UK.The arrival of the pug and other Japanese breeds led to interbreeding and some big changes to the King Charles Spaniel. They started to display the features of these Asian breeds.During the 18th century, the Duke of Marlborough John Churchill became associated with the chestnut and white King Charles Spaniel. Churchill earned recognition for his famous win at the Battle of Blenheim, which inspired the name of his residence, Blenheim Palace.As a result, the chestnut and white English Toy Spaniel are often called Blenheim King Charles Spaniel.In 1903, the intervention of King Edward IV was required when the Kennel Club attempted to amalgamate the King James (black and tan), Prince Charles (tricolour), Blenheim and Ruby spaniels into a single breed called the Toy Spaniel. The monarch insisted the breed retain the name King Charles Spaniel.These dogs had developed a large domed head with a snub-nosed muzzle. However, an American called Rosswell Eldridge was keen to see a return to the old style English Toy Spaniel and offered a cash reward for breeders in 1926.It led to a distinction being made between the King Charles Spaniel (English Toy Spaniel) and the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel (Eldrige’s desired style).The Cavalier was recognised by the Kennel Club in 1945 before the American Kennel Club granted the breed status in 1995.

A Brief History

The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel as we know it today was not given official AKC recognition until 1996. [Prior to that time, the breed spent many years in the Miscellaneous Class and was also exhibited at shows put on by the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Club, USA. CKCSC, USA breed shows continue to this day and many breeder-exhibitors show in both venues. — Eds.] The English Toy Spaniel, whose history has been documented since the 15th century, has its origins in the courts of Europe and gained official AKC recognition in 1886. In 2006 only 161 English Toy Spaniel litters were registered with the AKC, while the litter registration for Cavalier King Charles Spaniels exceeded 4,000.The first written reference to the King Charles Spaniel was around 1570. Named after King Charles II, it was originally a small sporting spaniel with a long muzzle. In the 1800s, those spaniels were bred with an oriental short-nosed spaniel to produce the modern King Charles Spaniel known in America as the English Toy Spaniel. The longer-nosed King Charles Spaniel was given separate breed status in 1945.What you must keep in mind when reading the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel standard is that it was written in a way to distinguish the difference between the English Toy Spaniel and the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel.

General Appearance

The English Toy Spaniel is a compact, cobby and essentially square toy dog, whereas the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is a well-balanced toy spaniel. The Cavalier approaches squareness, yet if it is measured from point of shoulder to point of buttock, it is slightly longer than the height at the withers. The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel should demonstrate a gay temperament combined with true elegance and a look of royalty. He must have a natural appearance with no trimming, sculpting or artificial alteration of the dog or coat.

Size, Proportion and Substance

The English Toy’s desirable weight for an adult is 8 to 14 pounds. It is compact, square in shape, built on cobby lines and sturdy of frame, solidly constructed. The Cavalier’s desirable adult weight is 13 to 18 pounds. The Cavalier height is 12 to 13 inches at the withers with moderate bone in proportion to size.

Head, Muzzle and Mouth

The English Toy head is large in comparison to the size of the dog, with a plush, chubby look. The skull is high and well-domed, full over the eyes. The ears are very long, set low and close to the head. The English Toy’s eyes are large, very dark brown or black and set squarely in line with the nose.The Cavalier head is proportionate to size of dog, appearing neither too large nor too small for the body. The skull is almost flat between the ears, and the ears are set high but not close on top of the head. The eyes are large, round and well set apart with dark rims.The English Toy has a deep, well-defined stop, and the muzzle is very short with nose well laid back. This breed should have a slightly undershot bite with a square, broad, deep and well turned-up jaw. A wry mouth should be penalized.The Cavalier stop is moderate, and the length of muzzle from base of stop to tip of nose is about 11/2 inches. The Cavalier has a perfect, regular scissors bite. An undershot bite, weak or crooked teeth or crooked jaw are faults in this breed.

Neck, Topline, Body and Tail

The neck on an English Toy is moderate in length and nicely arched. The body is short, compact, square and deep on cobby lines with a broad back. The breed should be sturdy of frame with good rib and deep brisket. The English Toy tail is docked to 2 to 4 inches in length and carried at or just slightly above the level of the back. The set of the tail is at the back’s level. Many are born with a shorter or screw tail, which is acceptable. The feathering on the tail should be silky and from 3 to 4 inches in length, constituting a marked “flag” of a square shape. The tail and its carriage is an index of the breed’s attitude and character.The Cavalier neck is fairly long, without throatiness, and muscled enough to form a slight arch at the crest. The body is short-coupled with ribs well sprung but not barreled. The chest is moderately deep, extending to elbows. Slightly less body at the flank than at the last rib but with no tucked up appearance. The Cavalier tail is well set on, carried happily but never much above the level of the back and in constant characteristic motion when the dog is in action. Docking is optional, but if docked, no more than one-third is to be removed.The topline on both breeds is level.