Cat With No Ears?

The Scottish Fold is a breed of domestic cat with a natural dominant-gene mutation that affects cartilage throughout the body, causing the ears to “fold”, bending forward and down towards the front of the head, which gives the cat what is often described as an “owl-like” appearance.[1]

Susie’s ears had an unusual fold in their middle, making her resemble an owl . When Susie had kittens, two of them were born with folded ears, and one was acquired by William Ross, a neighbouring farmer and cat-fancier.

Susie’s only reproducing offspring was a female Fold named Snooks who was also white; a second kitten was neutered shortly after birth. The breed was not accepted for showing in Europe and the GCCF withdrew registrations in 1971 due to crippling deformity of the limbs and tail in some cats and concerns about genetic difficulties and ear problems such as infection , mites , and deafness , but the Folds were exported to America and the breed continued to be established using crosses with British Shorthairs and American Shorthairs . Since the initial concerns were brought, the Fold breed has not had the mite and infection problems, though wax buildup in the ears may be greater than in other cats.

The original cats only had one fold in their ears, but due to selective breeding, breeders have increased the fold to a double or triple crease that causes the ear to lie totally flat against the head. The nose will be short with a gentle curve and the cat‘s body well-rounded with a padded look and medium-to-short legs. [4] Short hair Scottish Folds have thick and soft fur, with long hair Folds having longer and exceptionally dense fur around their upper thighs, toes, ears, and tail.

[4] Scottish Folds typically have soft voices and display a complex repertoire of meows and purrs not found in better-known breeds. An early study suggested that the fold is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. [12] If Scottish Shorthairs are to be used, they should be test mated to a BSH to make sure that they are not genetically folds.

Scottish folds are susceptible to polycystic kidney disease (PKD) [15] and cardiomyopathy . [16] Scottish folds are also prone to degenerative joint disease, most commonly affecting the tail, ankles, and knees which can result in reduced range of motion. Osteochondrodysplasia (OCD) is a developmental abnormality that affects cartilage and bone development throughout the body.

[17] Homozygous Folds are affected by malformed bone structures and develop severe painful degenerative joint diseases at an early age. In the FIFe discussion, the representative for British breeders claimed that they were not seeing the problem in their cats and that the study which showed that all heterozygous also have the condition had a small sample size. An offer of free X-rays was presented to 300 breeders to find a Fold cat with healthy hind legs but it was never taken up.

[21][22] A similar offer was set up by the World Cat Federation together with researcher Leslie Lyons but there was also no response. FiFe stated that they will not consider recognizing Scottish Folds if breeders will not allow their breed to be scrutinized. In a report on Scottish Folds, the Breed Standards Advisory Council (BSAC) for New Zealand Cat Fancy (NZCF) states that “Breeders may not have appreciated the strength of the evidence that heterozygous cats can and do develop [feline] OCD.”

Requesting the agreement of pet owners to be periodically contacted by the NZCF or by a researcher, to provide reports about the health of their cat. Requirements to be in place for a minimum of 5 years to enable tracking of the health of Folds over time. ^ “Scottish Fold Cat Breed Information, Pictures, Characteristics & Facts” .

^ “Scottish Fold Profile – History, Appearance & Temperament – Cat World” . ^ “Scottish Fold Cat Breed Information, Pictures, Characteristics & Facts.” ^ A dominant TRPV4 variant underlies osteochondrodysplasia in Scottish fold cats.Gandolfi B, Alamri S, Darby WG, Adhikari B, Lattimer JC, Malik R, Wade CM, Lyons LA, Cheng J, Bateman JF, McIntyre P, Lamand SR, Haase B.Osteoarthritis Cartilage.

Kim, T.J. Cho, M. Schmidt-Rimpler, H. Tonoki, K. Takikawa, et al.Novel and recurrent TRPV4 mutations and their association with distinct phenotypes within the TRPV4 dysplasia family. ^ “Genetic welfare problems of companion animals: Scottish Fold: Osteochondrodysplasia” . ^ “The GCCF says Health Comes First” Archived 14 May 2007 at the Wayback Machine , The Governing Council of the Cat Fancy “Breeding and Registration Rules (date of issue: 01.01.2008)” as described in 2.7.3 “Genetic Diseases” Archived 20 August 2008 at the Wayback Machine , Fdration Internationale Feline ^ “FIFe decision not to accept Scottish Fold breed in May 2003” .

What breed of cat has no ears?

Almost a rarity for any breed of species, the Scottish fold cat can trace its roots back to one particular cat named Susie. Susie was a barn cat living in Scotland who so happened to have flat ears.

Why do some cats have no ears?

However, this is the result of a genetic condition that can cause them to have short and painful lives. … She says the cats have a genetic mutation that affects their cartilage which leads to the folding of the ears and an owl-like appearance. “The cartilage is deformed and it is not supporting the ears,” Ms Ravetz says.

Can a cat live without a ear?

Your cat will still be able to hear after the ear canal is removed, although sounds will be dampened, sort of the same way they are when you wear earplugs. You may also notice that he’s happier and more active because he’s more comfortable.

Why are Scottish Fold cats banned?

The ban is being introduced because the animals may develop serious health problems as a result of a gene that they are carriers of. The cat so beloved of the American singer Taylor Swift has folded ears as a result of a genetic defect.

Meet Potatothe most adorable and handsome earless cat that you’ve ever seen. Before getting rescued by a local shelter, the dapper boy was a stray cat living on the city streets in China. Animal rescuers found sick and abandoned Potato 2 years ago and the poor fella had serious ceruminous adenoma in his ear canals and on his ear flaps. The vets treated him to remove the adenoma, but, unfortunately, it returned. Afterward, the vet advised removing his canals and flaps to prevent the disease from reoccurring.

The cat, named Lady in a Fur Coat, was bought into the Dane County Humane Society in December and immediately began treatment for chronic ear infections and hematomas, spokesperson Marissa DeGroot told CNN.

The sweet girl, known at the shelter for her love of cuddles and head bumps, was adopted on Tuesday just hours after the Humane Society — which serves the Madison area — posted photos on Facebook of Lady in her new ears.

One of the most famous cats on the internet is a Scottish fold who lives in Japan called Maru, whose videos have been watched more than 300 million times on Youtube.

The British Veterinary Association has warned breeding of Scottish fold cats should stop because of health fears. The breed has had a surge of popularity after celebrity owners such as Taylor Swift and Ed Sheeran posted photos on Instagram.

Image caption, Celebrities such as Ed Sheeran and Taylor Swift own Scottish fold cats The breed is popular because it is “cute”, says Gudrun Ravetz, the president of the British Veterinary Association. “These genetic mutations, which all the Scottish fold cats will have, develop into lifelong incurable and painful diseases such as a type of arthritis.”

All Scottish folds are descended from a white barn cat named Susie who was discovered living on a farm near Coupar Angus in 1961. She caught the eye of a local shepherd and cat fancier, William Ross, who noted that her ears folded forward. However, in the early 1970s, the GCCF stopped registering folds because of concerns about ear disorders and hearing problems.

One of the cats found his way to Salle Wolfe Peters in Pennsylvania, who is thought to be chiefly responsible for developing the breed in the United States. Dee has been breeding Scottish Folds for 10 years, even providing pop star Ed Sheeran with his beloved cats. Ms Ravetz said: “There is no excuse for breeding from an animal who we know is going to suffer a painful and lifelong incurable disease.

She added: “This desire to have something based on looks rather than quality of life is across many of the pets we are getting and that’s being fuelled by social media. Vet Record editor Adele Waters said: “There is really something wrong in the way that we as a society believe that it is right to breed animals for their looks.

Origin[edit]

The original Scottish Fold was a white barn cat named Susie, who was found at a farm near Coupar Angus in Perthshire, Scotland, in 1961. Susie’s ears had an unusual fold in their middle, making her resemble an owl. When Susie had kittens, two of them were born with folded ears, and one was acquired by William Ross, a neighbouring farmer and cat-fancier.Susie’s only reproducing offspring was a female Fold named Snooks who was also white; a second kitten was neutered shortly after birth. Three months after Snooks’ birth, Susie was killed by a car. All Scottish Fold cats share a common ancestry to Susie.

Acceptance[edit]

The breed was not accepted for showing in Europe and the GCCF withdrew registrations in 1971 due to crippling deformity of the limbs and tail in some cats and concerns about genetic difficulties and ear problems such as infection, mites, and deafness, but the Folds were exported to America and the breed continued to be established using crosses with British Shorthairs and American Shorthairs. Since the initial concerns were brought, the Fold breed has not had the mite and infection problems, though wax buildup in the ears may be greater than in other cats.

Popularity[edit]

The rare distinctive physical traits of the breed, combined with their reputation as unusually loving companions, make Folds highly sought-after pets and Fold kittens typically cost considerably more than kittens of more common breeds.

Body[edit]

The kittens that do not develop folded ears are known as

Coat[edit]

Scottish Folds can be either long- or short-haired, and they may have nearly any coat color or combination of colours (including white).

Temperament[edit]

Scottish Folds, whether with folded ears or with normal ears, are typically good-natured and placid and adjust to other animals within a household extremely well. They tend to become very attached to their human caregivers and are by nature quite affectionate. Folds also receive high marks for playfulness, grooming and intelligence. Scottish Folds like to be outdoors and enjoy outdoor games and activities. Loneliness is something they heavily dislike and which makes them feel depressed.

Habits[edit]

Folds are also known for sleeping on their backs.

Genetics[edit]

An early study suggested that the fold is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait.Mating a homozygous fold with any cat will produce all folds, but because homozygous folds are prone to severe health issues, breeding for them is generally considered unethical. A homozygous to normal mating will produce only heterozygous folds but presumably in ethical breeding programs, there will be no homozygous cats available to breed from.The only generally accepted breeding gives a 50% chance of producing heterozygous folds and 50% chance of producing normals.There is suspicion that some non-fold litters are genetically heterozygous folds but because of very low expression of the gene, appear to be straight-eared. Such kittens may develop folded ears initially which then straighten back out. Because of this there are suggestions by some breeders to avoid mating Folds with straight-eared Scottish Folds but only use British Shorthairs (BSH) as outcross.In 2016 the genetic mutation responsible for the folded ears and the OCD was identified. It was found in a gene encoding a calcium permeable ion channel, transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 4 (TRPV4).

Health[edit]

The typical lifespan of a Scottish Fold is 15 years.Scottish folds are susceptible to polycystic kidney disease (PKD)

See also[edit]

Osteochondrodysplasia (OCD) is a developmental abnormality that affects cartilage and bone development throughout the body. This condition causes the ear fold in the breed and, in studies conducted so far, all Fold cats are affected by it.While ethical breeders breed Fold/non-Fold and not Fold/Fold (in the same way Munchkins are bred) to avoid producing homozygous Folds,CFA breeders have stated that using only Fold to non-Fold breeding has eliminated problems with stiff tails, shortened tails and bone lesions.In a report on Scottish Folds, the Breed Standards Advisory Council (BSAC) for New Zealand Cat Fancy (NZCF) states that “Breeders may not have appreciated the strength of the evidence that heterozygous cats can and do develop [feline] OCD.” While research shows that all heterozygous Folds develop OCD, and anecdotal evidence shows that heterozygous Folds can and do develop OCD, they do not show whether mildly affected parents are more likely to have mildly affected offspring. They also do not show what percentage of Folds are severely affected. The report states that there is not enough information to justify banning Scottish Fold matings but enough to justify a level of concern.The short novel

Should Scottish fold cats be banned?

The breed has had a surge of popularity after celebrity owners such as Taylor Swift and Ed Sheeran posted photos on Instagram.The cats, which originated in Scotland in the 1960s, are famous for their small floppy ears.However, this is the result of a genetic condition that can cause them to have short and painful lives.One of the most famous cats on the internet is a Scottish fold who lives in Japan called Maru, whose videos have been watched more than 300 million times on Youtube.The breed is popular because it is “cute”, says Gudrun Ravetz, the president of the British Veterinary Association.She told BBC Scotland: “These cats have become so popular on social media and with celebrities.”People are wanting to have these cats because of that, but unfortunately it is another example of us prioritising how a pet looks rather than their quality of life.”She says the cats have a genetic mutation that affects their cartilage which leads to the folding of the ears and an owl-like appearance.”The cartilage is deformed and it is not supporting the ears,” Ms Ravetz says.She says the cartilage mutation also leads to problems with other parts of the cat‘s body.”These genetic mutations, which all the Scottish fold cats will have, develop into lifelong incurable and painful diseases such as a type of arthritis.”

What is the Scottish fold cat?

All Scottish folds are descended from a white barn cat named Susie who was discovered living on a farm near Coupar Angus in 1961.She caught the eye of a local shepherd and cat fancier, William Ross, who noted that her ears folded forward.The Rosses started a breeding programme and in 1966 began registering their cats with the Governing Council of the Cat Fancy, the UK’s pedigree cat registry.However, in the early 1970s, the GCCF stopped registering folds because of concerns about ear disorders and hearing problems.The breed’s popularity in the UK fell after this but the United States soon took the cats to its heart.They were first introduced to the US in 1970 when three kittens from one of Susie’s descendents were sent to a research centre in Massachusetts for a study of their mutations.When the research was abandoned, the cats were re-homed.One of the cats found his way to Salle Wolfe Peters in Pennsylvania, who is thought to be chiefly responsible for developing the breed in the United States.The breed is still popular in the US and has been exported around the world.

Health problems

The GCCF said it had maintained its ban on the breed since the 1970s on health grounds.Rosemary Fisher, from the GCCF, said: “They are cute but then you realise the health problems they have.”We don’t register them or even allow them to be exhibited or put in our shows.”However, the breed can be registered with other organisations in Britain and around the world.