Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Puppies for Sale Cheap?

How much should I pay for a Cavalier King Charles puppy?

Cavalier King Charles Spaniels cost about the same as most small breeds. The average price is around $1,500 for a high-quality puppy from a recognized breeder. However, you can find them ranging from $1,000 to $2,500. Of course, where you purchase them from matters.

Why are King Charles Cavaliers so expensive?

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel. They are still uncommon and demand a higher price in the US, and since numerous health problems afflict the breed, it may stay that way. They suffer from heart disease, spinal cord problems, and can also have hip dysplasia.

How much is a mini King Charles Spaniel?

Puppy Prices and Expenses. Teacup Cavalier King Charles Spaniel costs around $2,000 to $14,000.

Where can I find a Cavalier King Charles puppy?

The easiest way to adopt a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel would be through a rescue that specializes in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels. A great place to start would be by starting a breed search on Adopt-a-Pet.com. The search will show you all the available Cavalier King Charles Spaniels in your area.

The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel (affectionately known as a Cav) is an offshoot of the King Charles Spaniel. The King Charles Spaniel was created by crossing small Spaniels with a short snouted breed such as the Pug or Japanese Chin. It was brought to Scotland from Continental Europe (possibly by Mary, Queen of Scots) in the 1500s or 1600s, where it became a fashionable lap dog and companion for the noble class. King Charles Spaniels were also popular lap warmers (and flea magnets) for the lower class. King Charles II, for whom the breed is named, grew up with a pet King Charles Spaniel (then known as the Toy Spaniel), and was such a big fan of the breed that he was accused of neglecting his official duties to spend time with his pet Spaniels. He once issued a decree that the breed could not be forbidden entry to any building, including Parliament! Some King Charles Spaniels, such as the red and white Blenheims, served as hunting dogs, but most strains were bred for appearance rather than work capacity. Over the years, the breed became smaller with a shorter nose. In the 1920s, a wealthy American man named Roswell Eldrige traveled to England and offered 25 pounds, a large sum at the time, for an old style or pointed nose version of the breed, similar to Charles IIs actual dog. The effort was successful, and the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel eventually surpassed its short nosed cousin in popularity, achieving American Kennel Club recognition in 1996.

Some King Charles Spaniels, such as the red and white Blenheims, served as hunting dogs, but most strains were bred for appearance rather than work capacity. In the 1920s, a wealthy American man named Roswell Eldrige traveled to England and offered 25 pounds, a large sum at the time, for an old style or pointed nose version of the breed, similar to Charles IIs actual dog.