Cats With Ear Tufts?

One of the most notable physical features of the Maine Coon cat is the mass of ears tufts that sprout out from the inner section of their large impressive ears. These fluffy wisps of hair stand proud of a Maine Coons tall ears and are often called ear furnishings.

With this point in mind, therefore, its not surprising that so many people are keen to ask Do all Maine Coon cats have ear tufts? Growing anywhere up to 4 inches in length, keep reading to find out when the Maine Coons impressive ear tufts first appear.

This is because the relative dominance of each individual cats DNA will likely impact a felines overall physical appearance, in some way. According to the Cat Fanciers Federation, Maine Coons should have large ears that sit high on their heads, are wide at the base, and taper to a point. Maine Coon lynx tips are considered a desirable physical feature that grows outwards from the point at the top of a cats ear.

This is because the wispy hair helps to prevent dirt and debris from the environment from reaching the cats delicate inner ear. If ear tufts are not present by this stage, it is highly possible that a Maine Coon will never develop these prestigious wispy hairs at all. I have not been able to find any independent research that clarifies what color purebred Maine Coon ear tufts should be.

It is not surprising that many people get confused with the technical terminology for each part of a Maine Coons ear. Lynx tips significantly differ in size, length, and volume, depending upon each cats individual genetics. Therefore, if your cat has not grown any tips by the time they are 2 years old, owners should discount the idea that they will ever grow.

The two-year mark is considered relevant in this matter because tip growth is thought to stop when a Maine Coons full coat has fully grown in.

What cat breeds have ear tufts?

Maine Coon..Norwegian Forest Cat..American Curl..Highlander..Pixiebob..Turkish Van..Ragdoll..Siberian.

Are Maine Coons the only cats with ear tufts?

All purebred Maine Coon cats have ear tufts that grow out of their inner ears, offering protection to the cat’s sensitive ear organ. Ear tufts are not necessarily present on part Maine Coons, or mixed Maine Coons though since their mixed genetics are likely to have influenced their overall physical looks. What is this?

Do domestic longhair cats have ear tufts?

Cat ear tufts, sometimes known as lynx tips, are the fur that grows from the tips of the ears. … Many domestic longhair cats (and some domestic shorthair cats) have ear furnishings, regardless of breed.

When you think of a Maine Coon cat, the first thing you probably think of is the enormous size. Another aspect of Maine Coon cats is their very obvious ear tufts. Thats the wild wispy hairs coming from inside their ears. You may be wondering if all Maine Coons have ear tufts or is it just yours. Its such a unique appearance feature for this cat breed and worth exploring. So, why do Maine Coons have ear tufts?

Cats ears are tall and open, so theres a chance foreign material can easily get inside. Any debris can get caught in the fur rather than go into the ear, possibly causing an infection or irritation.

Sure, we hate our hair there and trim it, but it primarily serves the same purpose as a cats ear tufts. Ive noticed that most Maine Coons have wispy hairs that each past the edges of their ears. Some Maine Coons might develop fuller, longer ear tufts with age, but they wont ever magically appear overnight.

I did some searching on the internet, but Im not sure if there are any definitive hours about why Maine Coons cats commonly have white ear tufts. If youre looking at your cat, especially in sunlight, Lynx tips are those few pieces of fur growing straight up from their ears. Those ear tufts serve your cat in different ways, but theyre not the same as Lynx tips.

We love pretty much everything about cats, but the exceptional cuteness of their ear fluff is especially hard to resist! Some breeds have adorable ear tufts, while others are graced with hairs known as ear furnishings, our new favorite term.

Image Credit: STVIOD, PixabayOne of the best-recognized breeds with impressive ear tufts is the Norwegian Forest Cat . As a breed that hails from the forests of Norway, its no surprise that these cats love to spend time hanging out in high places.

Their thick coat has a soft and dense undercoat to keep them warm and a waterproof topcoat to protect them from harsh weather. Temperament Friendly and gentle Weight 13-22 pounds Lifespan 12-16 years Shedding Medium to high Image Credit: Chicsweet, PixabayThe American Curl is a relatively modern breed and came about as a result of a genetic mutation.

American Curls can be born with regular straight ears, though, and these cats are still used within breeding programs to maintain a diverse gene pool. Their playful nature doesnt disappear with kittenhood, and some people call the American Curl the Peter Pan of cats. Image Credit: pompi, PixabayThe Maine Coon is instantly recognizable due to their large ear tufts.

Maine Coons have an easy, outgoing personality that many cat lovers find hard to resist. Temperament Friendly and outgoing Weight 9-18 pounds Lifespan 9-15 years Shedding Medium to high Image Credit: Lea Rae, ShutterstockThe Turkish Van is one of those rare breeds of cats that actually love water!

They also love to spend time up high, so make sure you offer many opportunities for your Turkish Van to climb. Temperament Playful and affectionate Weight 10-18 pounds Lifespan 12-17 years Shedding Low to medium Some breeders say that the Pixie-Bob originated as a cross between a domestic bar cat and a bobcat, but theres no real evidence to show that thats the case.

Temperament Loving and playful Weight 8-17 pounds Lifespan 13-15 years Shedding Medium to high Image Credit: elena_demeshkova, PixabayThe beautiful Siberian breed hails from the subarctic region of Russia and features in ancient folktales from their native area. Temperament Laidback and affectionate Weight 8-17 pounds Lifespan 11-18 years Shedding Medium to high

They enjoy learning new things and make excellent candidates for families with kids who want to teach their cat a few tricks. The curly coat is due to a genetic mutation, which is separate from other curly-coated breeds like the Devon or Cornish Rex. Image Credit: Antranias, PixabayThe stunning Birman hails from Burma, where they are known as the Sacred Cat.

Image Credit: Ondrej Prosicky, ShutterstockThese wild cats are native to Africa and Asia.

Ear tufts are a rare trait but they always mark an extremely special cat. Although cat breeds with ear tufts come in all shapes and sizes, one thing they have in common is that lovable cute-yet-wild look. Not surprising, since many of your housecats wild cousins have tufted ears as well!

Some say theyre descended from pet cats that Marie Antoinette shipped out of France before losing her head, while others believe theyre the result of housecats breeding with wild bobcats. The super-friendly Norwegian Forest Cat (or wedgie) sports a two-colored coat that grows long and fluffy to help them survive harsh winters in Scandinavia.

American Curls are beloved by cat fans for their fashionable appearance and boundless enthusiasm. Highlanders are the offspring of spotted Jungle Cats, graceful American Curls, and sometimes tame Caracals (see #13). The result is a wild-looking fuzzball with heart-melting curled ears, adorned with big horizontal tufts.

They share a lot of traits with the Turkish Angora, including ear tufts and a love of swimming. When you cuddle up with a Siberian, which developed its long coat and its ear-furnishings to survive the fearsome Russian winter, youll never feel cold. These graceful blue-gray cats, named after an ancient German myth, are proud of their silky coats and warm ear furnishings.

These untamed felines probably wont be curling up on your lap anytime soon, but their ear tufts can compete with the best of them. Lynxes are forest cats that prowl snowy woods, keeping warm with coats of luxuriant spotted fur. They have prominent ear tufts that catch dirt and debris and are believed to also act as antennae that help the Lynx pick up on distant sounds.

They have big ears with huge, dense tufts, curved so that they almost look like human eyebrows.

Norwegian Forest Cat

One of the best-recognized breeds with impressive ear tufts is the Norwegian Forest Cat. Known as “Wegies” to their fans, these large cats are gentle and friendly with their owners. They’re more reserved with strangers, so expect them to disappear or watch carefully from a distance. As a breed that hails from the forests of Norway, it’s no surprise that these cats love to spend time hanging out in high places. Their thick coat has a soft and dense undercoat to keep them warm and a waterproof topcoat to protect them from harsh weather.

American Curl

The American Curl is a relatively modern breed and came about as a result of a genetic mutation. Besides having tufts, their ears also have a distinctive curled appearance. American Curls can be born with regular straight ears, though, and these cats are still used within breeding programs to maintain a diverse gene pool. American Curls are outgoing and love people. They’re happiest when they’re surrounded by their family. They also make great pets for families with kids, as they love to learn tricks. Their playful nature doesn’t disappear with kittenhood, and some people call the American Curl the “Peter Pan” of cats.

Maine Coon

The Maine Coon is instantly recognizable due to their large ear tufts. This breed is native to America, and they have been kept as farm cats since the 19

Highlander

The Highlander breed blends the Jungle Curl and Desert Lynx breeds to create a modern mixed cat. They’re sometimes also called the Highlander Shorthair or Highland Lynx. They have the bobbed tail of the Desert Lynx and the tufted, curled ears of the Jungle Curl. Some Highlander cats have distinctive polydactyl paws, although these aren’t acceptable for cats that will be shown. Highlanders might look wild, but they’re friendly, smart, and people-oriented. They’re also confident and outgoing, so they do well in busy households. They love to learn tricks and will even enjoy going for walks on a harness and leash, once they’re trained to do so.

Turkish Van

The Turkish Van is one of those rare breeds of cats that actually love water! They often have white bodies with distinctive splashes of color on their heads, ears, and tails. Sometimes there will be spots of color on their coat too. The breed was brought to the U.S.A. in the 1970s, and they’ve been popular ever since. This breed is extremely athletic and loves to spend time playing. Give them a paddling pool in the garden, and they’ll be happy for hours! They also love to spend time up high, so make sure you offer many opportunities for your Turkish Van to climb. They might love affection, but they’re not fans of being picked up or cuddling on your lap. They will often enjoy sitting next to you on the couch, though!

Pixie-Bob

Don’t be fooled by the wild appearance of the Pixie-Bob, as these cats are as affectionate as they come. Some breeders say that the Pixie-Bob originated as a cross between a domestic bar cat and a bobcat, but there’s no real evidence to show that that’s the case. Whatever the origin of this breed, Pixie-Bobs are large yet chilled-out cats. They’re affectionate with their families and will prefer a home where they can be around people for most of the day. They’re also playful, which makes them a great choice for families with kids and multiple other pets.

Siberian

The beautiful Siberian breed hails from the subarctic region of Russia and features in ancient folktales from their native area. It’s no surprise that they have a dense coat to protect them from the cold and generous ear furnishings. The breed was imported to America in 1990 and has been gaining popularity ever since. Siberian cats are extremely affectionate and love following their owners around the house. They’re outgoing enough to enjoy interacting with strangers too. They’re one of the only cat breeds that love water, so don’t be tempted to keep a fish tank in the same house!

Ragdoll

The Ragdoll is a young breed, having first been established in the 1960s. They’re placid and calm cats, with their name being inspired by their habit of flopping softly when they’re picked up. They have a distinctive long-haired Himalayan pointed coat and bright blue eyes. Ragdolls love their humans and will always want to be close to you, preferably in your lap! They might be calm but Ragdolls also love to play. They enjoy learning new things and make excellent candidates for families with kids who want to teach their cat a few tricks. Ragdolls are not overly vocal, though they’ll always let you know if they need something!

LaPerm

The LaPerm breed was discovered in Oregon in 1982. One kitten in a litter was born bald and went on to develop a curly coat. All LaPerm cats can trace their ancestry back to this original curly-coated kitten. The curly coat is due to a genetic mutation, which is separate from other curly-coated breeds like the Devon or Cornish Rex. LaPerm are small cats and have wonderful playful natures. They love to spend time with their owners and will be happy to wait until you’re ready to give them attention. LaPerm love to learn new tricks and will enjoy going for walks once they’re trained to wear a harness.

Birman

The stunning Birman hails from Burma, where they are known as the Sacred Cat. They have Himalayan pointed coats and white paws, which are said to be symbols of their pure natures. This breed is a good choice if you love the coat of the Siamese breed but would prefer a less vocal cat. Birmans are quiet overall. They’re smart and curious, though, so they can get into trouble by exploring places they shouldn’t! They have an affectionate yet not overly demanding nature, and they enjoy spending time with their humans whenever they can.

Caracal

These wild cats are native to Africa and Asia. Their large ears are curved and densely tufted. The tufts extend 5cm above the ears, making them the longest ear tufts that we know of! As solitary cats, it’s thought that their ear tufts are used as a form of visual communication between cats when they meet.

The 13 Cat Breeds With Ear Tufts

These kitties have ear tufts, and usually also ear furnishings.

Maine Coon

Well known for being the biggest domesticated cat breed, Maine Coons are also famous for their long, soft coats, big paws, and ability to adapt to almost any environment. Some say they’re descended from pet cats that Marie Antoinette shipped out of France before losing her head, while others believe they’re the result of housecats breeding with wild bobcats.Maine Coons don’t just have ear tufts and ear furnishings, but also have big tufts of fur on their paws.

Norwegian Forest Cat

No, it’s not a helpful forest spirit from a fairy tale, but it’s the next best thing. The super-friendly Norwegian Forest Cat (or “wedgie”) sports a two-colored coat that grows long and fluffy to help them survive harsh winters in Scandinavia. They’re also renowned in old Norse legend for their ability to scale trees and rocks.Wedgies often have ear tufts, ear furnishings, and tufted toes. They’re close cousins of the Maine Coon, and the two breeds have a lot in common.

American Curl

American Curls are beloved by cat fans for their fashionable appearance and boundless enthusiasm. Their ears curl back over their heads, showing off their ear tufts and furnishings, and giving them a permanently surprised expression that you’ll fall in love with right away.

Highlander

There can be only one…one cat breed as pretty as the Highlander, that is. Highlanders are the offspring of spotted Jungle Cats, graceful American Curls, and sometimes tame Caracals (see #13).The result is a wild-looking fuzzball with heart-melting curled ears, adorned with big horizontal tufts. Another fun fact about Highlanders: unlike most other cats, they love to splash in the water.

Pixiebob

Pixiebobs are a “dog-like” breed that loves activities like fetching and going on walks. Their energy level and tabby coats have led people to wonder if they’re descended from bobcats, but according to their genetics, it’s more likely a coincidental mutation.Pixiebobs get their name from their stubby tails, but they’re also known to have ear tufts and ear furnishings.

Turkish Van

Turkish Vans hail from Lake Van, a stunning, secluded lake in the eastern part of Turkey. They’ve been around for thousands of years, treasured by the Turks for ages before making their way to Europe.Vans are beloved for their unique coloration, called the “Van Pattern,” which marks them with dark colors on their heads, necks, and tails. They share a lot of traits with the Turkish Angora, including ear tufts and a love of swimming.

Ragdoll

Ragdoll cats are easy to recognize: they look kind of like a Siamese, but fluffier. They’re intensely cuddly, often going limp in the arms of their humans, a trait which got them their breed name.Like the Pixiebob, a Ragdoll loves to play with its owner and can even be taught tricks. Purebred Ragdolls have ear furnishings, and tufts of hair between their toes.

Siberian

These forest cats from the wilds of Russia are another of our most ancient breeds still around today. They’re strong, bulky, and protective, but also playful and sweet-natured. When you cuddle up with a Siberian, which developed its long coat — and its ear-furnishings — to survive the fearsome Russian winter, you’ll never feel cold.

LaPerm

With their coats that naturally grow in loose curls and their curled ear furnishings, LaPerms are some of the world’s most unusual-looking cats. They start out looking like goblins, and mature into a cross between a Devon Rex and a bathmat. Petting a LaPerm is a lovely experience, which is good because they love attention!

Nebelung

Nebelungs appeared in the 1980s as the result of two Russian Blues producing a litter of long-haired kittens. These graceful blue-gray cats, named after an ancient German myth, are proud of their silky coats and warm ear furnishings. Although they can be demanding, they’re also deeply loving and enjoy taking walks with their favorite people.

Wild Cats

These untamed felines probably won’t be curling up on your lap anytime soon, but their ear tufts can compete with the best of them.

Serval

In fact, the Lynx’s tufts are so striking that another name for feline ear tufts is “lynx tips.”

Caracal

Caracals are wild cats found in Africa and many parts of Asia. They have big ears with huge, dense tufts, curved so that they almost look like human eyebrows. In addition to keeping its ears clean, the Caracal’s ear tufts might serve a social purpose, as some researchers believe they can be twitched to send messages to other Caracals.